/Industry News
Cambo Lens Adapter for Fuji GFX50s and Canon EF Lenses

Cambo Lens Adapter for Fuji GFX50s and Canon EF Lenses

By Canon Rumors | March 26, 2017 | Third Party Accessories

Cambo announces a new lens adapter to fit Canon lenses to the Fujifilm GFX50s.

The CA-GFX will be the third Canon lens adapter that Cambo have manufactured and marketed for camera movement. Having successfully adapted Canon lenses to the Cambo ACTUS (ACB-CA) and more recently the WIDE series camera (WRES-CA.) It was a natural transition to manufacture the adapter as it gives many photographers the option of using their existing lenses with the latest mirrorless, large sensor, Fujifilm GFX50s (CA-GFX.

Cambo CA-GFX Adapter
The CA-GFX adapter fits directly to the bayonet of the GFX camera body and the lens aperture is controlled electronically when dialling in the required f-stop. As there is no direct connection between lens and body, there is no data received; aperture, auto-focus or EXIF, from the lens.

Why make this lens adapter?
The Fujifilm GFX50s sensor measures 33x44mm and Canon lenses such as the 17mm T-SE and 24mm T-SE have very large image circles, they will cover the sensor size and will enable the photographer to apply movement.

Cambo CA-GFX Adapter
The CA-GFX (Product code: 99070301) is available from your local dealer.

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Sigma Mount Converter MC-11 EF-E Firmware Update

Sigma Mount Converter MC-11 EF-E Firmware Update

By Canon Rumors | March 21, 2017 | Third Party Lenses

From Sigma:
We would like to announce the firmware update for the SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 EF-E. This firmware update allows it to be compatible with the SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art (Release: April), SIGMA 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary (TBD), Cine Lens 50mm T1.5 FF EF mount from FF High Speed Prime Line (TBD) and so on.

For customers who own the SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 EF-E, please update the firmware via SIGMA Optimization Pro by connecting it to a computer using a supplied USB Cable.

Read more…

Interview With Kenji Tanaka, Head of Sony ILC Business

Interview With Kenji Tanaka, Head of Sony ILC Business

By Canon Rumors | March 19, 2017 | Industry News

An interview with Sony’s head of their ILC business that was originally posted on Imaging Resource has surfaced over at Sony Addict, as it appears Imaging Resource pulled it for whatever reason.

It’s an interesting interview, as it really gives you a good idea about Sony’s philosophy on growing the mirrorless camera space.

Sony Addict broke down the major points of the interview:

  • Some sensors are reserved for Sony (Maybe this is why no one else is using their 42MP Full Frame sensor)
  • Sony invested billions in sensor technology and lenses
  • The Full Frame market is the most stable, but Sony wants to grow it slowly
  • “Before 42 megapixels… nobody needed such a resolution……but right now, people enjoy 42-megapixel cameras.”
  • “Now we are focused on three essential factors. One is of course the resolution, and another is the sensitivity, and third is the speed.”
  • Sports shooters target one millisecond in time so they might enjoy shooting 100-120fps
  • There is room for AF speed and intelligence improvement
  • Nikon/Canon use two systems for AF so their system can’t be intelligent. Our system can be intelligent because our sensor manages the AF.
  • AF and Exposure could benefit from Intelligence (AI)
  • The real advantage of mirrorless is direct information not the lack of a mirror.
  • An early problem with mirrorless was getting the data off the chip fast enough. Now the problem is interpreting all the data.
  • Sony a7RII mainly brought in customers form other systems, but Sony hopes to grow the ILC market beyond current DSLR/ILC users.
  • “I have said, too, that amateurs, people who don’t consider themselves photographers, like moms and dads, they need more advanced technology than the pros, because they’re the ones who more than anything need smart cameras and intelligent sensors. So maybe that will come.”
  • Full frame is their primary area
  • The price difference between Full Frame and APS-C could get closer together with time.
  • “I want to show our technology. The technology can change the future. Right now, I think American people still think the DSLR structure with mirror and shutter is best. But the technology can change that kind of way. And I think only Sony can do it. So I want to explain why the future is changing. And sensor is one aspect, and the lens is another one. Of course, intelligence is another aspect, but there are many technologies we have, so these things I want to tell your users. And of course [by combining] these technologies we create new cameras. So I want to show you the new camera…mirrorless can take a photo that the even professional DSLRs couldn’t capture.”

You can head over the Sony Addict for a cached version of the entire interview.

Announcing Guetzli: A New Open Source JPEG Encoder

Announcing Guetzli: A New Open Source JPEG Encoder

By Canon Rumors | March 17, 2017 | Industry News

From Google:

At Google, we care about giving users the best possible online experience, both through our own services and products and by contributing new tools and industry standards for use by the online community. That’s why we’re excited to announce Guetzli, a new open source algorithm that creates high quality JPEG images with file sizes 35% smaller than currently available methods, enabling webmasters to create webpages that can load faster and use even less data.

Guetzli [guɛtsli] — cookie in Swiss German — is a JPEG encoder for digital images and web graphics that can enable faster online experiences by producing smaller JPEG files while still maintaining compatibility with existing browsers, image processing applications and the JPEG standard. From the practical viewpoint this is very similar to our Zopfli algorithm, which produces smaller PNG and gzip files without needing to introduce a new format, and different than the techniques used in RNN-based image compression, RAISR, and WebP, which all need client and ecosystem changes for compression gains at internet scale.

The visual quality of JPEG images is directly correlated to its multi-stage compression process: color space transform, discrete cosine transform, and quantization. Guetzli specifically targets the quantization stage in which the more visual quality loss is introduced, the smaller the resulting file. Guetzli strikes a balance between minimal loss and file size by employing a search algorithm that tries to overcome the difference between the psychovisual modeling of JPEG’s format, and Guetzli’s psychovisual model, which approximates color perception and visual masking in a more thorough and detailed way than what is achievable by simpler color transforms and the discrete cosine transform. However, while Guetzli creates smaller image file sizes, the tradeoff is that these search algorithms take significantly longer to create compressed images than currently available methods.

Figure 1. 16×16 pixel synthetic example of a phone line hanging against a blue sky — traditionally a case where JPEG compression algorithms suffer from artifacts. Uncompressed original is on the left. Guetzli (on the right) shows less ringing artefacts than libjpeg (middle) and has a smaller file size.

And while Guetzli produces smaller image file sizes without sacrificing quality, we additionally found that in experiments where compressed image file sizes are kept constant that human raters consistently preferred the images Guetzli produced over libjpeg images, even when the libjpeg files were the same size or even slightly larger. We think this makes the slower compression a worthy tradeoff.

Figure 2. 20×24 pixel zoomed areas from a picture of a cat’s eye. Uncompressed original on the left. Guetzli (on the right) shows less ringing artefacts than libjpeg (middle) without requiring a larger file size.

It is our hope that webmasters and graphic designers will find Guetzli useful and apply it to their photographic content, making users’ experience smoother on image-heavy websites in addition to reducing load times and bandwidth costs for mobile users. Last, we hope that the new explicitly psychovisual approach in Guetzli will inspire further image and video compression research.

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