Archive for the ‘Canon Cinema EOS’ Category

Canon U.S.A. Announces Free Firmware And Application Software Upgrades For Select Cinema EOS System Cameras

Canon U.S.A. Announces Free Firmware And Application Software Upgrades For Select Cinema EOS System Cameras

MELVILLE, N.Y., April 3, 2013 – Canon U.S.A., Inc. a leader in digital imaging solutions, announced today new firmware and application software upgrades for the Company’s Cinema EOS System lineup of cameras. New ACES compatibility software for the Cinema EOS C500 and Cinema EOS C500 PL Digital Cameras will be available as a free download expected in June 2013. Additional Cinema EOS firmware upgrades, including a new 1,440 x 1,080 pixel recording mode at 35Mbps for the Cinema EOS C300 and Cinema EOS C300 PL Digital Cameras, are expected to be available as free downloads starting in October 2013, all from thewww.usa.canon.com.

In response to strong demand from professionals working in the fields of motion picture, commercial and television production, the firmware and application software upgrades will offer enhanced color management efficiency and camera functionality, contributing to improved video production workflow efficiency.

ACES Compatibility for Greater Production Workflow Efficiency (EOS C500/EOS C500 PL)

Cinema EOS C500 and Cinema EOS C500 PL camera users will be able to download a new version of Canon’s Cinema RAW Development Software for working with 4K RAW data. The new version provides support for the Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) color management standard, as defined by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) and standardized by the Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers (SMPTE). Compatibility with ACES helps make efficient workflows possible, enabling color management using a uniform color space – even when handling video captured using multiple cameras with different color characteristics.

Automatic Functions (EOS C300) and New Recording Mode (EOS C300/EOS C300 PL)

A new firmware upgrade for the Cinema EOS C300 Digital Camera adds Push Auto Iris and One-Shot Autofocus (AF), two outstanding automatic functions incorporated in the Cinema EOS C100 Digital Camera (released in November 2012). These functions enable users to automatically adjust lens aperture and focusing through a simple one-touch operation, which can be particularly useful for cinematographers and videographers shooting without the support of an assistant.

In addition, a firmware upgrade for the Cinema EOS C300 and Cinema EOS C300 PL Digital Cameras adds a 1,440 x 1,080 pixel recording mode at 35Mbps, a resolution widely used in terrestrial digital television broadcasting. This new mode will expand the versatility of the XF codec and can be a useful addition for broadcast applications where the reduced bandwidth requires less transmission time while still maintaining a high level of image quality.

Shifting Display Location during Magnified Focus Assist (EOS C100, EOS C300/EOS C300 PL, EOS C500/EOS C500 PL)

Firmware upgrades for the EOS C500 and EOS C500 PL, EOS C300, EOS C300 PL, and EOS C100 Digital Camera models enable the Magnified Focus Assist function’s magnified view area within the viewfinder and LCD monitor to be shifted to locations other than the center of the screen, allowing users to confirm focus across the entire display area.

About ACES

Professionals in the cinema, television and other high-quality digital production industries commonly make use of multiple cameras when shooting video. As these cameras employ different sensors, each offers varying color characteristics. In addition, users can select from a diverse range of camera settings during image capture, such as aperture, focus position, frame rate and recording format, and because of this, images shot for a single scene can produce different results in terms of color and gradation, depending on the camera used.

Furthermore, when inputting, editing and outputting video, professionals may use various displays, each with its own color space, resulting in differences in how colors appear depending on the device used, even when viewing the same footage. For example, the viewfinder of a camera used during filming, the PC display used to edit the images, and the projector or television for viewing the video each offer varying color characteristics, causing the colors in the video to appear differently.

Therefore, color management takes a great deal of time and effort to correct for camera- and display monitor-related color differences.

ACES is a color management architecture developed by AMPAS, and standardized by SMPTE, that aims to improve efficiency among complex color management workflows by delivering uniform color expression through a standardized color space used during the video production workflow. Through compatibility with ACES, video captured using different cameras and settings can be aligned with the ACES color space, which offers a wide color range and high dynamic range. ACES provides an archive-ready file format, and also delivers high workflow efficiency by allowing users to confirm images with the same appearance even when using display devices with varying color characteristics during input and output.

Canon Announces the Development of New High Sensitivity Sensor

Canon Announces the Development of New High Sensitivity Sensor

Press Release
TOKYO, March 4, 2013—Canon Inc. announced today that the company has successfully developed a high-sensitivity 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor exclusively for video recording. Delivering high-sensitivity, low-noise imaging performance, the new Canon 35 mm CMOS sensor*1 enables the capture of Full HD video even in exceptionally low-light environments.

The newly developed CMOS sensor features pixels measuring 19 microns square in size, which is more than 7.5-times the surface area of the pixels on the CMOS sensor incorporated in Canon’s top-of-the-line EOS-1D X and other digital SLR cameras. In addition, the sensor’s pixels and readout circuitry employ new technologies that reduce noise, which tends to increase as pixel size increases. Thanks to these technologies, the sensor facilitates the shooting of clearly visible video images even in dimly lit environments with as little as 0.03 lux of illumination, or approximately the brightness of a crescent moon—a level of brightness in which it is difficult for the naked eye to perceive objects. When recording video of astral bodies, while an electron-multiplying CCD,*2 which realizes approximately the same level of perception as the naked eye, can capture magnitude-6 stars, Canon’s newly developed CMOS sensor is capable of recording faint stars with a magnitude of 8.5 and above.*3

Using a prototype camera employing the newly developed sensor, Canon successfully captured a wide range of test video,*4 such as footage recorded in a room illuminated only by the light from burning incense sticks (approximately 0.05–0.01 lux) and video of the Geminid meteor shower. The company is looking to such future applications for the new sensor as astronomical and natural observation, support for medical research, and use in surveillance and security equipment. Through the further development of innovative CMOS sensors, Canon aims to expand the world of new imaging expression.

Canon Marketing Japan Inc. will be exhibiting a prototype camera that incorporates the newly developed 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor and sample footage captured with the camera at SECURITY SHOW 2013, which will be held from Tuesday, March 5, to Friday, March 8, at the Tokyo International Exhibition Center in Tokyo, Japan.

  • An imaging element (aspect ratio: 16:9) that supports the largest image circle size possible when shooting with a Canon EF lens.
  • A CCD sensor with a readout mechanism that multiplies electrons after being converted from light. Applications include nighttime surveillance and the capture of astral bodies and nighttime nature scenes.
  • The brightness of a star decreases 2.5-times with each 1 magnitude increase.
  • Recording of test video footage was made possible through cooperation from ZERO Corporation.

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Canon Cinema EOS C50 [CR1]

Canon Cinema EOS C50 [CR1]

More coming for Cinema EOS?
There have been numerous mentions of a camera coming in under the Canon EOS C100, an EOS C50 if you will. What could be removed from the EOS C100 to make another cinema EOS camera a lot cheaper? Currently a C100 costs about $6500, and we’ve been told numerous times that Canon thinks they’ll need a cheaper camera to get more people into the system and in turn, the upgrade path.

We’ve had two mentions of prototypes existing out in the wild, but no word yet as to whether or not they will become a consumer product.

For me, a dunce of a filmmaker. $6500 is too much money to spend just to show my family bad films on Vimeo. I’d really like a video camera that costs about half that with an EF mount. I could be in the minority on that one, but I much prefer to shoot video with a video camera as opposed to a DSLR.

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New Cinema Camera & Lenses for NAB 2013

New Cinema Camera & Lenses for NAB 2013

NAB 2013 April 6 – April 11 – Las Vegas, Nevada
Canon will be announcing new cinema lenses and a new cinema camera for NAB 2013 we are told.

The camera will sit somewhere between the EOS C100 and EOS C300, but will not be a direct replacement for the EOS C100. It will have both a PL and EF mount option. At present, no specifications for the camera have been given. Canon may also show a prototype that would come above the C500, but apparently that has yet to be decided internally.

Lenses, no mention of focal length. One will be a zoom and the other a prime. There is some suggestion both could be “lower quality” version of  Canon’s current cine lenses. This is something similar to what Leica is doing with their cinema lens lineup.

No mention of a DSLR being announced for the show. I would expect some goodies for the EOS-1D C to come around NAB in the form of a firmware update. We already know they’ll be adding 25P in 4K, maybe there are a few other things they could add?

Canon EOS-1D C at B&H Photo $11,999

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Canon U.S.A. Introduces Two New Cinema Prime Lenses, Expanding The Cinema EOS Prime Lens Product Line To Five Models

Designed for Film-Style Operation, Canon Cinema Prime Lenses Deliver Exceptional 4K Performance

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., January 10, 2013 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, announces the new CN-E14mm T3.1 L F and CN-E135mm T2.2 L F single-focal-length lenses for large-format single-sensor cameras employing Super 35mm or full frame 35mm imagers. These two new lenses join with Canon’s CN-E24mm T1.5 L F, CN-E50mm T1.3 L F, and CN-E85mm T1.3 L F primes to provide a broad line of five precision-matched, competitively priced EF-mount Cinema prime lenses that provide high optical performance levels and a choice of versatile focal lengths for a wide range of creative shooting choices. All five Canon Cinema prime lenses are part of the Canon Cinema EOS System of professional digital cinematography products, which include the EOS C500 4K/2K Digital Cinema Camera, EOS C300 Digital Cinema Camera, EOS C100 Digital Video Camera and EOS-1D C 4K DSLR Cinema Camera, and four Canon Cinema zoom lenses.

 

CN-E14mm T3.1 L F and CN-E135mm T2.2 L F

CN-E14mm T3.1 L F and CN-E135mm T2.2 L F

“Since our introduction to the film and television production industry back in November 2011, we have brought to market five Cinema prime lenses, two top-end Cinema zoom lenses, two compact Cinema zoom lenses, and four professional digital cinematography cameras all within 18 months,” stated Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A. “This is a testament to the Company’s dedication to the needs of the growing and diverse universe of professionals creating 4K, 2K, and HD moving-image content for theatrical, television, and other high-resolution digital production markets. We look forward to continuing to serve these professionals with Canon Cinema EOS products designed to help them achieve their creative imperatives and commercial aspirations.”

All Canon Cinema EOS lenses integrate advanced materials and coatings to meet high optical performance levels, including 4K (4096 x 2160) production standards. Each Canon Cinema lens is equipped with an odd-numbered 11-blade aperture diaphragm, which is ideally suited to achieve creative depth-of-field manipulation and pleasing “bokeh” effects of cinematographic quality. The Canon line of five Cinema prime lenses is precision-matched for consistent and solid optical performance that minimizes focus-induced changes in the angle of view. All feature a full-frame image circle in a lightweight, compact design, and they incorporate proven Canon lens elements designed to fulfill contemporary 4K production standards. All five primes also deliver color tone and balance that matches Canon’s top-end Cinema zooms and compact Cinema zooms. Canon Cinema prime lenses are also water-resistant for severe shooting conditions and deliver the operation and reliability required in professional film-style shooting environments.

All five Canon Cinema primes feature mechanical attributes specifically designed for motion-picture production, as opposed to still photography. These strategically integrated film-style characteristics include 300 degree rotation on the focus ring for precision focus control as well as large, highly visible engraved focus scales for convenient operation. These markings appear on the angled surfaces on both sides of the barrel, making them easy to both read and to adjust the stepless focus and/or aperture settings of the lenses from behind – or from either side – of the camera. Focus markings can be switched from standard labeling to metric, and control rings are engineered to maintain the proper amount of resistance with consistent operating torque and familiar tactile “feedback” for satisfying manual control. All Canon Cinema prime lenses also share the same uniform gear positions, diameters, and rotation angles, as well as front-lens diameters, making them compatible with matte boxes, follow focus gear, marking disks, and other third-party film-industry-standard accessories. Film crews can quickly change lenses without the need for accessory gear-position adjustments or other changes to the rig setup.

The new Canon CN-E14mm T3.1 and CN-E135mm T2.2 Cinema prime lenses – as well as the Canon CN-E24mm T1.5, CN-E50mm T1.3, and CN-E85mm T1.3 primes – are fully compatible with the Canon EOS C500, EOS C300, EOS C100 and EOS-1D C digital cinema cameras. The EF-mount design of all five Canon Cinema prime lenses provides communication with these cameras for such handy features as display of the ƒ number in the electronic viewfinder, recording of focus/zoom position and ƒ number, and Peripheral Light Compensationi for more pleasing effects shots.

The versatility of image-capture options using Canon EOS digital cinema cameras can be further extended with Canon’s Super35mm top-end Cinema zoom lenses (the CN-E14.5-60mm T2.6 wide-angle and the CN-E30-300mm T2.95-3.7 telephoto) and compact Cinema zooms (the CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 wide-angle and CN-E30-105mm T2.8 telephoto). All four are available in both EF- and PL-mount versions, as are the EOS C500 and EOS C300 cameras. Almost all of Canon’s EF Series photographic lenses can also be used with these Cinema EOS cameras, including Image Stabilized zooms, tilt-shift models, and macro lenses. All of these products are designed to contribute to the continued advancement of tools for visual storytelling and all express Canon’s continuing commitment to cinematic culture.

Pricing and Availability

The CN-E14mm T3.1 L F single-focal-length lens is expected to be available in April 2013 for an estimated retail price of $5,500. The CN-E135mm T2.2 L F single-focal-length lens is expected to be available in May 2013 for an estimated retail price of $5,200.

Source: [CUSA]

A New Cinema EOS DSLR Body in 2013? [CR1]

A New Cinema EOS DSLR Body in 2013? [CR1]

Not just the EOS-1D C
There have been a few mentions of a new Cinema EOS DSLR body being announced in 2013. It would take on a smaller form factor than the EOS-1D C and would not shoot 4K video.

It wasn’t mentioned which DSLR it would be built around, but I think an APS-C Cinema EOS based around the upcoming EOS 7D replacement would be a good place to start.

The EOS-1D C has yet to reach the retail chain at the time of writing this, but it’s said to be arriving “very soon”.

From a new source, so take this with a grain of salt.

Preorder Canon EOS-1D C at B&H Photo $11,999

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World’s First EOS-1D C Motion Image Shoot

World’s First EOS-1D C Motion Image Shoot

From Untitled Film Works
Check out some of the work being done using the Canon EOS 1D C, the motion image results are pretty astonishing.

The art of motion image
“The art and skill of a photographer is still required when using a camera like the 1DC. Understanding and harnessing of light, composition and interaction with your subjects are all vital skills of a photographer and are not replaced by the idea of motion image capture. Photographers also use a variety of techniques to obtain unique looking images (like long exposure times and the use of remote flashes) these times of images would not be reproduced in video. I see the biggest step forward using motion image capture the ability to record many individual moments in time, all the while silently as there is no shutter being released. This could have great benefits in situations where you may want to remain more candid. Subjects could also feel more relaxed not knowing “photographs” are being taken.”

Read the entire article

Preorder Canon EOS-1D C at B&H Photo $11,999

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A Brief 2013 Canon Roadmap [CR1]

A Brief 2013 Canon Roadmap [CR1]

What’s in the pipeline
As always, things quiet down after an announcement. The two recently announced lenses seem to have generated quite a bit of talk, and that’s always good, even if a lot of it was negative towards the pricing. I hope to have both the EF 24-70 f/4L IS and EF 35 f/2 IS in the hands of our new reviewer sometime in December.

EOS
Two new DSLRs will be coming in the first quarter of 2013. Most likely APS-C cameras. Definitely a Rebel and most likely one of the 70D or 7D Mark II.

EOS-M
New lenses in Q1 of 2013 will be announced. Expect a fast prime and a telephoto lens. No mentions of a new EOS-M camera. We’re all hoping for a firmware update to improve the AF of the EOS-M.

Cinema EOS
Going with some previous reports, we’re told that new Cinema EOS lenses will be announced by the end of January. No cameras are in the immediate pipeline. We’re still waiting for the EOS 1D C to make it to market as well as the EOS C100.

The Big Megapixel Camera
They’re out there, announcement is unknown. It is definitely 40+ mp and will be geared to studio and landscape photographers. Apparently there’s lots of new technology in this upcoming body.

Same info received at [CW]

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The Canon EOS-1D C is Different Than the EOS-1D X on the Inside

The Canon EOS-1D C is Different Than the EOS-1D X on the Inside

The EOS-1D C isn’t just firmware
There have been reports around the web that the upcoming Canon EOS-1D C is the exact same camera internally as the EOS-1D X (other than the PC sync port) and Canon is just charging people $7000 for different firmware.

I have spent considerable time trying to find someone at Canon to clarify the reports as well as someone to open their EOS-1D C (no one would do that for me!). The information I have received backs up what Canon said at the development announcement of the EOS-1D C, it does in fact have a different hardware configuration inside. While the DIGIC V processors, image sensor and AF module are all identical to the EOS-1D C, there is in fact “reworked circuitry and design to dissipate heat for the 4K recording”.

So is the reworking of the internals worth the additional $7K? If it’s required for the 4K resolution, and the 4K performance is top notch, then I don’t see why it’s not. This camera is targeted to professionals and priced accordingly. Volume sales of this camera will be far lower than the EOS-1D X, which probably makes the cost of production higher.

There are a few people I know that will open the EOS-1D C when they get their hands on it, I know I will be. That’s going to be the only way to 100% prove the internals are indeed different. I do wish Canon would clarify this point and put it to rest, which they may do when the camera is officially announced.

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First Canon EOS C100 Short Hits the Web

From Planet5D
Mitch from Planet5D has informed us of the first short from the upcoming Canon EOS C100.

The Canon EOS C100 is almost “affordable”, and we should see lots of content from it. I’ll be buying one for my rental business, and hopefully I’ll learn something about shooting video. :)

Film Information (By Sebastien DEVAUD)
“Earlier this year, i was contacted by Canon Inc to create a new exclusive film for the worldwide launch of the new EOS Cinema camera : The EOS C100

Given the difficult task awaiting me, I decided to call upon and challenge the C’brothers to highlight and validate the strenghts of this new technology…

Join the new C generation !

Just C it ! was shot with three C100 bodies and 12 EF lenses. AVCHD compress recorded on SD Card”

Canon EOS C100 at B&H Photo (Available November 2012)

Source: [P5D]

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