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Gear Talk => EOS Bodies - For Stills => Topic started by: NostraHistoria on December 07, 2013, 03:04:33 PM

Title: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: NostraHistoria on December 07, 2013, 03:04:33 PM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: xvnm on December 07, 2013, 03:49:01 PM
Why would you sell a camera that you know is about to stop working? I don't think it is fair to the buyer. Ethics matters.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: alexanderferdinand on December 07, 2013, 04:54:09 PM
If you like it- keep it.
150.000 (I think entry-level last only 100.000) actuations the shutter should work.
Can be much more or less.
If you take some research in the net you find a page where user write in their number of actuations and if its still alive.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: bholliman on December 07, 2013, 05:00:07 PM
I would not sell the camera just because you have taken x number pictures.  If the shutter or something else fails, it can be replaced by Canon service for a fraction of the cost of a new camera.  Something may fail soon or it might be years.

Why would you sell a camera that you know is about to stop working? I don't think it is fair to the buyer. Ethics matters.

Its no different than selling a car with 100,000 miles on it.  Make sure the buyer understands how many shots have been taken with it.  Camera shutters are like any other mechanical device, nobody can accurately predict when they will fail.  Some shutters may last 100K actuations and others 250K or more. 
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Don Haines on December 07, 2013, 07:27:35 PM
Reminds me of an old car I once had..... 390,000 kilometers on it and it still worked well, but the resale value was zero. The resale value of a T3i with 150,000 pictures on it is almost nothing, but it does not mean the camera is worthless.... it should still work right up until it's shutter fails, be that tonight or in 3 years.. If it were me, and the camera did all that I wanted of it, I'd keep on using it, but If I were about to go on an epic journey with great photo opportunities somewhere where I could not pick up a new camera, I would start thinking of a new body.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Mt Spokane Photography on December 07, 2013, 09:45:54 PM
Shutter life is rated based on previous product history for items with a similar design.  I haven't seen any authoritative info on the T3i shutter life, but most of the Rebels were up to 100,000 actuations.  They last a little longer because they are limited to 1/4000 sec, otherwise I'd expect a shorter life.
In reality, a shutter may die after 1 use, or last for 10 million.  I wouldn't worry about it, all indications are that it might go for a million or more.  The ones that were going to fail have already failed.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Marsu42 on December 08, 2013, 03:22:37 AM
Should I sell it and get a new one now?

Looking at the current ebay sales, the information has sunk in that dslrs age according to shutter use, and most people volunteer this information freely or are asked about it as nowadays as it's easy to get the count... so if you want to sell it, this might be a good time as it didn't exceed the specified shutter cycles.

Canon only rates the cheaper cameras as 100.000, and that includes xxxd, xxd and the €1500 6d. But this a bit of marketing and you can get much more out of them, my 60d currently is at 150k and kicking. Note that very high shutter speeds age the shutter much faster, but you're unlikely to do action bursts with your Rebel all the time.

Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: rs on December 08, 2013, 03:54:18 AM
Shutter life is rated based on previous product history for items with a similar design.  I haven't seen any authoritative info on the T3i shutter life, but most of the Rebels were up to 100,000 actuations.  They last a little longer because they are limited to 1/4000 sec, otherwise I'd expect a shorter life.
In reality, a shutter may die after 1 use, or last for 10 million.  I wouldn't worry about it, all indications are that it might go for a million or more.  The ones that were going to fail have already failed.
If the camera industry is anything like the automotive industry, any new components (or systems) which are to make it into production will be subjected to a key life test. Basically, a pass/fail standard (including cycle counts) will be predefined, and an automated test procedure designed to replicate normal usage (I guess in the case of a shutter, the odd burst at the cameras max frame rate, many single shots, and a variety of typical shutter speeds, no doubt at various predefined environmental conditions), all with enough time to allow the system to cool/settle sufficiently between cycles. This will only take a couple of weeks to test. Any failure will result in going back to the drawing board. And as the design progresses, later builds which are a closer approximation to the production model might emerge, which should be subject to the same testing procedure.

So the shutter count is just a way of quantifying what the shutter is designed, engineered and tested to. It's a typical usage minimum, not a maximum.

Or, read this to get an idea how long your shutter could last: http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/ (http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/)
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Zv on December 08, 2013, 04:01:22 AM
Keep using it until it dies. If you sell it you should disclose the shutter count in which case not many will want to buy it and therefore you'll be selling it for pennies.

You can get the shutter replaced. I heard it's not that expensive. But you may as well put in a few hundred bucks more and get a better camera. I wouldn't bother replacing a rebel shutter. A 5D or 1D yeah definitely.

I think the 100,000 shot rating is just marketing thing and a safe amount to guarantee. It could potentially take ten times that many shots or maybe die after 100. Just use it until it gives out. You seem to have already gotten your moneys worth to be honest!
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Marsu42 on December 08, 2013, 04:08:00 AM
You can get the shutter replaced. I heard it's not that expensive.

Unfortunately in Germany, you pay about €70+ just for the certified technician to pick up the screwdriver, that's why I doubt it's "worth it" for an old xxxd or even xxd if you can get a less used one from ebay. Or is there a cheaper way to replace the shutter than with the official Canon service?

Or, read this to get an idea how long your shutter could last: http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/ (http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/)

Interesting read, looking at the 40d,50d,550d models it seems that if your shutter survives longer than the estimated rating (100k), it is likely to survive even much, much longer. The big question would be why - either these people got "lucky" and their hardware is better, or they shoot at lower shutter speeds or whatnot and there is a cause and effect.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: rs on December 08, 2013, 04:34:29 AM
Or, read this to get an idea how long your shutter could last: http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/ (http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/)

Interesting read, looking at the 40d,50d,550d models it seems that if your shutter survives longer than the estimated rating (100k), it is likely to survive even much, much longer. The big question would be why - either these people got "lucky" and their hardware is better, or they shoot at lower shutter speeds or whatnot and there is a cause and effect.
I'd guess environmental conditions play their part. Extreme temperatures push tolerances nearer their limits. Also situations like fast frame rates take their hit on the shutter due to some minor heat build up. However, time lapses might be one of the biggest killers, especially at reasonably fast rates such as two shots per second. After a typical time lapse of many hours, the heat build up, especially in high ambient conditions could really take their toll on the shutter.

The camera will be aimed at a particular market, and the components will be designed and engineered around that typical perceived usage. Step outside of that (such as with heavy timelapse usage with a rebel), and you're in uncharted territory.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Zv on December 08, 2013, 11:45:56 AM
Or, read this to get an idea how long your shutter could last: http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/ (http://petapixel.com/2012/12/22/look-up-your-cameras-lifespan-with-the-shutter-life-expectancy-database/)

Interesting read, looking at the 40d,50d,550d models it seems that if your shutter survives longer than the estimated rating (100k), it is likely to survive even much, much longer. The big question would be why - either these people got "lucky" and their hardware is better, or they shoot at lower shutter speeds or whatnot and there is a cause and effect.
I'd guess environmental conditions play their part. Extreme temperatures push tolerances nearer their limits. Also situations like fast frame rates take their hit on the shutter due to some minor heat build up. However, time lapses might be one of the biggest killers, especially at reasonably fast rates such as two shots per second. After a typical time lapse of many hours, the heat build up, especially in high ambient conditions could really take their toll on the shutter.

The camera will be aimed at a particular market, and the components will be designed and engineered around that typical perceived usage. Step outside of that (such as with heavy timelapse usage with a rebel), and you're in uncharted territory.

I feel sorry for the poor bastard who only got 2 clicks before the thing died!
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Marsu42 on December 08, 2013, 12:02:10 PM
I feel sorry for the poor bastard who only got 2 clicks before the thing died!

You'd rather feel sorry for the guy/gal who had 100001 clicks when it failed and had to pay the replacement her/himself :-p
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Mt Spokane Photography on December 08, 2013, 02:06:50 PM

Interesting read, looking at the 40d,50d,550d models it seems that if your shutter survives longer than the estimated rating (100k), it is likely to survive even much, much longer. The big question would be why - either these people got "lucky" and their hardware is better, or they shoot at lower shutter speeds or whatnot and there is a cause and effect.

That's pretty much standard for reliability.  A item that has already exceeded the average life is likely to keep on working much longer.  It usually means that the fit and alignment of the many small parts and bushings is ideal and can go on working.
 
What causes failure due to wear out is the tiny misalignment of parts so that motor bearings wear out, or other moving parts wear out.  If alignment is perfect, the life can be many times the average.
 
R&M engineers predict life of a assembly using a manual that lists reliability of each component based on known information, or calculated information.  Very seldom do they actually spend $500K to test a part.  For high reliability parts, there is accelerated life testing involved, but it comes down to extrapolation.  Its impossible to test rubber or plastic for a lifetime, or a motor bearing, they should last for 10 years - 1000 years.  That's why they are tested with high and low temperatures, under vibration and shock, etc.  In the end, life is a guess.  In the case of camera shutters, the design from one camera to another is either similar or identical, so the probable reliability numbers are well known.  They can construct a bathtub curve for a typical item.
 
The Japanese and many US industries have adopted a 6 sigma reliability process, I had to impose this on subcontractors for new components, and they resisted at first, but later found it paid back in fewer rejects and failures of expensive components.  Doing it for a part that is so dimensionally accurate that it can't be directly measured is difficult. 
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Marsu42 on December 08, 2013, 02:31:47 PM
They can construct a bathtub curve for a typical item.

Intersting, thanks for the description. The reason I was wondering is that I "natually" assumed a normal distribution around the predicted shutter life, but I now understand this is wrong because the public estimation wouldn't be the real internal estimation, and the curve is entirely different in technical items.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: zlatko on December 08, 2013, 05:05:23 PM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?
No, when the shutter breaks, have Canon fix it.  Then your camera is good for many more photos. 
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: pwp on December 08, 2013, 05:42:38 PM
There is an almost unhealthy obsession with shutter acctuations numbers. The factory quoted life expectancy of shutters under-reports like crazy. Like many mechanical devices from cameras, cars, HDD's, dishwashers etc, major failure is more likely to happen in the first few days than at any other time. I'm a very heavy shooter and have been for decades. The only shutters I have ever replaced were on a 5D3 which failed on day-one and was instantly replaced by Canon and the other was on a film EOS1n. I was in a bumpy media bus changing film and my thumb punched a hole in the shutter as we hit a pothole.

I had an old 20D and a 5D classic which both got given to assistants with shutter counts in the mid hundreds of thousands. They're both still going. 1-Series bodies in the hands of news/sports shooters will routinely be trusted to deliver the goods when showing shutter counts in the high hundreds of thousands and beyond.

We tend to shift cameras when they're plainly obsolete, broken, badly dropped or showing irritating characteristics. A bit of common sense is a good thing, I'd never turn up to a high budget job or even a modest budget job with only one body.

To the OP, if you like your current cameras and it delivers the goods for you, stay with it and stop fussing about the shutter.

-pw
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: agierke on December 08, 2013, 06:17:18 PM
shutter replacement is a relatively easy and inexpensive fix. got mine fixed for 200.00 after the shutter failed on my 5Dc at 180,000 actuations. came back good as new and is still going.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Ellen Schmidtee on December 08, 2013, 06:18:08 PM
Like many mechanical devices from cameras, cars, HDD's, dishwashers etc, major failure is more likely to happen in the first few days than at any other time.

Electronic devices have a fair share of infant death, and it's common enough in microprocessors for Intel to invest in tracking the problem and trying to avoid it.

Personally, I had an Intel Pentium fail during OS installation. Two shop owners told me they prefer to install windows for their customers just to make sure all the parts (installation media, CD drive, etc) work. The replacement worked for over five years.

Had to replace a brand name thumb drive the day I bought it. The replacement worked for close to a decade.


Which is why I recommend testing a new memory card before using it - low level format, a burst, a few seconds of video, and download the files. Better to spend a few minutes with each card, than losing a bunch of photos on that one in a million infant deaths.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: TexPhoto on December 08, 2013, 10:10:29 PM
I see a couple of people saying something to the effect of: "Note that very high shutter speeds age the shutter much faster,..."

I've never heard this and think it is a little funny.  You guys know the shutter blades move at the same speed for 4 second photos as they do for 1/4000 of a second right?  It is the gap, or time in between the blades moving that determines the shutter speed. 

Anyway to the original poster: good lord man, what dull reason to buy a new camera!  How about I want a new camera to do awesome things and take awesome pictures, I want to be inspired!  As others have said, you may get 100K more clicks or 10, thats life.  If you can afford it, get a 70D, move up in the world, and keep you trusty rebel as a back-up, an old and trusted friend, a camera to hand to you bored girlfriend on the trip to the grand Canyon...
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: pedro on December 08, 2013, 11:18:07 PM
Well, I purchased my 5D3 in August 2012. As I mostly do nightscapes (never did timelapses) I get home from my regional trips with less than 50 frames. Maybe this behaviour goes back to the film days, you had one roll of 36 or 24 slides and that was it. So one didn't fire off too many frames at a time. After about 16 month the shutter count of my device is at 8817. Last frame taken last night. At this rate it is good for at least another 15 years ;-) But I guess once a 5DV rolls out, I might use it less, hoping for better high ISO IQ (25k and 51k) in the overnext product cycle...till then I'll do my workouts with the finest camera I've ever had. Only better high ISOs in an upcoming model can prevent me from using it on a regular base. As I rarely take more than 200 pics during extreme shooting (holidays can get as high as 500 frames), it will last for quite some time.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: scottkinfw on December 09, 2013, 01:11:25 AM
If you are using this camera, you are happy with it, and it is meeting your needs, keep it until it no longer doesn't.  Then, either keep it as a backup, or give it away, or sell it with full disclosure.  If on the other hand, you are thinking, time to get a new camera, and sounds like it might be near the end of life, well, maybe you just have the bug to buy a new camera?

Whatever you do, I agree that ethics do matter.  It is a character thing.

Scott

I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Marsu42 on December 09, 2013, 01:38:06 AM
I've never heard this and think it is a little funny.  You guys know the shutter blades move at the same speed for 4 second photos as they do for 1/4000 of a second right?  It is the gap, or time in between the blades moving that determines the shutter speed.

It's Canon *Rumor* for a reason, right :-p ?

I've picked up the "high shutter speed" theory along the way, and as you note several people did so without anyone objecting yet. The theory as far as I remember is that the shutter blades stop more sudden at higher shutter speeds, meaning the exact difference of your statement that's it's the same speed in any case.

I know that the shutter mechanism works differently on different models, on Rebels the shutter movement is coupled to the mirror while on xxd+ it's independent. It would be nice to get more input about this, because I'm actually trying to avoid the highest shutter speeds for this reason.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Maven on December 09, 2013, 01:39:55 AM
You can get the shutter replaced. I heard it's not that expensive.
I look at service center price: shutter replacement 600D = 182$
I think they may "insist" on camera diagnostics (50$) and cleaning (25$).
It's half the price of a new body. And if some electronics goes off later, or broken usb ports, or LCD - it's cheaper to buy new body from the start.
IMO if selling price + repairs is more than new body, keeping it until it breaks completely is pointless, unless you want to keep money and wait for new model, but need a camera right now and will take that risk.
I've seen used 5D2 with 170K shutter (some pics in series of shots - just black), burned USB-port (only using card reader) and some other things. It was in working condition, but repairing cost was more than 1200$.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: dolina on December 09, 2013, 02:39:21 AM
I'd get a new camera everytime I "need" a new one. All four of my bodies are 4ish years old. If I start shooting as frequently as once a week I may upgrade all of em to the next bodies Canon will release.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: verysimplejason on December 09, 2013, 04:15:10 AM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?

In my opinion, you only sell your camera if fixing its shutter is worth more or near than selling it or if you upgrade substantially (like from APS-C to full frame or from a rebel type AF to a better AF due to a requirement).  As I quote a Filipino photographer, Anthony Barlan,

"It’s not about how expensive your gear is, either. Good photographers could still take breath-taking pictures even with just their cell phones. Photography is about your creative use of your imagination, your ability to see a picture in your mind’s eye even before you capture it in your camera; it’s about your willingness to capture interesting subjects thru skills that you need to continuously work on. So always remember to “invest in your skills; not your gear”.

Some of his work here for inspiration...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthonybarlan (http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthonybarlan)
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: pedro on December 09, 2013, 06:03:56 AM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?

In my opinion, you only sell your camera if fixing its shutter is worth more or near than selling it or if you upgrade substantially (like from APS-C to full frame or from a rebel type AF to a better AF due to a requirement).  As I quote a Filipino photographer, Anthony Barlan,

"It’s not about how expensive your gear is, either. Good photographers could still take breath-taking pictures even with just their cell phones. Photography is about your creative use of your imagination, your ability to see a picture in your mind’s eye even before you capture it in your camera; it’s about your willingness to capture interesting subjects thru skills that you need to continuously work on. So always remember to “invest in your skills; not your gear”.

Some of his work here for inspiration...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthonybarlan (http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthonybarlan)

This is a great quote by a higly gifted pro. And I'd say he's dead on with it. I allowed myself to post this to my fb, mentioning canonrumor.com as source.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: ajfotofilmagem on December 09, 2013, 06:17:19 AM
The shutter mechanism can last much longer than the expected lifetime, but it is a lottery in which only a few are rewarded. At the time of the photographic film, the durability of a camera was measured in decades. Considering a wedding photographer who worked moderately with his camera, he could use 10 rolls of film per week, or 520 rolls per year (520 X 36 = 18720). Therefore, the 1-year period the camera could make 18720 shots, and at 10 years 187.200. However, at that time the flash sync speed was around 1/60, and rarely wore faster than 1/200, since the ISO was low. Remember that cameras had no weather sealing, and much dirt came from the back cover every time you changed the film.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: NostraHistoria on December 11, 2013, 07:28:21 PM
I sold it and I got a new T3i. The difference in picture quality is dramatic. I am not sure if there was dust in the sensor or the camera was just worn out, but the old one was producing poor pictures. Great move on my part.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Zv on December 11, 2013, 08:35:04 PM
I sold it and I got a new T3i. The difference in picture quality is dramatic. I am not sure if there was dust in the sensor or the camera was just worn out, but the old one was producing poor pictures. Great move on my part.

Let me get this straight - so you replaced your old but still functioning T3i with a new T3i because the old one had a high shutter count? And now you see a difference in image quality and blame it on dust?

Why didn't you just clean the sensor? And if you did decide to buy an new camera why did you get the exact same model? Why not a T4i?
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: IMG_0001 on December 11, 2013, 08:52:48 PM
A little late in the thread now that the OP bought a new camera but still...

I think that an often overlooked bit of information about warranties and reliability claims from manufacturers is that an overwhelming majority of the device population is required to exceed the claimed life expectancy in order to avoid costly replacement under warranty. It can therefore be expected that the claimed life expectancy would actually be that of the weakest fraction of the population that survived child death. In other words, don't worry too much if you are a hobbyist.

Regardsq
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: NostraHistoria on December 11, 2013, 10:09:22 PM
I sold it and I got a new T3i. The difference in picture quality is dramatic. I am not sure if there was dust in the sensor or the camera was just worn out, but the old one was producing poor pictures. Great move on my part.

Let me get this straight - so you replaced your old but still functioning T3i with a new T3i because the old one had a high shutter count? And now you see a difference in image quality and blame it on dust?

Why didn't you just clean the sensor? And if you did decide to buy an new camera why did you get the exact same model? Why not a T4i?

I did not look into the T4i, but the T5i does not make better pictures according to one site I read. I am waiting for the new 1DX to come out. If it will have over 20 MP, I will probably get it.

As for the sensor cleaning, I am not sure if that was the problem or what. However, I am still new to DSLRs. My first camera was an old Canon with maybe 3MP. In 2007, I got the Canon TX1. In 2010, I got the Canon SX210 IS. In 2012, I got the T3i. The flagship is next.

I will check out cleaning my sensor in the future. I simply never heard of anyone doing before.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Zv on December 11, 2013, 11:27:30 PM
I sold it and I got a new T3i. The difference in picture quality is dramatic. I am not sure if there was dust in the sensor or the camera was just worn out, but the old one was producing poor pictures. Great move on my part.

Let me get this straight - so you replaced your old but still functioning T3i with a new T3i because the old one had a high shutter count? And now you see a difference in image quality and blame it on dust?

Why didn't you just clean the sensor? And if you did decide to buy an new camera why did you get the exact same model? Why not a T4i?

I did not look into the T4i, but the T5i does not make better pictures according to one site I read. I am waiting for the new 1DX to come out. If it will have over 20 MP, I will probably get it.

As for the sensor cleaning, I am not sure if that was the problem or what. However, I am still new to DSLRs. My first camera was an old Canon with maybe 3MP. In 2007, I got the Canon TX1. In 2010, I got the Canon SX210 IS. In 2012, I got the T3i. The flagship is next.

I will check out cleaning my sensor in the future. I simply never heard of anyone doing before.

It's very easy to do. Remove the lens and then switch on the camera. Go to menu settings under one of the yellow tabs is an option for sensor cleaning. There's an option to do it manually and it basically flips up the mirror so you can see the sensor. You can do an easy blow air into it method via compressed air or use a cleaning kit if it's really filthy. When done just switch the camera off and the mirror flips down.

It cost's like $10 - 20 to have it cleaned at a shop. They do the exact same thing.

There are Youtube videos for how to do it.

To check wether you need to clean it first just take a picture of a white sheet of paper (make sure the paper is spotless!) and set aperture to f/22. Try defocusing using MF. Then upload to your PC and check every part of the image for dark spots. Zoom in to get a better look. Dark spots = dust and grime.

It goes without saying but I will anyway - make sure the lenses are clean and you are not using a filter.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: thgmuffin on December 12, 2013, 02:29:09 AM
I sold it and I got a new T3i. The difference in picture quality is dramatic. I am not sure if there was dust in the sensor or the camera was just worn out, but the old one was producing poor pictures. Great move on my part.

Let me get this straight - so you replaced your old but still functioning T3i with a new T3i because the old one had a high shutter count? And now you see a difference in image quality and blame it on dust?

Why didn't you just clean the sensor? And if you did decide to buy an new camera why did you get the exact same model? Why not a T4i?

I did not look into the T4i, but the T5i does not make better pictures according to one site I read. I am waiting for the new 1DX to come out. If it will have over 20 MP, I will probably get it.

As for the sensor cleaning, I am not sure if that was the problem or what. However, I am still new to DSLRs. My first camera was an old Canon with maybe 3MP. In 2007, I got the Canon TX1. In 2010, I got the Canon SX210 IS. In 2012, I got the T3i. The flagship is next.

I will check out cleaning my sensor in the future. I simply never heard of anyone doing before.

I hope your rotating lens hood is serving you well :P

Also, I'm pretty sure you remember that your EF-S lenses won't work on the 1D series...

Especially if you're only taking pictures of books  :P
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: AcutancePhotography on December 12, 2013, 11:37:54 AM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i.

I just have to ask, what are you photographing that you are averaging over 200 pictures every day of the year?

Yikes!
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: NostraHistoria on December 12, 2013, 12:38:33 PM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i.

I just have to ask, what are you photographing that you are averaging over 200 pictures every day of the year?

Yikes!

Books six days a week. I think I have over 1.5TB of pics of books.

When I go out taking pictures, I take anywhere from 100 to 1000 pics in one day. It all adds up.

Selling the camera was the smartest move. Now, I have a new camera,  warranty, and superior pictures. Now, all Canon has to do is release a super upgraded 1DX so I can sell this T3i and buy the new 1DX.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: thgmuffin on December 14, 2013, 04:23:24 AM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i.

I just have to ask, what are you photographing that you are averaging over 200 pictures every day of the year?

Yikes!

Books six days a week. I think I have over 1.5TB of pics of books.

When I go out taking pictures, I take anywhere from 100 to 1000 pics in one day. It all adds up.

Selling the camera was the smartest move. Now, I have a new camera,  warranty, and superior pictures. Now, all Canon has to do is release a super upgraded 1DX so I can sell this T3i and buy the new 1DX.

Why do pictures of books require a 1DX type camera that is made for sports/professional work?

If I were taking pictures of books I'd want a high MP with good quality stuff. Something like a 6D/5D MK III will serve you well...

Plus you can use that extra $4000 saved for the sharpest lenses.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: bholliman on December 14, 2013, 07:58:34 AM
Why do pictures of books require a 1DX type camera that is made for sports/professional work?

If I were taking pictures of books I'd want a high MP with good quality stuff. Something like a 6D/5D MK III will serve you well...

Plus you can use that extra $4000 saved for the sharpest lenses.

+1  the 6D is plenty of camera for shooting books.  You didn't go into detail about what you shoot beyond books, but a 6D will serve you very well if you are shooting primarily landscapes and portraits and not a high percentage of sports, fast action or birds in flight.  The 5D3 is a step up from the 6D with the most notable difference a superior AF system and excellent all-around camera.

The 1D series cameras are awesome and most of us would love to own one.  The AF system, build and features are all professional level.  If you have the money and want one, go for it!  I just don't see any real "need" for a 1D camera given your list of intended uses.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: ajfotofilmagem on December 14, 2013, 10:37:42 AM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i.

I just have to ask, what are you photographing that you are averaging over 200 pictures every day of the year?
Yikes!
Books six days a week. I think I have over 1.5TB of pics of books.
When I go out taking pictures, I take anywhere from 100 to 1000 pics in one day. It all adds up.
Selling the camera was the smartest move. Now, I have a new camera,  warranty, and superior pictures. Now, all Canon has to do is release a super upgraded 1DX so I can sell this T3i and buy the new 1DX.
Looks like our friend Customized Macs (who changed his name) continues photographing books. Nothing wrong with that. However, he continues to ignore the recommendations of the majority of members CR. Why does he keep asking if it will always ignore the answers and do the opposite of what was recommended? Want to buy 1DX for photographing books? Great, go ahead because it's your money. But do not talk out there that the CR community has recommended 1DX for the use you intend. Do not say that the CR community told you that the most expensive camera is always the most suitable for any job. Do not talk that the lens is an item of little importance, because the best camera that will do there best picture, regardless of the lens. Do not talk that the best camera alone will make more accurate adjustments of the photographer behind her. Honestly, for the use you describe seems to me that Nikon D800E + 85mm F1.4 would give you more details to pixel peeper. Even if money is no problem, even so for the job you want 1DX is not the best camera. Do not forget that EF- S lenses do not work on 1DX. However, good news is that the new Canon 18-55mm STM, was designed specifically for use petal-type lens hood, it looks quite cool.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: stringfellow1946 on December 14, 2013, 12:14:38 PM
Canon suggested Shutter counts are total rubbish. I had a 1DS Mk3 that the shutter failed at 47000 actuations (canon checked). Yet canon would have us believe that the 1DS Mk3 is good for 250000 actuations, yea right!!
Yours ain’t broke so don’t fix, mine was broke so I got it fixed it. SIMPLES
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: rs on December 14, 2013, 01:17:25 PM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i.

I just have to ask, what are you photographing that you are averaging over 200 pictures every day of the year?

Yikes!

Books six days a week. I think I have over 1.5TB of pics of books.

When I go out taking pictures, I take anywhere from 100 to 1000 pics in one day. It all adds up.

Selling the camera was the smartest move. Now, I have a new camera,  warranty, and superior pictures. Now, all Canon has to do is release a super upgraded 1DX so I can sell this T3i and buy the new 1DX.
Hold on a sec - you spend your working day, 6 days a week committing plagiarism? You've previously described these books as being just ordinary books - so what are you doing? Even if its to avoid paying for them, you've got library fees to pay, lighting, all the equipment, plus a camera. Which by my reckoning lasted in your own hands just 300 books. Your flashes must be at the end of their life too. So how much is that costing you per book?

And that's before even taking into account your time (a whole year for 300 books) and the end result - 1.5 TB of pixelated, questionably lit, framed and limited DoF, unorganised, large jpegs. I challenge anyone else to have the patience to read one your illegal copies!

You do know you can buy books in pdf and ebook format, sometimes with great discounts? You could buy your years supply of 300 books for less than your current yearly budget, in just a few minutes online. And then you could spend the rest of the year doing a real job, earning real money, and not breaking the law. Although if you want to carry on stealing creative work, why not download the books from a torrent site, reducing your outgoings to zero.

Also, have you considered the file size of a pdf book or an ebook in comparison? Or how simple it is to pick up on any page? Bookmark it? Or how about how all the text is in focus, shadow free? And how you can keep zooming in and it never pixelates? And also read it on a tablet/ebook reader or even a phone?

Sorry - you're obviously enjoying being a photographer. Get your high MP 1 series body when its released. It'll be so much better than downloading ebooks. And it might even last you 600 books!
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Lichtgestalt on December 14, 2013, 04:50:26 PM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?

so your buyer gets a camera that probably don´t make it for long?
you can always have the shutter replaced.

Quote
Make sure the buyer understands how many shots have been taken with it.

yeah well.... as if that´s the case when someone sells stuff on ebay.   ;D

but it would be nice if canon makes it easier to read out the shutter count.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Lichtgestalt on December 14, 2013, 04:58:12 PM
Canon suggested Shutter counts are total rubbish. I had a 1DS Mk3 that the shutter failed at 47000 actuations (canon checked). Yet canon would have us believe that the 1DS Mk3 is good for 250000 actuations, yea right!!
Yours ain’t broke so don’t fix, mine was broke so I got it fixed it. SIMPLES


boy read a book about statistics.  ::)
your single person experience means nothing.

others have cameras where the shutter holds for more then twice or triple the specified actuations.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: thgmuffin on December 14, 2013, 06:50:39 PM
Canon suggested Shutter counts are total rubbish. I had a 1DS Mk3 that the shutter failed at 47000 actuations (canon checked). Yet canon would have us believe that the 1DS Mk3 is good for 250000 actuations, yea right!!
Yours ain’t broke so don’t fix, mine was broke so I got it fixed it. SIMPLES


boy read a book about statistics.  ::)
your single person experience means nothing.

others have cameras where the shutter holds for more then twice or triple the specified actuations.

I can't wait to take AP statistics in 2 years.  ::)
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: IMG_0001 on December 20, 2013, 02:17:26 PM
Canon suggested Shutter counts are total rubbish. I had a 1DS Mk3 that the shutter failed at 47000 actuations (canon checked). Yet canon would have us believe that the 1DS Mk3 is good for 250000 actuations, yea right!!
Yours ain’t broke so don’t fix, mine was broke so I got it fixed it. SIMPLES


boy read a book about statistics.  ::)
your single person experience means nothing.

others have cameras where the shutter holds for more then twice or triple the specified actuations.

I can't wait to take AP statistics in 2 years.  ::)

My experience says that 19 times out of 20, 94% of the population aged between 18 and 34 does not care about statistics and that from the remaining 6%, 33% care because they don't understand.

Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: grahamclarkphoto on January 14, 2014, 06:58:56 PM
I take about 78,000 pictures every year with my T3i. I read that entry-level DSLRs can take about 150,000 pictures. I have had mine for about two years. So, it may have taken over 150,000 pictures. Should I sell it and get a new one now?

My Canon 6D has 250,000 shutter actuations right now, in just over a year of use.

Why so many? Star trail & time-lapse photography. I was also doing in-depth battery testing for an article on battery performance, so I used the 6D to conduct the tests.

In short, the shutter rating is a warranty thing and it also serves as a marketing tactic.

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=19066 (http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=19066)

Graham
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: Marsu42 on January 15, 2014, 06:33:35 AM
My Canon 6D has 250,000 shutter actuations right now, in just over a year of use. Why so many? Star trail & time-lapse photography.

Good to know the 6d keeps running :-) ...rumor is the shutter speed used (very fast = bad) has an influence on shutter wear, though atm I really wouldn't know about this since there were so diverging opinions on this.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: verysimplejason on February 21, 2014, 11:21:45 PM
Convert it to an IR camera.  I love IR photography and I'd get one soon. 
Some pictures of my favorite IR pics...

http://versi.myinfrared.com/ (http://versi.myinfrared.com/)

You can also use it as a backup.  If you're like me, you won't sell a camera which gave you a lot of memories already.  At best, if it were me, I'd look for a person who's totally in love with photography but is unable to do so due to lack of funds. That way, your camera will still be cherished till its life's end.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: SambalOelek on February 27, 2014, 06:44:28 AM
I hope your rotating lens hood is serving you well :P

This. I am very interested to hear how the petal hood turned out.
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: musket3 on April 15, 2014, 11:37:58 AM
Here is some interesting information about this subject from a Canon repair tech.  http://www.reddit.com/r/photography/comments/aywqq/im_a_canon_dslr_repair_technician_questions/ (http://www.reddit.com/r/photography/comments/aywqq/im_a_canon_dslr_repair_technician_questions/)
Title: Re: Get a new camera every 150,000 pictures?
Post by: mackguyver on April 15, 2014, 11:55:44 AM
Here is some interesting information about this subject from a Canon repair tech.  http://www.reddit.com/r/photography/comments/aywqq/im_a_canon_dslr_repair_technician_questions/ (http://www.reddit.com/r/photography/comments/aywqq/im_a_canon_dslr_repair_technician_questions/)
Welcome to CR and thanks for the interesting link.