August 30, 2014, 04:39:40 AM

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Messages - dppaskewitz

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 8
1
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L For Sale
« on: August 16, 2014, 10:02:20 AM »
Dear Surapon,

Here is your chance!!!!!

Regards, DPP

2
Post Processing / Re: Smart objects
« on: August 07, 2014, 12:38:40 PM »
Does anyone know:  do smart objects work the same way as editing in LR, where the edits are commands stored in a separate XMP file so that your underlying RAW file is never changed?  Sounds like Adobe took that from LR and built it into PS?

I don't edit in PS very often (I have the CC version but really haven't started to learn how to use it).  My workflow (if I can dignify what I do with such a term) is to import everything into LR, figure out which photos I want to work on, edit in LR, then if I think PS would be useful (mostly so far only for content aware fill to get rid of stuff) I use "edit in PS" and create a Tiff from the photo (with the LR edits) for that purpose.  Sound like I should edit the LR adjusted photo as a smart object in PS.  If I understand correctly, that would just be adding further commands to the XMP file and I wouldn't end up with so many versions of the same photo.  Does this make sense to anyone? 

OK, I have some tutorials to watch.  Thanks for the links.

3
Post Processing / Re: Merging Multiple Exposures
« on: August 06, 2014, 10:49:17 PM »
Nice work, but, as a photographer, it does not look real.  It reminds me of TV shows where they green screen a outdoor scene or a person doing weather.  Something in my brain sees it and says its not real.

Please don't take offense, I referring to the process in general, not to your specific work

I agree it doesn't necessarily look "natural," but I think for the purpose (which I take to be showing both interior and view in a single image to sell real estate) the technique provides a great result.

My innocent question:  how much different would the final result look if done in something like Photomatix and selecting the "natural" profile?  I ask because I have used Photomatix and have, on occasion, achieved OK results.  Wondering if it would be worthwhile to up my game by learning the procedure you describe in PS CC (like Michael, I am pretty new to PS and would love a step by step).

4
Canon General / Re: What is your Least Used Piece of Gear?
« on: August 05, 2014, 10:51:15 PM »

Now it is the 300F2.8.  I use the longer glass - this is for my wife to use if she wants a mini-great white :)

Man, you've got a great supportive wife. My wife would say "why do you need another lens"?

I got my wife hooked on photography.  Now she says, "Can we buy another lens?"   ;)

I've tried.  I've really tried.  How did you do it?

5
Thanks for your input.  I'm learning.  My comments below in RED.

Great stuff, thanks.

A few responses:

  • I always forget about back button AF.  I'm too stubborn to switch, but yes, that would cleverly solve the shutter button refocus problem I referred to.  On my 6D, I have Custom Function III as one of my options on ""My menu settings."  Makes switching out of back button focusing (by enabling shutter button metering and focusing) relatively easy.  I imagine other modern cameras would have similar.  Not so much on my old 5D.

  • ND 3.0 = 10 stops, right?  That's 2^10 (i.e. 1,024) times less light getting through, so that's your shutter speed multiplier, isn't it?  My phone app says 1000x for a 3.0 ND, and the Lee card would seem to corroborate that:  http://www.speedgraphic.co.uk/Portals/1/product/images/prd8e36ed5a-8cf0-430f-a76c-22bcdd6e3154.jpg  It took me a while, but now I get it.  Simply multiply 1024 by the shutter speed without the Big Stopper to get the exposure time with the Big Stopper.  Since most of the shutter speeds without are really fractions of 1 over something, the actual calculation is to divide 1024 by the denominator of the shutter speed (e.g., divide 1024 by 250 for a shutter speed of 1/250th, yielding an exposure time of roughly 4 seconds, which is in accord with the Lee card).  And then divide by sixty to get minutes, if that is helpful in keeping track of the time.  Good to know in the field if the cell phone app isn't working and the Lee card is somewhere else. 

  • "Inputting ISO and aperture" means that I leave M or Av mode (whatever mode I framed the shot in) and go to Bulb.  Switching settings (especially away from Av) often moves things back to what I last shot manually, which usually means I lose my settings.  I have to do to bulb usually b/c my exposures are often longer than 30 seconds and all modes other than Bulb caps at 30s, I thought.  Bulb mode is basically M without a shutter speed input, so all you need is ISO and aperture -- that's where the statement came from.
  Right you are.  On the 6D, when I switch from M (my framing, focusing and aperture setting mode) to B (for shots over 30 seconds),  the ISO appears to stay the same as set in M (which makes sense) but as you note, the aperture changes to whatever aperture I had set when last using B, not what I had last set in M.  Thanks for the reminder.

- A

6
Canon General / Re: What is your Least Used Piece of Gear?
« on: July 31, 2014, 05:29:40 PM »

3) a 2nd big stopper filter that is waiting for the first one to break


I too ended up with two Big Stoppers.  I ordered from two sources back when they were scarce.  I figured I could always sell one of them.  Now, despite Neuro's advice that I should have a spare (which I wouldn't be carrying anyway), I need to get around to selling it.

7
sorry for stupid question but if i put a 10stop nd filter and a CPL i cant see anything what do you do to find out how much to turn the CPL for example to remove reflections in water?

You need to do is rotate your CPL until you achieve the desired result, then put your 10 stop ND filter in.  A 10 stop ND filter is always last to go in after you have set up your composition and adjusted any needed filters as you can't see anything after it is in front of your lens.

That's correct.  My approach (noting I've only used mine about 5 times) is below, and any comments/feedback would be welcomed:

1) I scout the shot handheld and then set up.  Tripod, cable release, Lee ring & holder, etc.

2) Switch to M, Av, Tv mode -- whatever you prefer.  ISO 100*.  Always shoot RAW with the Big Stopper -- many have a color shift that you need to back out in post, and RAW gives you a greater ability to do that.  For a host of reasons, I switch to manual focus before doing anything.  (Forgetting to do this later can burn you when the Big Stopper is in place.)  I never remember to do this, but this is where I should cover the optical viewfinder for the odd risk of light leak.

3) In LiveView, I frame up everything the way I want it.  Everything but the Big Stopper should be in place (CPL, ND Grad perhaps, etc.) and rotated / located the way I want it.  I won't get into composition as I'm a rookie on that front, but on the technical side of things, I usually opt to manually focus at 10x zoom 1/3 of the way into the frame as many landscapers recommend.

4) If LiveView is showing me what I want to see in the shot (minus the long exposure the Big Stopper will give me), I write down or remember my aperture and ISO settings.

5) I put my Big Stopper in.  My new shutter speed will be whatever I had before times 2^10 = 1024.  (Note this is a rough number and that your specific Big Stopper may vary a bit -- you'll learn this as you shoot with it.)  You can do the math yourself, read the card that came with your Big Stopper, or just get an ND filter app for your phone.

6) I usually just switch to Bulb mode, but you technically don't have to if the computed time is under 30 seconds -- you can use M mode then.  I input the ISO and aperture from LiveView, and I take the shot with a cable release (in the locked position) and a timer on my phone.  I haven't invested in an cable release with a built-in timer, but that is an option as well.

*I'd imagine that you don't always want 1,024x slowdown and buttery blending.  But if you don't have standalone ND filters that are less strong than the Big Stopper, could you cheat and push ISO up to speed up the shot in Step 4, and by extension, take a much shorter final exposure, right? I know jacking up ISO is heresy for a landscape shooter, but it is possible, right?

Feedback appreciated if there is an easier/better way to use the Big Stopper, thanks!

- A

I am by no means an expert.  I have used other NDs more than the Big Stopper, but the principles are pretty much the same.  I concur with you and have only a few additional thoughts.

I use M mode almost all the time (except, for example, from a moving train), because that is what I am getting used to (makes much more sense to me than exposure compensation, for example).  I suppose Av would also work, but that seems to me to be an extra step, once the aperture is set in M anyway.  Concur on RAW (if using LR, I don't see the need to shoot anything else).  I use back button focus.  Then, if I remember not to push the back button after focusing, however I have focused (that is, using either camera mode or tweaking with the focus ring in Live View), I am set with focus and don't need to switch back and forth to manual focus.

I do use 100 ISO unless I am using other NDs than the Big Stopper, for example 2 stops plus 3 stops, and need another stop slower.  Then I use 50 ISO.  I haven't thought of or tried your idea of pushing ISO and adjusting exposure time.

I tend to use an app to check depth of field because my eyesight isn't great.  I do use live view and 10X magnification when possible (i.e., when there isn't a glare problem I can't overcome).

I don't follow you on the shutter speed being 1024 times whatever the camera said without the Big Stopper (at set ISO and aperture).  I find either the Big Stopper card or a phone app. will give the answer.

I'm not sure what you mean by inputting the ISO and aperture.  Aren't those already in the camera?  Don't you just adjust the shutter speed by the 10 stops (or so, depending on your Big Stopper)?

I've been just counting out the seconds when I need to go to bulb, but the EXIF data generally tells me I got it wrong (I didn't give it as much time as I thought I did), so I like your idea of using the cell phone timer.  Or investing in a cable release with timer (so many gadgets, so little money).

DPP

8
Canon General / Re: What is your Least Used Piece of Gear?
« on: July 31, 2014, 11:39:45 AM »
My 50 1.4.  I tend to use the 24-105 more often.  When I want to go smallish, it's the 40 pancake.

9
Instead of adapting for and purchasing a 105mm CPL, just get a 4x4 CPL from Lee or other mfgs...

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/216637-REG/LEE_Filters_PLC_G_4x4_Circular_Polarizer_Glass.html

This solution requires two Lee foundation kits that rotate independently (so you can align your grad and CPL independently of one another).  If I recall correctly other posts on this topic, you end up with a vignetting issue when you get down to UWAs.  If I'm wrong, I would be happy to know that.

10
My test setup:
5d Mark II, tripod mounted, 18" away, EF 16-35mm f/4L IS, shooting at f/8, B+W 77mm XS-Pro 007 front filter, Lee wide-angle adaptor, Lee holder with two slots, 105mm ring, and a B+W Extra Wide KSM Circular Polarizer.

My results were the same; it vignettes ever so slightly at 19mm and is completely clear by 20mm. Removing just the 77mm XS-Pro 007, I have the same ever-so-slight vignetting at 17mm and it's clear at 18mm.

If you want the maximum usable range on your 16-35mm with the CPL attached, get the Extra Wide CPL from B+W and remove the protective front filer: vignette-free from 18-35mm. If you insist on keeping the protective front filter on, just understand that you're limiting yourself to 20-35mm.

As has been mentioned, you can always carry a second Lee holder with only one slot. I've got no vignetting at 16mm with B+W 007, wide angle adaptor, Lee holder with one slot, 105mm ring, and the B+W EW CPL. You'll just have to decide between long exposure and balanced lighting.

Very informative.  Thank you.  I think you just cost me something north of $500 (B+W 105 Extra Wide CPL, 105 mm ring and extra Lee holder (for one slot only).  I have been on the fence, but this seems to be the way to go.  Oh, and that's not counting the difference between what I get for my 17-40 and what the 16-35 F4 costs me.

11
Landscape / Re: my steam locomotive/railroad/trains photography
« on: July 23, 2014, 10:34:32 AM »
I am also a railroad enthusiast.  (I am attending a Santa Fe convention this week.)  I have looked at many photographs of trains.  I have taken several (thousands) myself.  Yours are up there with the very best.  Your opening slide show is a great way to present some of them.  Great website.  And welcome to CR.

12
If Canon is listening.......................  Touch screen is nice, but there has to be a way to turn it off and on without turning off the camera.  I am getting to like the touch screen on the M, but if you leave the camera on and the camera bounces around, all your settings have changed.

Did they use a resistive touchscreen or something?

I don't know what type of touchscreen it is.  Or what kinds exist.  But, so far as I know, there is no way to turn it off on the M. So, if you have the M on and bouncing around as you move, some of the settings will change (and you of course don't know which ones).  So I have made it a habit of just turning the camera off between shots when I carry it, but would much prefer being able to leave it on, use the rudimentary controls to take quick shots and then be able to turn the touch on and off quickly to access other settings, etc.

On my cell phone, I use an app called Strava when biking.  It uses GPS, etc., to track your route and tell you things like miles traveled, altitude gained, etc.  (a nice, free app for those who like to keep track of where they have gone when hiking or biking).  Anyway, in a recent update, they added a feature that turns the touch screen off on the phone after the app starts accumulating data.  So, no inadvertent entries when you stick your phone in a pocket or whatever while biking.  An easy swipe when you are done restarts the touch screen and you are good to go.  Seems it wouldn't be hard to add to the M  (maybe Magic Lantern has done it already?)

Sorry, not trying to hijack the thread.......................................

13
Software & Accessories / Re: Lee Big Stpper with UV filters
« on: July 19, 2014, 02:04:50 PM »
Not completely relevant to the thread, but I said I'd follow up. Like the 17-40mm f/4L, the 16-35mm f/4L IS has no vignetting at 20mm and above with an B+W XS-Pro clear filter, wide angle Lee adaptor, Lee filter holder with two slots and a 105mm adaptor, and a B+W 105mm extra wide circular polarizer. My 24-70mm f/4L IS is good at 24mm.

I'm curious whether you can go below 20 mm with either the 17-40 or 16-35 f/4 if you take the clear filter off before attaching Lee wide angle adaptor/holder/105mm adaptor and B+W 105mm extra wide CPL (I take it this is the one that is 105mm on the attaching side, and larger on the side towards the subject)?

It would be useful to know for those who do go bare when using the Lee system (and I have been one of them - although I confess I have been using the CPL between lens and Lee and have gotten it to work sortof - not well).

I did a quick test on my 17-40 with Lee holder, 2 slots, with 105mm ring attached. Oh and to answer the question what 105mm cirpol I'm using look at the picture  ;)

All images shot at F8 against a whiteish wall, I've overexposed them somewhat to get rid of the shadows on the wall. The ones taken with the cirpol has a four time longer shutter speed to account for loosing about 2-stops with the cirpol.

First image is taken at 17mm with just the filter holder attached to the lens, so there is no vignetting from the 105mm filter ring attachment.
Image number two is at 17mm with the cirpol on, obvious vignetting.
Number 3 at 20mm with cirpol, slight vignetting in the corner.
Number 4 at 21mm no vignetting visible.

Edit: Oh, the order got messed up, but I guess you can read the filename for each image. Sorry about that.

MRO:

Thanks for the info.  Are you using the Lee 77mm wide angle (W/A) adapter ring, or the standard one (Lee 77mm Std)?  Just curious. 

Thanks, DPP

14
EOS-M / Re: Arca Swiss plate for EOS M
« on: July 19, 2014, 01:56:40 PM »
OR, Tiny EOS-M with EF 600 Lens + 2X Extender, for the Birds Photography.
Enjoy
Surapon

Thank you for this.  Anyone with a 1200mm mounted on an M (or the other way around)? 

15

For those stuck with a style of LCD they do not prefer, would you pay a typical Canon markup price for an add-on like a grip or wireless speedlite transmitter (let's say $300) to have the option to dismount your current LCD 'module' for one with the functionality you prefer?  Let's presume is was quick-connect-like and could be changed out in a matter of seconds (like a lens).

Would you own more than one and change them out based on what you are shooting?


Never say never, but I doubt I would.  Far better for Canon to put an articulating touch screen on all cameras and then let folks articulate and/or touch if they want to or leave face out and not touch if they don't.

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