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Messages - gbchriste

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1
Technical Support / Re: 5D2 - Tethering
« on: December 18, 2014, 05:38:08 PM »
The EyeFi Mobi can only transfer jpgs, not raw files.  It's also pretty slow.  I have one in the SD slot of my 5D3, capturing smaller size jpgs to transfer images to my phone or ipad for a larger screen preview.  To save on camera battery power I also have the EyeFi card disabled on the camera while shooting, and then when I have a collection of images I want to see, I turn it on and initiate the transfer.  Takes a few minutes for even 20 or so images to transfer.

2
I don't know about video but I was able to recover images from a bad card using Data Rescue from Prosoft Engineering when no other recovery program I tried could.

http://www.prosofteng.com/products/data_rescue.php


3
Landscape / Re: Rural Landscapes
« on: November 29, 2014, 10:32:49 AM »
Hi gbchriste.
Lovely series, Wondering if you called to the horses, or were they just curious of you stopping to shoot?

Cheers, Graham.

I just completed a recent business trip that took me through South Georgia.  My schedule didn't allow me to plan for any dedicated photography time but I took my gear with me just the same.  Turned out I didn't to go out on any dedicated photographic outings but my route took me through some scenic farm country and literally stopped along the side of the highway and took a few shots here and there as my travels progressed.



Thanks!  Actually there was quite a bit of luck involved here.

When I first pulled up on the scene the horses were actually much closer to fence along the highway and happily grazing away with their heads facing toward the sun coming in from the left of camera - a lovely composition and great light.

I parked about 50 yards down the road and carefully and quietly made my way down the road, getting my camera set up as I went.  But as soon I got in to my intended shooting position and raised my camera they both immediately turned their tails to me and started walking off to a far corner of the pasture. 

I kept my lens trained on them the whole time as they walked off just praying that they would stop and turn.  When they got in to this far corner they stopped briefly and lifted their heads to look back at me and I got this one shot off. But before I could get another, they lowered their heads and continued walking away.  This was the only frame I was able to get.

Would have loved to had a shot with the white horse's head a little higher up so I could see her full face but the shot just never materialized.

4
Lenses / Re: I *HATE* UPS.
« on: November 29, 2014, 08:57:41 AM »
A couple of suggestions

1.  Whenever I order something high value like a camera body or lens, I set the delivery up to pick it up in person at the local UPS or FedEx facility, depending on how it is coming.  Yes, it requires a little more work on my part to drive there and stand in line, but that way I don't take any chances.

2.  Did it ever occur to you to hand write a notice on a piece of paper - "Please deliver packages inside" - and stick it on the front of your drop box?

3.  Unless the package was clearly marked "Fragile, Handle With Care" or some similar notice, how the hell is he supposed to know?  You're the one that put a parcel drop box with a 3-foot drop on to concrete/steel in front of your business for exactly this purpose, and now your pissed that the delivery service used it.

5
Landscape / Re: Rural Landscapes
« on: November 27, 2014, 08:46:09 PM »
I just completed a recent business trip that took me through South Georgia.  My schedule didn't allow me to plan for any dedicated photography time but I took my gear with me just the same.  Turned out I didn't to go out on any dedicated photographic outings but my route took me through some scenic farm country and literally stopped along the side of the highway and took a few shots here and there as my travels progressed.


Beautiful series.  I especially like the 3rd picture. Nicely done.

Many thanks!

6
Landscape / Re: Rural Landscapes
« on: November 27, 2014, 08:45:51 PM »
I just completed a recent business trip that took me through South Georgia.  My schedule didn't allow me to plan for any dedicated photography time but I took my gear with me just the same.  Turned out I didn't to go out on any dedicated photographic outings but my route took me through some scenic farm country and literally stopped along the side of the highway and took a few shots here and there as my travels progressed.













Nice pictures! Opportunistic photo moments are often the best. At least I find it so. I particularly like the first and third picture.  :)

Thank you kindly!

7
Landscape / Re: Rural Landscapes
« on: November 27, 2014, 12:43:37 PM »
I just completed a recent business trip that took me through South Georgia.  My schedule didn't allow me to plan for any dedicated photography time but I took my gear with me just the same.  Turned out I didn't to go out on any dedicated photographic outings but my route took me through some scenic farm country and literally stopped along the side of the highway and took a few shots here and there as my travels progressed.












8
Landscape / Re: Beautiful sunsets
« on: November 07, 2014, 03:08:25 PM »
My wife suffered a severely broken ankle a few months ago and I have been playing care giver pretty much 24/7.  Consequently the camera gear has stayed stored away for a while.  But she finally recovered enough that I could leave her home alone for an hour or two and these 2 sunset shots from 2 nights this past week represent my reentry in to the craft.






9
EOS Bodies / Re: Patent: Variable Diffusion Focusing Screen
« on: October 15, 2014, 04:42:35 PM »
And forgive my ignorance but why aren't modern DSLRs fitted with split prism focusing screens.  I shot with a Canon AE-1 and/or A-1 for 20 years and never, ever missed focus on anything.  I was 50/50 in focus with the 5DII and 70-200 2.8 Mk I.  Now with the 5DIII and 70-200 MkII I'm about 90% in focus but still...

10
You'd have to lay out some money but have you considered virtualization?   A virtualization environment is one that lets you run one operating system within its own application space hosted on another operating system.  Check out VMWare Workstation.  You can run VMWare Workstation on your desktop with a separate Windows 7 or 8 OS inside a virtual machine.  So you would in effect be running two machines simultaneously on the same physical box.  And you can share resources between those such as your network and Internet connection, shared drives, USB ports, etc etc.  So you could run DPP within your virtual Windows 8 OS, and still have full, simultaneous access to your Vista system.

I'm a Mac user and do all my photo processing on the Mac OS but I'm also a Windows IT analyst and software developer and have to have a couple of different Windows desktop and server environments to work on.  I don't keep separate hardware around for those.  I run VMWare's virtualization product for Mac - VMWare Fusion - and have a Windows environment running in its own window on my Mac system.  Works like a charm.

11
Lenses / Re: I'm terrified of my EF 70-200 f/2.8 IS II
« on: September 03, 2014, 08:35:26 PM »
Another +1 for the Black Rapid with this lens.  My usual outdoor portrait session goes to about 2 hours and I can easily tote it around for that length of period with no problem.  And with the strap attached to the tripod foot of the lens, the mount is not supporting the weight of the lens, but rather the weight of the body.  The weight of the lens is being borne by the strap.

12
EOS Bodies / Re: Is Canon now two generations behind Nikon?
« on: August 29, 2014, 10:20:27 AM »
The capabilities of any modern, advanced DSLR, whether Canon or Nikon, usually far outstrip the capabilities of the person using it.

13
Photography Technique / Re: APOLLO missions - image inconsistencies
« on: August 17, 2014, 08:41:23 PM »
Actually this conspiracy theory was debunked by Myth Busters.  They set up a scale model of the lunar landing site, the lunar module. The set construction included accurate representations of the contours of the surface and used materials with similar reflectivity as the lunar surface.  They then positioned the LEM and astronaut models at the correct position and orientation, and a point light source at the proper orientation and azimuth that the sun was at at the moment the photos were taken.  The shadows and light artifacts in the original images that are often sited by conspiracy adherents as "inconsistent" were in fact accurately duplicated in their scale model experiment.

http://mythbustersresults.com/nasa-moon-landing

14
Business of Photography/Videography / Re: Who owns the photo?
« on: August 11, 2014, 07:41:36 PM »
It would be entertaining to see how this plays out.

A big question is whether or not the photographer actually went to the trouble of getting a copyright on the photo in the first place. (Yes, lots of people put the copyright symbol on their photos but never bother to file the paperwork. Doing so preserves some rights, but it's not an absolute guarantee of copyright)

I suspect that in this case, had the photographer actually copyrighted the picture, then Wikipedia would be in quite a weak position because the copyright would serve as an official designation that the government has declared that the right to the photograph belongs to the photographer. If you have an official copyright from the Government, it's unlikely that a court is going to say that is invalid.

But, if the photographer simply placed a copyright on his files and never followed up with paperwork, well, then that's another question. If that's the case, then Wikipedia could well argue what they are arguing now -- which is that he never had the ability to secure the copyright. Under that situation, the photographer is likely to have to prove that he does indeed have the right to a copyright.

First situation, Wikipedia would have to prove he never had the right to the copyright -- burden of proof should be on them to show that the government erred in awarding the copyright.

Second situation, photographer must prove he has the right to copyright the photo -- burden of proof likely to be on him to prove that he should be awarded the copyright.

Now, the other question might be just what exactly does that copyright protect? If the photograph has been widely circulated without any copyright designation, the photographer might be in a weak position to now claim copyright.

Additionally, since the copyright protects the photographer's financial interest and is not an absolute bar to using the photo, court might have to determine what his financial loss is from the violation. He could win the copyright case and be awarded $1.

And, finally, copyright is not an absolute bar to reproducing a creative work. There are exceptions for educational, critical and artistic uses. Might not apply in this case, but it can apply in others.

This may never be litigated, but if it is, it will be interesting.

It's not correct the "filing a copyright" would seal the deal, at least under U.S. law.  In the U.S. copyright is established at the moment the artistic work is created.  From that point on, any actions the author takes to mark or register the copyright are simply means of documenting the copyright that already in fact exists.

If I take a photo and never watermark it or register it with the U.S. Copyright Office, and later discover an infringement, I can take all legal action to enforce my copyright.  The only issue remaining is how to I prove that I am in fact the author of the work.  Perhaps all that is necessary is for me to produce the original RAW, date-time stamped image file.  Of course, the task of proving my authorship becomes easier if I have in fact registered my copyright but it is not essential to establishing my copyright.

15
Software & Accessories / Re: Insurance is an accessory right? :P
« on: August 10, 2014, 06:42:13 PM »
I've been a USAA member since 1985.  At that time USAA membership was limited to commissioned officers.  In 1996 membership was opened to military personnel of all ranks.

Now before I start and get flamed all over the place, let me preface by saying I was an enlisted airman from 1977 until my commissioning as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1985.  I was in a demanding and difficult career field and that period of my service is something I'm particularly proud of.  So I have no class biases here.

Having said that, in my view, the quality of service offered by USAA has steadily declined since the membership changed.  I've had occasion to finance and refinance homes as well as file several auto claims during those years and while the service started out on a stellar level that could not be matched, my recent transactions (a home refinance and auto claim) have left me feeling like I was dealing with a run-of-the mill insurance company in which the agents and adjusters were just in it for the paycheck rather than really interested in helping me.  I won't go in to all the details of why.

Again, no class bias here, but simple actuarial science would dictate that when you take a risk pool that consists exclusively of older, degreed professionals (i.e. commissioned officers), and add to that an entirely new population that consists in large part of young kids, many who barely made it out of high school, with little to no prior work or professional experience (i.e. young enlisted troops), then the insurance risk profile of the entire pool is going to go up significantly.  And when that happens, costs go up as well.

It's just a theory but I believe USAA is now reaping the harvest for the decision they made in changing the membership criteria.  Costs go up, losses go up, and as a result, they can no longer be the premier service provider they once were.

This year I've actually started thinking about moving away from USAA to another insurance provider after 29 years of membership.  I don't mind paying more money when I receive superior service but it's becoming somewhat debatable as to whether USAA can provide that superior level of service to justify any higher rates I might be paying.

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