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Messages - acelegendary

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1
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Wedding video help
« on: June 25, 2014, 07:52:37 PM »
During the ceremony, definitely use the GoPro as a superwide safety shot. This will give you something to cut to during the edit when you're adjusting focus, changing angles or the record limit stops on your DSLR's. Depending on the venue, placing it in a balcony would be ideal, but it can also be placed on a mini tripod on the floor facing the altar/stage. Hero 3's have terrible battery life, so don't hit record on it too early (10 minutes early will suffice).

I would put the 6D + 17-40 on a tripod (or monopod if it's a version with balance feet and you're confident in being stable) in the front, facing down the aisle during the processional to capture the wedding party and bride entrance. Obviously don't block the aisle, and be mindful of the guests. As for focus, if you're not experienced I would NOT try to manually follow your subjects as they walk towards you. Instead, place the focus towards the middle of the aisle (or closer) and allow your subjects to walk into the shot. Once they're out of focus in the edit, cut to the GoPro or 70D, then cut back to the 6D for your next subject.

The 70D should be placed in the BACK of the venue on a tripod, equipped with your 24-105 (the crop sensor will turn that 105mm to 168mm). During the processional, this will be your groom shoot. Keep in mind it might all be ruined when the crowd stands up and blocks your shot, so you'll have to prepare for this. After the bride has been handed off, readjust the tripod to the center of the aisle (but not too close) for a nice, tight middle shot on the couple. As a professional, I never trust auto focus, but you may want to use it here if you're not confident with the LCD screen. Just make sure to keep an eye on it, and if it's constantly shifting, manually focus on the couple and leave it alone.

At this point your 6D will be shooting the crowd (aka: nothing important), so go up and readjust it to face the couple from the side. Pop on that 100mm (you could have it lying below the tripod) and get a tight shot of the bride or groom, whichever you are facing. If you had a third DSLR, it would mirror this one on the other side. Alternatively, you can just set this camera aside and only worry about your middle 70D shot, as you're probably not getting paid for this anyway, and the middle is the most important. However, if you're not going to mic the groom, then the 6D can be your slightly-less-crappy audio source. Even if you put an external mic on the camera, the audio is still going to be trash due to the terrible preamps, but I digress . . .

Or, you know, tell her to hire a freaking professional  ;)

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I think it looks great, maybe the motion looks strange but honestly most of the clients wont even notice or care, I have a question for you, wich piece of software did you use for color grading? 

very nice video BTW

I did all of my color grading within Premiere, actually.

3
I take it your pleased with the result based on your response, but I can tell you used a high shutter speed here and it seems to have affected the motion blur.  Whether or not the effect is positive is subjective, but I personally don't like it.  Doesn't look bad or anything just not great IMO, then again 60P is kind of the bare minimum for slowmo so you can only expect so much out of it.  I'm sure the client is elated and that's what matters in the end.


I thought the results were outstanding; I like the way each frame is crystal clear (to each his own, I suppose).  Now that I know the 'why', I plan on experimenting with high shutter speed video.

To the OP, thank you for posting that.

Thank you, and you're welcome! As I mentioned earlier, however, the footage does look super videogame-ish when not slowed down. So use this method with caution!

4
Nice work! What camera?

The moving shots were filmed on a T2i/50mm f/1.4, mounted on a Glidecam HD2000. The static shots were filmed on a 7D/Zeiss 50mm Makro-Planar f/2.

Great results with modest gear! You should be proud.

Thanks! I would've loved to use my 5D Mk II, but the lack of 60 fps killed my concept.

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Nice work! What camera?

The moving shots were filmed on a T2i/50mm f/1.4, mounted on a Glidecam HD2000. The static shots were filmed on a 7D/Zeiss 50mm Makro-Planar f/2.

6
Hey there,

Long time reader, first time poster.

I recently filmed an engagement session, and wanted to utilize a shallow depth of field in bright light without an ND filter. So, knowing that I would end up slowing the footage down to 40%, I cranked up the shutter speed in order to hit around f/2. The results? Well, see for yourself:

http://acelegendary.com/blog/2013/4/9/sean-liz-save-the-date


Holy hell, that looks FANTASTIC!  I usually obey the shutter speed rule as well, but, thanks to you, I am now unafraid to break it!

You make me want to marry someone just so I can hire you to make one of these!


Well thank you very much! Do keep in mind, however, that the footage is almost unusable when not slowed down. It almost looks like CGI due to the lack of motion blur. Very odd.

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Quite nice, and a very good job keeping the focus where you wanted it at f/2. What supports/focus puller/etc did you use?

I used a Glidecam HD2000, but tilted it upside down. For the most part, I just set the plane of focus to a few feet in front of me and tried to keep pace with them. No focus puller :)

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EOS Bodies - For Video / ND filters for video? Suggestions?
« on: April 15, 2013, 04:57:04 PM »
Hey all,

Does anyone have any experience using ND filters for DSLR video? If so, what are your brand preferences?

9
Yeah, it's pretty obvious that a high shutter speed was used, but getting that shallow DoF without an ND filter would've been impossible.

Under normal circumstances, however, I try not to break the 180 rule too much.

And yes, they loved it  ;)

10
Hey there,

Long time reader, first time poster.

I recently filmed an engagement session, and wanted to utilize a shallow depth of field in bright light without an ND filter. So, knowing that I would end up slowing the footage down to 40%, I cranked up the shutter speed in order to hit around f/2. The results? Well, see for yourself:

http://acelegendary.com/blog/2013/4/9/sean-liz-save-the-date

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