December 20, 2014, 07:43:12 PM

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Messages - miah

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1
EOS Bodies / Re: Ron Martinsen Blasts the 7DII in his review
« on: Today at 09:15:25 AM »
Hello everyone.

First of all, let me give you my congratulations to everyone, it´s my first post, but i follow this forum for quite a while, and i really like to read your opinions either i agree, or not. I´m sorry for any mistake in writing, i speak better english than i write.

My name is Peter i am a wildlife photographer in Portugal and i really feel the need to write in this post, because i own the new 7D markII for a couple of days and i tested it in a very harsh environment with fog and in almost no light.

And the camera went in a superb response! Auto focus is incredible even in very dificult conditions, and ISO gave me very good photos at iso 2000. I am not a pixel peeper, i don´t make comparisons, i don´t study at the minimun detail pixels or IQ, first of all i need to get the picture!! And in that field the 7D markII is superb.

I also own a 5D markIII so i was kind of expecting this behavior, but it really pleasured me.

I think some people are being very infair reviewing this camera. First of all, let´s not forget, it´s a 1600$ camera! Expensive? I think it has a quite reasonable price for what it delivers. But i think people is demanding things to this camera tha you can achieve in a 6000$ camera...Not real! And most part of the people who criticizes want everything in a 1600$ camera. They want an aps-c with 40MP, with iso capability of 25000, they want the camera to fly, they want the camera to be perfect...and that´s not possible...at least at this price.

And then, there ar very people who´s talking bad of this camera because they didn´t understand what is the target of this camera! If i want a Wedding camera i take my 5D markIII! If I want a low light camera, or a landscape camera I take a Canon 6D, or a 5D markIII. 7D markII it´s NOT a walkaround camera. His purpose is to get the photo in fast action! It is made for wildlife and sports!!

I heard some talks about softness in image in this camera. So let me say again...if you are putting side by side canon 1D X or canon 5d markIII sharpness although it´s unfair, yes it may be not so sharp. But if i put you 2 photos side by side in good light conditions, of 5d markIII ad 7D markII without 100% zooms without all those tests you´ll never figure what the machine took the photo!! And that´s real world photo!

What concern´s me a little bit is it seems Canon is loosing something for Nikon and Sony in Image quality overall...that´s a real concern.

So this post is not scientific, nor trying to prove anything, it´s just my opinion that people are being unfair reviewing this camera. Yes, it´s not perfect, but for wildlife or sports? It´s awesome and if you don´t get the shot it´s your fault!

BTW - If you use ISO 2000 and you make a 50% crop, Of course you´ll get noise, but that´s not camera fault!!

"If you're pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough" - Robert Capa


Thank you everyone and please continue, i really apreciate all off your posts!

Welcome to CR, Go Wild; your post hit the nail right on the head.

2
Software & Accessories / Re: i folded and bought CC :(
« on: December 18, 2014, 05:05:39 PM »
Thanks for the clarification on MathWorks' policy, wsheldon; that's really helpful to know.

So, given your stated needs, if Adobe were to come to you and ask how they could improve their policy to make you feel good about their subscription service--while still allowing them to make a reasonable profit from their labors--what would be your answer? There are obviously a number of ways to skin this cat, but I think the photo-hobbiest market has a legitimate beef with their current policy and if we can communicate that to Adobe they may be willing to listen.

Honestly, I think a hybrid approach would be ideal. Offer a CC subscription option with a higher start-up fee that gives you the right to keep using your latest version if you stop subscribing, but still offer the lower priced pay-as-you-go option with no start-up for the people that makes sense for. Basically an option for a perpetual license but within the existing CC infrastructure.

Offering hold-outs like me who are clinging to our full versions of CS6 and LR5 a discount for that perpetual license option would be even better (and smooth our ruffled feathers).

That sounds a whole lot like my exit-fee strategy, only mine would put the cost of a perpetual license on the tail-end instead of the front-end. This would lower the entry barrier and raise the exit barrier, something I think Adobe would be happier with.  ;)

So, if Adobe offered you a contract where the price of exit/perpetual license couldn't go up after you agree to subscribe, and your sole cost of entry is paying $9.99 to subscribe to the latest versions of both Ps and Lr with all the updates, technical support and behance thrown in, would you do it? Mind you, if they decided to jack the rate at some point, say to $14.99/month, you could always exercise your exit strategy, pay the agreed upon exit fee for your fixed-version, perpetual copy, and go on your way.

I'm just trying to get to the bottom of this argument, if that's possible. Like I said previously, I think the non-fulltime photographers have a legitimate concern; I'd just like to see if there's a formula that both those folks and Adobe can live with.

3
Software & Accessories / Re: i folded and bought CC :(
« on: December 18, 2014, 03:13:59 PM »
I just had another thought. Though the only thing I know about MathWorks' subscription model is what has been revealed in this thread, it just occurred to me that allowing someone to continue using software that they once subscribed to has major pitfalls for the publisher. For instance, it wouldn't take long for people to figure out that they could game the system by subscribing for a single month, paying their $9.99, then canceling. They could then go on using two versions (both Ps and Lr) that they had just rented until such time that they wanted to "upgrade." They'd then resubscribe, get the newer versions, then cancel again. This tactic would cost Adobe millions.

Technically Mathworks and similar companies don't offer a subscription model, but rather a software maintenance service (SMS) model. They sell you a perpetual license to use the software for a sizable fee (similar to buying a new copy of PS or LR) that includes 1 year of free software maintenance, then prompt you to pay a much reduced fee (e.g. 20%) each year after that to renew your SMS. So it's like buying a full update every 5th year, but giving you all the updates in between and giving them a steady revenue stream. Lots of technical software I use works this way.

As said up the thread, the big benefit for users is that they can keep current on all the releases as long as they want, but stop paying at any time and just keep using their last version as long as their hardware supports it. They can restart their SMS later, but they effectively have to pay a catch-up fee equivalent to the time they skipped (or just buy a new full license with 1 year SMS if that's cheaper). So there's no way for the publisher to get screwed by people churning their subscription as you postulated.

Also, I'm not saying there are not people who benefit from the Adobe subscription model. As others have said, if you're a media professional who always has to stay up to date on versions, or if you're just starting out and haven't already bought these professional-grade software packages, it's a huge bargain. No doubt about that. It's those of us in between who have already invested in these tools and want a way to upgrade only if and when we really need to and have the means to, but want to have perpetual access to our catalogs and editing tools REGARDLESS of what Adobe does in the future, that have a problem with the CC model.

Thanks for the clarification on MathWorks' policy, wsheldon; that's really helpful to know.

So, given your stated needs, if Adobe were to come to you and ask how they could improve their policy to make you feel good about their subscription service--while still allowing them to make a reasonable profit from their labors--what would be your answer? There are obviously a number of ways to skin this cat, but I think the photo-hobbiest market has a legitimate beef with their current policy and if we can communicate that to Adobe they may be willing to listen.

4
Software & Accessories / Re: i folded and bought CC :(
« on: December 18, 2014, 01:25:10 PM »
I just had another thought. Though the only thing I know about MathWorks' subscription model is what has been revealed in this thread, it just occurred to me that allowing someone to continue using software that they once subscribed to has major pitfalls for the publisher. For instance, it wouldn't take long for people to figure out that they could game the system by subscribing for a single month, paying their $9.99, then canceling. They could then go on using two versions (both Ps and Lr) that they had just rented until such time that they wanted to "upgrade." They'd then resubscribe, get the newer versions, then cancel again. This tactic would cost Adobe millions.

One possible way to allay the fears of subscription-resisters, who think that if they cannot or will not continue to pay Adobe a monthly fee they will lose their ability to access their edited files, or that a price increase above the current $9.99 is untenable, would be to set up some sort of fee-based exit strategy. For example, they could implement a $50 exit fee that would allow anyone who had already subscribed for a set amount of time, say one year (I'm just making up numbers), to keep using the version they're on--without additional updates--in perpetuity. This would disincentivize would-be subscription-ditchers by having them weigh the cost of 5-months-worth of rental fees along with no updates against staying the course. But, importantly, it would also give someone an out--when for financial or other reasons they just want to strike that monthly fee from their budget.

What do you all think of this strategy? It might be a viable win-win.

5
Software & Accessories / Re: i folded and bought CC :(
« on: December 18, 2014, 11:09:21 AM »
I wonder if anyone can answer a question about CC.

If in the future I decide to stop paying could I still use those files (let's say they are DNG for argument's sake) that are stored locally in an older version of LR? I don't really see that situation happening but was just curious as someone mentioned being stuck paying forever. The RAW files themselves stay on your hard drive, right? So you could do what you want with them. You just lose your edits and ability to edit. And if you start paying again you get them back, right?

So the issue is you can't play with your files without paying? That seems like a funny complaint since you have to pay anyway, even with perpetual license.

I pay for Netflix monthly. Stop paying - no movies. Seems unfair to say "Hey, Netflix gimme the movies I've watched already even though I'm not paying". Why should it be different for Adobe?

That said, you can still access some features such as the Slideshow, Web, Book or Print creations if you decide to quit according to the CC help pages. I wonder if you can export at all?

Your images reside on your hard drive in a folder that remains accessible, with or without Lightroom. Losing Lightroom means losing Lightroom's feature-set and edit libraries, but the original photos don't go anywhere. You'd be free to open them with any other viewing or editing software and do with them whatever you like.

I don't think your Netflix analogy is quite accurate, in this case. You're paying Netflix for a service: to watch a film you do not own. With Lightroom--provided you purchased the stand-alone product--you actually own a perpetual license to that version of the software for use in organizing and manipulating images that you also own (provided your hardware and OS still support the singular version of Lr that you purchased). Subscribing to Lightroom, however, is more like Netflix's service model, where you can use the software to do your work, but if you choose to end your subscription, the service is no longer available. Your original images remain, but their organizational structure and the work you already put into editing them would be inaccessible until you renew your subscription.

This is why some here have argued that it would be more reasonable for Adobe to adopt a subscription model more similar to MathWork's, where you're able to continue using the version of Lr you were last using when you canceled your subscription. I think this is a very reasonable request and I think it behooves all of us to lobby Adobe for just such a change. That said, I don't think I personally would cancel my subscription because I prefer to push Adobe to continue advancing Lightroom's features. Too, I won't always have the same computer or the same OS or the same camera or the same lenses, all of which will require updates from Adobe to fully utilize Lightroom.

6
Software & Accessories / Re: i folded and bought CC :(
« on: December 17, 2014, 02:08:59 PM »
I just wonder how soon will Adobe start to increase this rental, once they have their customer base hooked.  A tenner a month may not be objectionable to many customers, but what if when it goes up?

Miah, if you don't like reading discussions about Adobe, then there is not reason to be "sick and tired", simply choose not to read threads that discuss it.  You do not get to choose what can be discussed and what should be "put to rest".

Come on, Acutance, nobody's trying to play arbiter of what is and is not discussed, I just think that this "Damn Adobe!" sentiment is getting a little long in the tooth. Further, instead of just lurking, I tried to throw out why I feel their Photography Bundle for $10 a month is actually a better deal than buying and "owning" the software over the long haul. People are free to disagree with my analysis, but I'd love to hear on what grounds.

Regarding the possibility of a rate increase, Adobe has publicly stated that they have no plans to increase the rate within the foreseeable future. And if they do, we as customers, who vote with our greenbacks, hold the final say.

7
Software & Accessories / Re: i folded and bought CC :(
« on: December 17, 2014, 12:32:41 PM »
The OP shouldn't feel like a "turncoat" for signing up for Adobe's CC, he should feel like a rational person who sensibly concluded that it's worth it. Honestly, I am sick and tired of the whining that goes on about how the onerous Adobe is taking us all to the cleaners. Let's look at the facts:

1. Adobe owns the market, right now. There are competing products, even after Aperture's untimely demise, but there is nothing even close to the performance and flexibility of Photoshop and Lightroom. Nothing.

2. Adobe is a business just like any other. They aren't running it for fun, they're running it to create value for their shareholders, aka make a profit. At the point that they piss off their customers with poor products or truly onerous conditions, their customers will flee to the open arms of another entrepreneur who will be thrilled to accept them (this may take some time, but there are millions of people using this software, so the opportunity is huge).

3. The license you "own" in perpetuity is only as good for as long as the hardware you're running it on, and the operating system you're running it in, will last. Should you want to run it "forever without paying another dime," you better be prepared to keep the same computer running forever and never upgrade to an unsupported OS--security be damned. I mean, get real, CSx's feature-set will not only become dated, it will become useless as hardware and OS technologies inevitably advance. You can own it "forever," but will you be able to use it forever?

4. So much is made of the cost of subscription without examining the math. I use Ps and Lr almost everyday, but I was still able to get by upgrading the stand-alone products every other or even every third round. In addition to that, my wife's a teacher, so I got the very significant educator discount (applicable to immediate family members). I keep a running spreadsheet of my computer/photography purchases, so I looked back over the past decade and totaled up my expense of BUYING Ps and Lr, skipping 1 or 2 versions in between, and getting the huge educator discount. I then divided that number by the amount of time I had used it, up until that point. It came to $17/month. Per month! That means by switching to the subscription service even I was able to save $7 a month AND start using the latest and greatest features on whatever hardware I typically upgrade to every 3-5 years.

5. When Adobe first announced their subscription plans their prices were out of touch with reality. Then came the uproar. So, Adobe listened to the market and brought the price of their Photography Bundle down to a very reasonable $9.99/month. I've been in business all my life and know from experience that if enough of us clamor for even better terms, like those offered by MathWorks, Adobe will seriously consider it. Business isn't a democracy, but every business worth its salt knows that pleasing customers is in their long-term best interest.


Now, can we put this to rest? For some, who use this type of software only occasionally, 10 bucks a month is too much. For them there's DPP, Pixelmator, and the like. For others, who choose to try and keep the same hardware and OS in perpetuity, there are still old, boxed versions of CSx. But for anyone who has carefully examined the pros and cons of Adobe's subscription service, $9.99/month is a remarkably good deal.

8
Lenses / Re: Review: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
« on: December 14, 2014, 02:23:57 PM »
Thanks for,the advice on the 1.4x extender. Your right I've heard the 7d2 does really eat the battery up so the grip may be a good idea. If you want to talk to GraFax you might ask him on a different thread like anything posted with a 7d2, he said he's done with this one as there's been some disagreement with ff vs crop. I'm not familiar with the place your heading Thursday but enjoy and I hope the new camera helps you capture some great photos!

Thanks, Ryan85; I PM'ed Grafax, so hopefully he'll rejoin the stage...

9
Lenses / Re: Review: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
« on: December 14, 2014, 12:59:33 PM »
A 400 5.6 is about the longest lens I can comfortable carry and shoot hand held for a full day out. Even with the 7D2/4005.6L, my right shoulder is a bit sore.

Thanks for posting the great eagle shot, GraFax. I too use a 400 f/5.6 on my 5D3 and just yesterday received a new 7D2. Like you, I shoot a lot of wildlife and want a combo that I can carry around and handhold all day without getting too beat up. Question: I'm thinking about getting a grip for the 7D2. I've never owned or used a grip, but I like the concept. Do you think a grip would add more bulk/weight to the combo than it's worth?

Hi Miah, like you I just got my 7d2 this weekend and will be using my 400 5.6 with it. I have been using my 5d3 with the lens. As far as the battery grip goes IMO if you are going to shoot vertical/portriat orientation  a lot  the grip will help you use better form while handholding. It is going to,add weight so if you hand hold all day that might get to you.

Personally, I find it less tiring to handhold a gripped body all day if a large lens (the 400/5.6 certainly qualifies) is being used.  If your hands are medium-large, you can use your whole hand on the body, not just 3 fingers.

Thanks, Neuro. My hands are in the medium-large category and without gloves I can pretty comfortably hold on to the 5D3/7D2 body with all four fingers. But once I'm wearing gloves, forget it. I know you shoot with a 1Dx. Do you find the extra grip nice to have when you're wearing gloves out in winter conditions? If so, even just using the removable grip seasonally might be a worthwhile investment (especially since batteries drain faster in the cold, as well).

10
Lenses / Re: Review: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
« on: December 14, 2014, 12:51:41 PM »
A 400 5.6 is about the longest lens I can comfortable carry and shoot hand held for a full day out. Even with the 7D2/4005.6L, my right shoulder is a bit sore.

Thanks for posting the great eagle shot, GraFax. I too use a 400 f/5.6 on my 5D3 and just yesterday received a new 7D2. Like you, I shoot a lot of wildlife and want a combo that I can carry around and handhold all day without getting too beat up. Question: I'm thinking about getting a grip for the 7D2. I've never owned or used a grip, but I like the concept. Do you think a grip would add more bulk/weight to the combo than it's worth?

Hi Miah, like you I just got my 7d2 this weekend and will be using my 400 5.6 with it. I have been using my 5d3 with the lens. As far as the battery grip goes IMO if you are going to shoot vertical/portriat orientation  a lot  the grip will help you use better form while handholding. It is going to,add weight so if you hand hold all day that might get to you.

Thanks, Ryan85! In addition to less typical vertical shots, I've heard the 7D2 eats batteries, so I was thinking the grip would be nice to keep the party going all day long without having to swap batteries at a critical moment. Murphy's Law has caught me a number of times, swapping batteries right when the crucial moment comes and goes. That said, I hate carrying anymore weight/bulk than absolutely necessary, so I'm leaning towards going without. I'd like to hear from Grafax, since he's been shooting with his rig for a while, now. I'm headed to Bosque del Apache on Thursday, so I need to order (or not) that grip today.

Adding to GraFax's comment from earlier in the thread, I noticed he said he hasn't had much luck with a 1.4x TC on the 400 f/5.6. I'd have to agree that it's not the preferred set-up, but I've captured some of my best shots of BIF with the 1.4x TC attached to the 400 with my 5D3. In other words, that combo gives me fewer keepers, but when it hits--it hits!

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Lenses / Re: Review: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
« on: December 14, 2014, 11:09:22 AM »
A 400 5.6 is about the longest lens I can comfortable carry and shoot hand held for a full day out. Even with the 7D2/4005.6L, my right shoulder is a bit sore.

Thanks for posting the great eagle shot, GraFax. I too use a 400 f/5.6 on my 5D3 and just yesterday received a new 7D2. Like you, I shoot a lot of wildlife and want a combo that I can carry around and handhold all day without getting too beat up. Question: I'm thinking about getting a grip for the 7D2. I've never owned or used a grip, but I like the concept. Do you think a grip would add more bulk/weight to the combo than it's worth?

12
Lenses / Re: Introducing the Canon EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II
« on: December 02, 2014, 08:31:36 PM »
B&H now states that it's shipping even sooner -- on Dec 12.

13
Canon General / Re: What were you hoping to buy on Black Friday?
« on: November 29, 2014, 11:22:22 AM »
speaking of gift cards, what happened to amazon, b&h, and adorama offering 1% back on a future purchase?  I liked being able to get a couple of bucks back and applying it to an accessory or whatever.

Hey, you're right. I just checked B&H and the 2% Rewards business has been removed from a couple of the lenses I was considering. Two percent off on a Big White is a lot of money, so they've effectively instituted a stealth price increase.

14
Canon General / Re: What were you hoping to buy on Black Friday?
« on: November 29, 2014, 10:57:36 AM »
I was hoping we'd see a gift certificate for a 7D2 packaged with a 100-400L II, for say $200-300 off the list price, shipping by year's end. :P

15
Animal Kingdom / Re: First week of BIF action with 7D MK II
« on: November 09, 2014, 12:44:37 PM »
Thanks, Phil, I'll take a look at your site's March posts and give you a shout when I get close.

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