December 18, 2014, 08:43:59 PM

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Messages - Famateur

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1
EOS Bodies / Re: Sony Sensors Coming to Canon DSLRs? [CR1]
« on: December 16, 2014, 11:34:17 PM »
"You keep using that word inconceivable innovation. I do not think it means what you think it means." :P

If you mean low ISO dynamic range, huge megapixel counts or a radical new sensor design, okay. In my book, though, DPAF is clearly in the "innovation" category.

It's certainly an interesting approach, but in my mind, innovation is more than just doing something in a new way.  Innovation is defined by the "aha" moment where the advantages to the new approach are immediately so obvious that you can't imagine having done it the old way.

The thing is, Fuji showed the first compact camera with on-die phase detection AF back in 2010.  Canon has been playing catch-up ever since.  Yes, DPAF has an advantage over dedicated focus pixels in that you don't lose the light that would otherwise fall on half of certain pixels, though that difference will matter less and less as resolution increases—but DPAF still feels more like a way to work around Fuji's on-sensor phase detection patents while still achieving the same benefits, rather than true innovation.

If Canon wants folks like me to see them as still innovating in the area of sensors, they should:

  • Start with a backside illumination design.
  • Etch both sides of the sensor, with vias for every pixel.
  • Put per-pixel buffers on the reverse side of the sensor die, thus giving you a true global shutter.
  • Put a sizable heat sink on the reverse side of the sensor to dissipate the heat from the back-side buffers, thus reducing thermal noise.
  • Use one or more on-die ADC circuits for maximum accuracy and minimum noise.
  • Take advantage of the global shutter to eliminate dynamic range limitations and remove the need for setting ISO values entirely.
That last one is the jaw dropper.  The benefits of a global shutter for video are obvious.  The benefits for stills are even bigger, though, and I don't think anybody is really taking advantage of that yet, which seems bizarre to me.

The entire reason image sensors have limited dynamic range is twofold: because the ADC can provide only a certain number of bits of precision, and because when the full-well capacity of a pixel is exceeded, that pixel cannot hold any more photons.  However, if you can get the read noise levels low enough, you can just sample the pixels several times per exposure, and sum the results in a wider register.  You can then make clever use of Huffman coding or run-length encoding to minimize the impact of all those extra zeroes, and you'll be able to accurately reproduce everything from a single photon all the way up to the brightest light.

That would be innovation.  Real innovation changes things in ways that are jaw-dropping and earth-shattering.  Using DPAF to do automatic AFMA might do that, and using DPAF to correct the slightly-off phase detect focusing results after the mirror goes up might do that, but DPAF by itself doesn't do that, IMO.  DPAF is clever, but it is far from pushing the limits of technology.

Just my $0.02.

Well reasoned and compelling argument. By that definition, I'd have to agree.

2
EOS Bodies / Re: Sony Sensors Coming to Canon DSLRs? [CR1]
« on: December 16, 2014, 10:59:15 AM »
LOL...I wrote these replies yesterday afternoon but forgot to submit. Oops! Oh well...

------------------------------------

If this were true, I think it's a good thing for us. Canon sensors have been lacking in innovation for a while while Sony sensors have made huge advancements in what's possible. I like it.

"You keep using that word inconceivable innovation. I do not think it means what you think it means." :P

If you mean low ISO dynamic range, huge megapixel counts or a radical new sensor design, okay. In my book, though, DPAF is clearly in the "innovation" category.

yes.... wait until the tech has matured to the point where the average user can't tell the difference... put lots of research into things like DPAF and bring it to market.... move your sensors to a more modern fabrication line... and throw it all away to let the competition control your destiny...... not bloody likely!

I tend to agree.

I personally hope Canon keeps its high-end sensor production in-house. If the rumor somehow is true, and Canon uses some Sony sensors in DSLRs, I highly doubt Canon would cease development of its own DSLR sensor technology. Sony is not exactly the most solvent company out there. I suspect that Canon would only use a Sony sensor A) As an interim measure while refining development/production of a Canon-made equivalent/superior sensor, or B) Because Canon is fully prepared to acquire Sony's sensor division.

On the bright side, maybe Canon could solve the greenish color cast of the Nikon/Sony sensors. :P

3
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 15, 2014, 10:55:07 AM »
As usual, if cost alone was the deciding factor an external supplier will be often cheaper because of volumes. DIY has the added pleasure of learning, making mistakes and learning from them, and trying to achieve the exact final result you have in mind. IMHO this is priceless, and I will happily save some money elsewhere - anyway anybody as his/her own priorities - and quality standards.
Well said!

4
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 14, 2014, 12:58:54 AM »
In a nutshell, the solution for me was to have Lightroom manage the color and use the Canon profile while telling the printer driver not to do any color correction.

In Lightroom, to achieve very good printing results, you should use "print proofing" in the Develop module. From there, Lightroom can create a "snapshot" using the selected ICC profile. Once the snapshot is created, you can fine tune it (remember to enable "simulate ink and paper" to get a better preview of the final outcome). Youy can use the before/after view to match the soft proofed image with the original one. Then you can switch to the
print module and print.

This process is far more advanced (and controlled) than the simpler "Print adjustment" sliders in the Print module.

Great tip on soft-proofing and simulating ink and paper.

The gist of my comment was that I get good results having Lightroom manage the color and the printer driver itself keeping its color management hands off. I've heard others with similar experiences this way and also vice versa (printer controls the color correction and Lightroom leaves it alone). It would seem that when the printer driver and Lightroom are both trying to do stuff, it can mess with the final results.

By the by, I've got a pair of 13x19 prints drying at the moment, and I'm doing a happy dance at the results. :P

One last thought: It's not the cost of ink and paper that's the problem -- it's mats and frames! Good gravy!! After looking around at shops and online, I've pretty much decided to become my own small time framing shop.  ;D Forget another lens -- I'm going to get a mat cutter, miter trimmer and clamping system (now the woodworker in me is doing the happy dance!).

5
Software & Accessories / Re: HDR vs ML Dual ISO
« on: December 13, 2014, 03:40:08 PM »
In this case I would manually blend 2 (or more) exposures for canyon and sky. It would be easy blending because of "hard" transition from rocks to sky. And you would eliminate the ghosting effect in the clouds too.

+1

6
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 13, 2014, 03:21:32 PM »
Printing at home can quickly become a slippery slope.
Agreed!

7
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 13, 2014, 03:20:09 PM »
Just picked up one pack of Canon Pro Platium PT-101 4x6" (50sheets) at local Fry's. I was looking for 5x7" Canon Pro Platium matte, but don't seem to carry.

Anyone know where I can get a pack of 5x7" Canon Pro Platium matte?
I don't think they make it in matte (see here).  It seems us matte-lovers are in the minority these days, but the Platinum glossy papers produce such excellent results, making me forgive the matte finish.  I'm still looking for a matte I like at home, but I'd recommend Red River at the reasonable end and Moab and HahnemĂĽhle at the high end.

Thanks mackguyver .

Love the look of matte. Is there other paper companies offer same quality as Canon?
I just picked up a twin pack of Canon 13x19 Fine Art "Museum Etching" (40 sheets) on Amazon for $40 and free shipping. At the bottom of the box, it says, "Supplied by Hahnemuhle". If Hahnemuhle is producing Canon's Fine Art paper, that would seem like a pretty good indicator that other papers from that brand will produce good results with Canon's Hahnemuhle ICC profiles. I've also heard nothing but good things about Red River Paper. Their sampler is on its way to me right now, so I'll get a chance to try each of their papers, including their matte canvas. Looking forward to that!

8
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 11, 2014, 02:31:26 AM »
That's easy because I work at a pro photo lab! I realize this answer will be biased because I have a vested interest in continuing my livelihood, but printing photos at home is a complete waste of money IMO. The cost of inks (especially pigment inks) and photo grade papers makes it more expensive to print at home than at a lab. Plus all modern labs (including relatively small ones like mine) have online ordering available.

Bias noted.  :P

Seriously, though...what kinds of prices does your lab charge for an 8x10? My estimated cost (paper and ink) is about $0.89 per 8.5x11 print on Photo Paper Pro Luster (not Canon's bestest paper, but pretty darn good). If I use Fine Art Museum Etching with the buy one, get four free sale right now, it bumps to an estimated total of $1.01 per 8.5x11 print.

Are there labs out there that can compete with this? All the labs local to me are much higher (over $2/print), and even Costco and AdoramaPix are around $1.49 before tax.

Maybe I'm doing something wrong?  :P

9
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 11, 2014, 02:19:31 AM »
I got a Canon Pixma Pro 9000 II for free w/ a rebate when I bought my 6D.  I was really excited about it.

However, it has always had a red color cast.  I have tried everything from creating my own profiles with a colormunki photo to having profiles made, testing out printer vendor profiles, various software, monitor calibration, photo papers, etc.  Countless hours of research and frustrations galore.  I know more about color management than now than I ever intended.  Still, can't get rid of the color cast.  If you can't match what is on the screen with some level of accuracy it kind of kills the joy of it.

It is also an ink hog.  I don't print much at all (see above) but when I do print it always seems one or more of the cartridges is running out.

I've turned to printing at labs.

I would still love to get all this sorted out and have the ability to do great prints on my own, but I'm not willing to pour the money into it and get a higher end printer, invest the time, etc.  It's not worth it to me.

For the quick and dirty stuff I just use my cheep epson all-in-one and it does just fine.
Bummer about the color cast. I noticed a similar thing with my first prints, too -- reddish cast and printing a little too dark. What solved it for me was doing the following:

1. Calibrate the monitor (which you've done, it sounds like).

2. In the Lightroom print module, use the Canon ICC profile for the exact paper you're using (I use the Pro Luster paper, and the profile I use is called Canon Pro-100 <LU> 1/2 Photo Paper Pro Luster).

3. In the printer driver, set color correction to None (in my driver, I go to the |Main| tab, click [Set...] under Color/Intensity, then under Color Correction on the |Matching| tab, choose None).

It was number three above that finally did the trick in removing the reddish cast from my first couple of prints. To correct the brightness, I go to the Print Adjustment settings of the Lightroom Print Module and set brightness to 6, and that gives me great results.

In a nutshell, the solution for me was to have Lightroom manage the color and use the Canon profile while telling the printer driver not to do any color correction. I don't have a Pro 9000 II, so I'm not sure if this helps, but I hope it does!  :P

10
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 10, 2014, 06:25:01 PM »
Famateur, I've been cutting my own mats for a while now and it is very satisfying work, so enjoy that as well :) Careful never to buy an old Epson 3880 to convert to a dedicated piezograhy printer

Oh, and G.A.S. really takes on another dimension when it comes to printers, sure you can spend a lot on lenses, but things really start to sound serious when you unbox your first iPF8400, as I did yesterday  ;D  ;D ;D
I know what you mean! I was just looking at Adorama's deal on the iPF6400 today ($1,799 and free shipping after $300 rebate) and started scheming how I might be able to justify it. How many canvas prints in custom frames would I need to sell to pay for it. The answer is, not that many! Must...resist...

Congrats on the iPF8400! That's a serious piece of printing gear you've "acquired"!  :D

11
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 10, 2014, 11:50:39 AM »
Now to find some Canon ink deals...  :P

Aren't the paper deals a way to sell more ink?   :D

Most definitely, and so was the ridiculous discount and rebate that gave me the printer for free.  :P

That being said, it still seems like a pretty good deal when I crunch the numbers:

Deals like this bring the cost per sheet down to $0.14 for 8.5x11 Luster paper. If Red River's "Cost of Printing" report for the Pro-100 is representative of what I might expect, then using their equation and Amazon prices for Canon ink, it works out to:

Equation: (Cartridge per Square Inch)  x (Square Inches) x (Cost of one ink cartridge) = Ink Cost Per Print

.000643 x (8.5x11) x ($99.99/8) = $0.75

Add the cost per sheet for the Canon paper, and we get a grand total of $0.89 per 8.5x11 print.

Source: http://www.redrivercatalog.com/cost-of-inkjet-printing-canon-pro-100.html

Even if I only get half that printing capacity from my cartridges, I'm way ahead of local lab prices and not much more than Costco or AdoramaPix.

Intangibles worth paying for (to me):

> Having it "ship" from my desk to my hand -- right now.
> Being able to take photos of friends/family when visiting and give them prints before they leave.
> Being able to print small samples, then tweak processing to get the best large prints.
> No worries about damage in the mail.
> No gas, time, traffic, tax to deal with for local labs.

Just for fun:

For a 13x19 print on Red River canvas, the total estimated cost comes out to:

[.000643 x (13x19) x ($99.99/8)] + [$60.99/20] = $5.02  8)

Even through Costco, a 12x18 unframed canvas print is $31 after tax.  :o

12
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 09, 2014, 11:02:58 PM »
Well, I'm set for paper for awhile --  500 sheets of 8.5x11 Pro Luster for $75, after tax.  8)

Now to find some Canon ink deals...  :P

13
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 09, 2014, 10:50:09 PM »
Here's a link to their "Pro" papers page, and it looks like the Fine Art "Museum Etching" paper and the Premium Matte 13x19 paper are also included in the "Buy one, get four free" offer. Oh, and shipping is free, too!

http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/professional-paper?intv_id=137003&catalogId=10051&cm_cr=No+Campaign-_-Web+Activity-_-Top+Category_Secondary+-+Slot+6_1-_-Widget_CanonCategoryRecommendationWidget_5305-_-Professional+Paper-productNameLink&mpe_id=202267&evtype=CpgnClick&storeId=10051&ddkey=http:ClickInfo

14
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 09, 2014, 10:45:38 PM »
LOL!!!! Canon just so happens to be doing the "Buy one, get four free" deal right now!

I'm off to buy a shload of paper...  8)

http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ink-paper-toner/paper/semi-glossy-paper/photo-paper-pro-luster-letter-size-50-sheets

15
Technical Support / Re: What kind of photo printer do you use?
« on: December 09, 2014, 10:38:33 PM »
Count me as one who caught the printing bug! There's just nothing quite like holding the photograph in your hand or putting it in a frame on the wall, or giving it to a friend or family member. I love all things digital photography, but prints make it real for me.

Being a hobbyist on a tight budget, I can't afford some of the machines mentioned here, but I managed to find such great deals on what I have that I couldn't say no.

Paper: Canon had a sale on all photo paper a year or so ago. It was a "buy one, get four free" deal, so I picked up 250 sheets of 8.5x11 Pro Luster for $35.

Printer: Adorama and Canon offered a rebate deal for the PIXMA Pro-100 earlier this year. The printer, plus a 50-pack of 13x19 semi-gloss for $34, after $300 rebate. The rebate arrived in a couple of weeks. I think these deals come around a couple of times a year, so keep your eyes open.

This means I have the PIXMA Pro-100 and 300 sheets of paper for about $70. Yes, replacement ink will cost $100 on Amazon when these tanks run out, but for how much I've printed so far and how much fun it is, it's totally worth it. The next time Canon has a deal on paper like that, I'll be buy a LOT more. :P

One thing to keep in mind, though, is that for best results, you have to deal with color management. For me, that includes:

1. Dell IPS Monitor calibrated using xRite i1 Display Pro.
2. Printer driver set to "None" for color profile.
3. Lightroom set to use the Canon profile for the specific paper I'm using.

My desk is now piled high with beautiful prints, and I'm trying to figure out how I'm going to display them all. This is leading me to looking into getting my own mat cutter and framing equipment (being a woodworker, the framing part is particularly fun). Of course, once I frame everything, I'm going to run out of walls, and then I'll need to build more walls, and... Careful! Getting into printing could lead to adding onto your home!  :o

To borrow from an old Lays Potato Chips slogan, "You can't eat print just one." :P

Oh, for the photo book, I'd use a service. :)

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