July 25, 2014, 10:07:03 AM

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Messages - MichaelHodges

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1
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: DXO uh-oh?
« on: July 24, 2014, 05:01:17 PM »
Congrats to Nikon for another world class sensor.


2
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 23, 2014, 09:28:42 AM »

You know what else keeps deer populations in check? Wolves and mountain lions. Those same hunting groups lobby to kill large predators for trophies. Wolves are almost extinct in the US now, outside of Yellowstone, Glacier and a couple other small, protected pockets due to hunting.


Thumbs up on this post.

3
Software & Accessories / Re: Noise reduction in Lightroom
« on: July 20, 2014, 03:01:55 PM »
Hi,

I have a question to Adobe Lightroom 5.5 regarding the noise reduction (EOS M).

Are there any settings where I can get the same noise reduction like the Canon standard-in-camera-noise-reduction resp. the standard noise reduction in Canon DPP?
If yes, which settings are there?


I would advise letting go of DPP, and ceasing to use it for anything other than making sure your photos arrived during a transfer, or for basic exports.

Lightroom is much deeper and can create stunning results.

Under the "detail" tab on the right in Develop mode, you'll find the luminance and color noise removal sliders. This all depends on what camera you are using. For a full frame, you're not going to be using the sliders much unless shooting at very high ISO. For crops (70D, 7D) at ISO 800, I like to have a luminance of 10 and a detail of 70. Typically I will leave the color noise where it is. But at ISO 1600 I'll tweak it to 10 with a detail of 70. The 7D would require bumping luminance into 25, and color into the teens.

Even better is the localized noise tool, which is great for smoothing out noise-riddled backgrounds. You can really smooth out the bokeh while keeping  feather detail.

Personally, I would recommend sharpening before noise removal, or you're going to be sharpening details you just softened. True, you'll be sharpening noise too, but the spot removal takes care of that.


4
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 20, 2014, 02:02:49 AM »

LOL, sorry, but I find that completely illogical. It's also an unqualified statement...so I have to ask. WHY, in very specific terms, would you choose the 50D or 40D over the 7D for bears (or anything, for that matter)?



First,  I'm not sure if you just had chocolate or a Red Bull, but chill a little bit.

I've owned all of these cameras, and filmed ursine and ungulates in crepuscular conditions.  Photographing a brown bear running on a brown hillside is much different than filming a sporting event with brightly colored subjects.

In these low light, low contrast conditions, I found the 40D and 50D to simply have superior auto focus consistency with L telephoto lenses. On top of the auto focus, the 40D and 50D also seemed to have less substantial AA filters, which required less processing. The 7D RAW files also feel significantly more "rough", and require more processing all around than even my 40D. The 7D's colors appear drab compared to my 40D and 70D.

My keeper rate plunged significantly with the 7D's I used.  Blue channel noise is disturbing on the 7D, even at low ISO's. AI Servo, when combined with high speed burst mode seems to be especially problematic, getting focus, then not, then getting it again.

These numerous issues combined to make unpleasant RAW files. Sure, the 7D has a beautiful build and is a joy to hold and operate. And some of the features are nice. But who cares if the files are weak?

When I compare the 7D files to my 50D, 40D, 70D, 6D, and 5DIII, I simply shake my head. They're  a mess.

When you're out shooting the Bob Marshall Wilderness for a month, and you have these cameras side by side over thousands of images, its easy to see what camera can hack the conditions and what does not.  Once in a while, when conditions were perfect and everything went right, the 7D really came to life.  But that can be said for any cheap smart phone, too. The real test of a camera is how it does when conditions are crap.


 

5
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 19, 2014, 08:27:02 PM »
I wouldn't recommend a 7D at all for bears. In fact, I'd choose a 50D and a 40D over it for our ursine friends.

Would you recommend a 7D for anything?  Perhaps a paperweight or doorstop?   It's truly unfortunate that you seem to have gotten a lemon, but properly functioning 7Ds (which are the vast majority of them) are very good cameras.

 
Sure, I'd recommend the 7D for situations where you control the lighting (fashion shoots, etc). Or for shooting brightly-colored sports jerseys or race cars.

I used several 7D's over the years, and found them all to have focus consistency issues on grizzly bears and ungulates with L telephoto lenses.  On top of this, these animals come closer during crepuscular hours, and the 7D just falls flat here with noisy, rough RAW files. 

6
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 19, 2014, 07:42:55 PM »

The point being, don't fixate on gear. Technique beats gear every time. One of the best techniques to learn in bird photography is to be slow and quiet..... although that said, I would not refuse a 1DX and a 600II if it were offered :)

Location > gear

Time spent at location > gear

I'd rather shoot with a Canon S2 in Yellowstone for a year than a high end camera and lens combo for two weeks.

I bet if I had a 1D X and a 600/4 II I'd create 100x more great photography in two weeks than you would with your Canon S2 in a year. ;) I have absolutely zero doubt, as a matter of fact.

The odds of getting truly great photographs in nature increase exponentially based on time in the field, not what gear you have.

First, you have to get out there. Second, you have to stay out there in all conditions. Then you need to apply technique, and hopefully a bit of luck will come your way, but don't count on it.

Time can be a factor, but gear is not immaterial. If I wanted to get a shot of bears, I'd much rather have a 1DX/5D III and a 600/4 + 2x TC, or a 7D and 600/4, than anything else.

I wouldn't recommend a 7D at all for bears. In fact, I'd choose a 50D and a 40D over it for our ursine friends.

7
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 18, 2014, 09:37:19 PM »

agreed! I'd take a year in Yellowstone with an iPhone over the high end combo for two weeks...

Absolutely.  8)

8
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 18, 2014, 09:34:24 PM »

The point being, don't fixate on gear. Technique beats gear every time. One of the best techniques to learn in bird photography is to be slow and quiet..... although that said, I would not refuse a 1DX and a 600II if it were offered :)

Location > gear

Time spent at location > gear

I'd rather shoot with a Canon S2 in Yellowstone for a year than a high end camera and lens combo for two weeks.

I bet if I had a 1D X and a 600/4 II I'd create 100x more great photography in two weeks than you would with your Canon S2 in a year. ;) I have absolutely zero doubt, as a matter of fact.

The odds of getting truly great photographs in nature increase exponentially based on time in the field, not what gear you have.

First, you have to get out there. Second, you have to stay out there in all conditions. Then you need to apply technique, and hopefully a bit of luck will come your way, but don't count on it.


9
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 18, 2014, 08:53:39 PM »

The point being, don't fixate on gear. Technique beats gear every time. One of the best techniques to learn in bird photography is to be slow and quiet..... although that said, I would not refuse a 1DX and a 600II if it were offered :)

Location > gear

Time spent at location > gear

I'd rather shoot with a Canon S2 in Yellowstone for a year than a high end camera and lens combo for two weeks.

10
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 18, 2014, 08:37:54 PM »
IMHO the 7D shouldn't be mentioned with any of these cameras.


11
Hi experts,

I live in India and have a Canon 7D which I bought in Grey. Recently I have noticed that my camera does not product sharp images (out of focus) even with a 70-200 2.8 ii with IS on. To add to that images have lot of grain even at ISO 100. I know that 7D have the issue with Autofocus and high noise. Can Canon fix these issues? if yes then how much will they charge. Or is it better to get a better camera like 5D mark 3 or 70D?

Thanks,
Naveen

Can you post samples?

My 7D didn't work well with L telephotos.  All of my lenses function perfectly on other camera bodies.

12
I've never tried a 6D but a few weeks ago I saw some photos posted in the sports section and said if anyone questioned the 6D's capabilities I'd refer to them to that thread...


Nice shots. However, I don't feel sports shots are a good metric for determining focus quality. Even the cheapest cell phone cameras focus well on brightly colored clothing.

Now, start talking to me about brown grizzly bears feeding on a brown slope on a drab rainy day, and then you've got my attention.

13

Have you tried it on kids?  It couldn't keep up with mine... 



I have no problem with any critter moving towards me or away. I use center point AI servo. 


Quote
Like the 5DII before it, it does a decent job at tracking subjects moving across the frame, like the bighorns in your excellent image.  Where the 5DII and 6D fail are when a subject is moving toward or away from the camera (away is worse).   I just processed a burst sequence taken with my 1D X and 70-200/2.8L IS II of a gymnast running straight at me and vaulting from springboard onto the pad (which I was standing behind).  All 26 shots in the burst are in crisp focus (lighting was pretty poor, shots were at 1/800 s, f/3.2, ISO 12800).  The 7D would have gotten many of the shots in focus (but they'd have been unusable due to the ISO noise or the motion blur with a slower shutter speed. The noise from the 6D would have been acceptable, but after the first couple of frames, most of the shots would have been backfocused (and I'd have had far fewer shots, of course).



The 7D was the worst Canon DSLR I have owned. It was widely regarded as a "wildlife" lens, yet most big  wildlife is crepuscular in nature, a time when the 7D falls flat. I used my 7D and the 6D in that bighorn series, and the 7D failed. Many, many out of focus shots riddled with noise. Something about even light just played haywire with the copy I had when combined with telephotos.

I'm not surprised at the 1DX results. Awesome camera. 

While not the best photos, here are a couple examples of my 6D with a 300 prime and quick animals (much quicker than children). Very low sunset light, too. I've also attached the corresponding 100% crops.














14
I find the 6D to have better focus than any crop camera (and I've owned them all). If the 6D can nail bighorn rams unpredictably smashing heads, it can keep up with your kids and track race cars.




That was taken at 5 degrees, dawn. My 7D was completely useless in this scenario.

15
EOS Bodies / Re: Which is better for high ISO, 6D or 5D Mk III?
« on: July 09, 2014, 07:29:03 PM »
The difference between the 6D and 5DIII in long exposure high ISO is enormous.

http://petapixel.com/2012/12/13/canon-6d-and-5dmk3-noise-comparison-for-high-iso-long-exposures/

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