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Messages - Artifex

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1
Photography Technique / Re: Manual Focusing
« on: September 06, 2014, 10:15:50 AM »
Manual focus is more difficult than automatic focus, but it is, in my opinion, possible in every situation. A good focusing screen really helps, especially for a fast telephoto like a 85mm f/1.4. If you want to be effective with manual focussing however, there is no secret, you just have to practice, practice, and practice some more! I have been shooting manually for years now and I find it faster and more precise than autofocusing, but it did took lots of missed shots beforehand.

2
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Fun Arias rant on APS-C vs. FF
« on: July 30, 2014, 08:55:47 PM »
My brain hurt.

3
Lenses / Re: Review: Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens
« on: April 28, 2014, 10:07:38 PM »
Manual focus lenses where used for many years on SLRs.  The only thing different about focusing a manual focus lens on a DSLR is the focusing screen.  But Canon offers the old-style focusing screens for certain camera bodies; these show the actual depth of field even at f/1.4.  That's all that's need to make the Otus work well on a DSLR.

The resolution of current digital sensors exceeds that of film, particularly when you consider the 'typical' print sized enlarged from 35mm negatives vs. print sizes easily possible with a ≥18 MP digital file.  That means slight focus errors that were tolerable with film are often unacceptable with digital.

Also, Canon doesn't really offer 'old-style' focus screens, they offer 'not-so-old-style'.  Currently, you can get a screen with without the same degree of laser microetching for brightness - those are the 'super precision matte' screens that show you the true DoF of fast lenses…or you can get screens with manual focus aids (split prism or microprism) but they're based on the stock screens that don't show the true DoF of fast lenses.  When shooting film, there were focus screens that both showed the true DoF of fast lenses and had the split prism/microprism collar focusing aids.

Though you are right, it is still possible to get those old focus screens on DSLR through specialize web site. I use a Canon EC-B focus screen (split-screen focus aid and precision matte) on my 6D and it works quite well. The biggest problem, for me, is that the viewfinder is still much smaller on DSLR than on good old bodies, such as the Pentax K-1000. Manual focus lens are still a joy to use with the proper screen and some practice, although it is not for everybody.

Where do you get that focus screen for a 6D ?

http://www.focusingscreen.com

4
Lenses / Re: Review: Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens
« on: April 28, 2014, 04:45:08 PM »
Manual focus lenses where used for many years on SLRs.  The only thing different about focusing a manual focus lens on a DSLR is the focusing screen.  But Canon offers the old-style focusing screens for certain camera bodies; these show the actual depth of field even at f/1.4.  That's all that's need to make the Otus work well on a DSLR.

The resolution of current digital sensors exceeds that of film, particularly when you consider the 'typical' print sized enlarged from 35mm negatives vs. print sizes easily possible with a ≥18 MP digital file.  That means slight focus errors that were tolerable with film are often unacceptable with digital.

Also, Canon doesn't really offer 'old-style' focus screens, they offer 'not-so-old-style'.  Currently, you can get a screen with without the same degree of laser microetching for brightness - those are the 'super precision matte' screens that show you the true DoF of fast lenses…or you can get screens with manual focus aids (split prism or microprism) but they're based on the stock screens that don't show the true DoF of fast lenses.  When shooting film, there were focus screens that both showed the true DoF of fast lenses and had the split prism/microprism collar focusing aids.

Though you are right, it is still possible to get those old focus screens on DSLR through specialize web site. I use a Canon EC-B focus screen (split-screen focus aid and precision matte) on my 6D and it works quite well. The biggest problem, for me, is that the viewfinder is still much smaller on DSLR than on good old bodies, such as the Pentax K-1000. Manual focus lens are still a joy to use with the proper screen and some practice, although it is not for everybody.

5
Canon General / Re: $10,000
« on: April 26, 2014, 01:59:56 PM »
Canon 6D: 1900$
Samyang 14mm 2.8: 400$
Zeiss 21mm 2.8: 1900$
Sigma 35mm 1.4: 900$
Sigma 50mm 1.4: 1000$
Helios 44-2 58mm 2: 50$
Canon 100mm 2.8L: 1050$
Zeiss 135mm 2: 2100$

Custom Split-Screen Focussing Screen: 100$
Bag, tripod, batterie, sd cards, filters: 600$

6
Lenses / Re: Review: Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens
« on: April 22, 2014, 02:02:30 PM »
"Interesting is that, according to the owner's manual, "You can [snip] adjust the amount of focus ring rotation to operate Full-time MF function." via the dock.".
I'm not sure I understand well this sentence (english is not my native language). Does this means that it would be possible to have, for instance, a 270° focus throw instead of 90° in manual focus? Help would be appreciated, thanks!  :)

7
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Samyang Teases Some New Lenses
« on: April 19, 2014, 12:02:59 PM »
Considering the shape of the lens hood and lens itself on the picture, my guess would be a Cine 8mm T/3.1. For me, it is kind of disappointing; I think a FF fisheye, standard or macro could be more interesting than another APS-C fisheye.

8
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art Gets Reviewed
« on: April 12, 2014, 02:04:08 PM »
.........................
I must admit that, having looked at the available images I could find, including the http://lcap.tistory.com image examples, I believe the Sigma is a top notch lens. Sharpness, CA, distortion and bokeh looks very good. Color is still an open issue to me, since I do not know what kind of post processing they have been through, but it does not look bad.

Like you, I still doubt it will match the Otus, but it will have the advantage of AF. So I just made the decision and preordered the Sigma, but I will definitely keep my Otus.


Looking at the images and comparison at http://lcap.tistory.com there is no doubt that the Sigma outperforms the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4. Is there such a detailed comparison somewhere between the Sigma and the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2? or the Zeis Otus 55mm f/1.4?

I am wondering how it compare against Zeiss 50mm f/2 Macro, considering the pretty similar price (1280$) and the fact that it was until recently the best 50mm in term of optics.

9
Lenses / Re: New 50mm Sigma ? There are other options !
« on: April 12, 2014, 09:37:10 AM »
Up to 1/40 you don’t really need IS with a 35mm lens on full frame for stills.

The rest of what you have said is perfectly reasonable, but the above statement is at best outdated and at worst inaccurate. You might be able to hand hold some shots at 1/40 with a 35mm focal length, but generally you won't make full use of your 20mp or whatever.

Shake is quite random, but with the resolution of modern digital FF you really need to be in the region of 2x focal length. Even then you can get random shake. For really critical use nothing beats a genuinely stable mounting platform, but IS is a competent substitute up to a point. Personally I find IS very useful for stills when travelling without a tripod. It allows lower ISOs, greater dof, lower shutter speeds etc when hand held.

I have to say I disagree. With a bit of practice, you can easily have no shake at 1/30 up to 1/20 with a 35mm. At least, that's my situation.

10
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art Gets Reviewed
« on: April 06, 2014, 04:14:32 PM »
P.S. I hope Samyang will join the fast 50 competition soon.

Partly agree ... that Samyang makes a 50mm prime.

However, I hope they produce a relatively slow f2.8 lens without the trade-offs required for f1.4 to f1.8.

I am very, very happy with my Samyang 14mm f2.8, even though it is fully manual. I have little interest in their faster 35mm and 85mm lenses with f1.4.

My "vote" would be for Samyang to have a full line-up of very affordable, very sharp, fully manual f2.8 prime lenses, such as 24mm, 50mm, and 100mm (about doubling each step from 14mm, and skipping "intermediates" like 20mm, 28mm, 35mm, and 85mm, which also would duplicate their existing FL's).

I have to say that I respectfully totally disagree with you!  ;)

For me, those kind of lens wouldn't have much of a market. I think it would be much more interesting for Samyang to produce very fast lens, for instance a 50mm f/1.2 or f/1. I personally can't find much use for a f/2.8 standard prime and even then, you can easily find old manual lens on eBay that are plenty sharp at f2.8 for less than 100$, sometime even less than 35$!

“The Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art is the most exciting lens we’re likely to review this year."

I got rid of all my 50s largely because they are so boring.  If this is the most exciting lens they're likely to review this year, it's going to be a pretty rotten year.

They should review the Tamron 150-600.  That lens has 10 times the excitement of yet another 50mm prime.

I also have to respectfully totally disagree with you!

I am sure that I am not the only one for whom the 50mm is a personnal favorite, and I would even go as far as saying that in is one of the most complex FL. You might dislike it, as any lens of any FL are just tools, I have no problem understanding this, but I would never qualify it as boring. Disliking a certain tool for your craft doesn't mean it is bad per se, but rather that it is not for you. I am sure a look at Henry Cartier-Bresson photographs would convince you.

11
As someone who has not shot any video on my DSLRs, can someone explain to me the value in spending 4k on a 50mm zeiss lens to mount on a DSLR that is going to down sample the image to 2 mega pixels?

Because its not all down to dslr now is it.... The Otus will work wonders on a RED or Sony F55 and handle very well...


The market is even bigger since the metabone speedboasters are getting more and more popular. People are now using EF lens on all sorts of camera, like the Sony FS-700 and BMCC for instance.

12
Lenses / Re: Review: Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 Distagon T*
« on: February 26, 2014, 09:53:53 AM »
I looked at the review - very impressive at 1.4. It is the contrast between sharpness of focus plane that sets off the bokeh - aka EF 85 1.2.

However in the comparisons I looked up TDP crops of the Nikkor 58 1.4G. What's going on there !? Have you seen the price of this lens ? Nikon is currently like a child's spinning top just as it loses it's momentum; it wobbles all over the place.

Lucky for us Canon users that Zeiss are pushing the boundaries   - 'cos Nikon certainly aren't.

Incidentally I believe the Otus is made in Germany; it's the other dslr 'Zeiss' lenses that are made by Cosina in Japan.

If you want a good laugh, check this review of the 58 1.4G : http://www.lenstip.com/397.4-Lens_review-Nikon_Nikkor_AF-S_58_mm_f_1.4G_Image_resolution.html

The new 58 1.4G actually performs noticeably worst than the old 58 1.2 film lens, which dates, I think, from the 70's.

13
Can you imagine? "Sorry the image isn't very good but the lens is so light!"
You must be talking about the new Nikon 58mm - LOL

That is one remarkable combination of sky-high price and unimpressive performance.

Just because it performs worse than the Nikon 58mm produced in 1970 doesn't mean it's performance are unimpressive. Oh wait, it does…

14
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sigma 50 f/1.4 Art Lens Should be Amazing
« on: January 15, 2014, 09:45:11 PM »
It may just be me, but I can't get at all excited about any 50mm lens. I just find the focal length uninteresting. I suppose it has to do with how we "see" images, but I find myself composing most shots at either the wide or long end.
I'm drawn to the 24mm focal length myself, but for me, there's a distinct challenge in using the 50mm.  It's so "normal" that it takes a lot of work to make distinctive photos with it.  I think I remember reading something about Cartier-Bresson having felt that way and it stuck with me.

It would be logical. If I am not mistaking, when he was shooting for himself, Cartier-Bresson only used a 50mm lens. He thought that by always working with the same focal would help it become as an "extension" of his eye. Looking at his work, I can only agree with him.

15
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Will vintage lenses help me find the way?
« on: January 11, 2014, 09:18:00 AM »
+1...if you not in hurry, wait for x-mas holidays. BH has great deals on EF and L lenses.

I'm envious of the low prices on camera gear in USA. :D
I think that the shipping costs and customs fees would nullify any savings.
And i can't see myself staying for a whole year with just a 28-135 and a nifty fifty.... :P

+1, we suffer from a lot more tax  ::)

I don't know where exactly you are from, but in Québec (Canada), it is a bit ridiculous! Gear sold at B&H is cheaper with taxes, customs and shipping than here before taxes (and we have 14,975% of taxes).

I'm in the Netherlands, 21% tax  :-\

Ahahahah, well, you beat us!  :P

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