December 22, 2014, 12:20:54 AM

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Messages - tolusina

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1
Canon General / Re: How does one close/delete one's account ?
« on: December 21, 2014, 09:25:17 PM »
....What is KA2 ?........
Out of context, I thought it was a Pentax lens mount, in context, I'd ask the same.........

2
Canon General / Re: Thanks Adorama and Helen Oster !
« on: December 21, 2014, 06:26:22 PM »
......
We had a FedEx order that went from New York to Atlanta to London to Atlanta to London to Atlanta to London to Atlanta to Montreal to Ottawa..........
That's pathetically humorous.
Sounds like some clerk in Atlanta had never heard of London, ON, and again........

3
Canon General / Re: Thanks Adorama and Helen Oster !
« on: December 19, 2014, 02:09:19 PM »
.......
I'm looking forward to pre-ordering that new 50MP camera from Adorama when it arrives!

They have it in stock right now !

Affiliate Link Removed by Mod.

APOLOGY  That vigilink Affiliate code is being added by the forum.  I was not aware of it, so I'll figure it out.  - Admin.

I found it, a recent ad-on puts the vigilink in any link posted to a web store.  It also makes it very slow to open for me.

P.S.

I'd love to have a Pentax 645(Z), but the cost of good lenses put me off.

4
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: ENELOOP ????
« on: December 18, 2014, 04:16:26 PM »
.....One thing I should mention. The 2100mAh Imdedion batteries are a little "fat"......
I've run into some "fat" MiMHs in the past. Removing the wrapper/labeling allowed them to fit and led to brilliant failures in some devices if the (now) electrically uninsulated housings were allowed to short together.
 
Thanks too as Surapon posted regarding the tip to the Imdedion brand, I hadn't heard of that one either. A little googleing found this...  http://www.mahaenergy.com/ YES!! They have NiMH "D" cells and chargers, I have projects!!

5
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: ENELOOP ????
« on: December 18, 2014, 03:56:54 PM »
.....

Avoid very fast chargers.
Chargers that complete charge in less than 2 hours, causing overheating and deteriorating the batteries.

Chargers completing the load between 2 and 4 hours are ideal for maintaining the health of your batteries.

I have a several years old Lenmar fast charger, charges four AAs in about 15 minutes, or four AAAs in about 7 minutes.
Batteries are indeed a little warm at the end of a charging cycle but nothing I'd consider hot. I figure "hot" for something like this to be anything you can't hand hold as long as you like.

I've not noticed any apparent detrimental effects to batteries charged in this unit, admittedly I haven't attempted any sort of controlled comparisons either.
 
Just tried to test/measure charging time and temperature, dang, no cells depleted enough for a valid test.
 
I have noticed that this Lenmar hasn't been available for years nor have I found anything similar, I figure there must be a good reason for that.
 
This Lenmar has almost as much venting as housing and a very conspicuous fan, possibly a fire hazard if operated with blocked vents or with a failed fan. That's plenty good reason they should be and are NLA.
---
While I don't expect to ever know, I do wonder how much consumer protection hyperbole vs. real science regarding battery health is involved in manufacturer's slower (2 to 4 hour) charging time recommendations.

I'm over it already, consigned to slower charge times as soon as Lenmar's fan gets much louder and I have to replace it.
Meanwhile, it's probably best if i don't use Lenmar unattended.


 

6
Portrait / Re: Low Key Portraits- share your low key photos here
« on: December 18, 2014, 03:18:16 PM »
Twins?
 
Great photos, I'm guessing you are both pleased.

7
Photography Technique / Re: EC - adds or subtracts light?
« on: December 18, 2014, 03:12:48 PM »
+EV compensation = more light through larger aperture (smaller f/) or slower shutter (1/smaller) and/or an increase in sensitivity (do show increased sensitivity at lunch, whoever wins) higher ISO.
 
-EV = less light or ISO.
---
From Wikipedia.....
"In optics, the f-number (sometimes called focal ratio, f-ratio, f-stop, or relative aperture[1]) of an optical system is the ratio of the lens's focal length to the diameter of the entrance pupil."

So, the larger the physical opening of the lens, the closer it is to the lens' focal length, the lower the ratio.

8
Lighting / Re: AYDINLATMADA ENERJİ TASARRUFU ve YÖNTEMLERİ NELERDİR.
« on: December 18, 2014, 02:10:55 PM »
Ülkemizde  üretilen toplam enerji kaynağının %25‟i Çeşitli aydınlatma hizmetlerinde kullanılmaktadır.çevremizde oldukça sık olarakKullanılan akkor flamanlı ışıklı ampuller  elektrik akımının %95‟ini ısıya çevirerek, sadece şok küçük bir kısmını ışığa dönüştürmek suretiyle aydınlatma imkanı sağlamaktadır.E27,GU10,MR16,G13, duylu 12V,24V,220V  ampulle  aydınlanan yerlerde bir takım olumsuzluklardan biride sıcak iklimlerde ampullerden kaynaklanan ilave ısı sıcaklığını azaltmak için klima kullanımı ihtiyacının daha fazla artmasıdır demektir. www.silverled.netSon zamanlarda oldukça gelişmiş olan kompakt T5,T8 LED Floresanlar gereksiz ıısınmalara meyil  vermediği  gibi Tasarruflu ampule göre yaklaşık olarak 5 katı daha fazla verimli aydınlatma sağlamaktadır.Örnek verecek olursak , 100 Watlık  gücünde bir lambanın sağladığı ışık miktarına eş değerde SMD 2835,5630,5050 veya 5730 modelinden 20 Watt‟lık mercekli  LED Ampulden daha çok verim  sağlamak mümkündür. Verimli ve markalı olan lambaların diğer bir avantajı  kullanım sürelerine bağlı olarak normal piyasadaki ampullere göre çok daha dayanıklı olmasıdır.

Google translates from Turkish............

25% of the total energy produced in our country "i kullanılmaktadır.çevre us quite often in various lighting service olarakkullanıl 95% of incandescent light bulbs, electric current" in turning the heat, just the possibility of light by converting a small part of the light shock sağlamaktadır.e27, GU10, MR16, G13 , cap 12V, 24V, 220V light bulb lit in place to reduce the extra heat caused by the heat lamps in hot climates, one of a team is more negativity increased use of air conditioning is needed. www.silverled.netso time in highly advanced compact T5, T8 LED Fluorescent unnecessary ıısın mAlArA we be saving as gradient to give the light bulb according to yield approximately 5 times more efficient lighting sağlamaktadır.örnek 100 watts power equivalent to the amount of light provided by a lamp, SMD 2835, 5630.5050 or 5730 model from 20 Watt "health lens can provide a more efficient LED bulb. Another advantage of efficient and label depending on the lamp lifetime is much more durable than regular bulbs in the market.
---
Doesn't look photography related, maybe it's spam?

9
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: ENELOOP ????
« on: December 18, 2014, 01:32:26 PM »
Dear teacher, fellow student, traveler and friend Surapon,
 
Your decision depends on your intended use case.
The key is in the mAh rating.
mAh = milli (thousandth) Amp hour capacity.
To add a little perspective, the standard Eneloop is rated at 2000 mAh which can also be thought of as 2 Ah.
 
Anyway, the Eneloop Lites can be recharged the most times during their life span but they will be the slowest at recharging your flashes and you'll get the fewest flashes per charge.
If your flash rate is low and you are only firing flash a few times per shoot as in static product shooting a few products, these are the ones.
 
The PROs will cycle your flashes considerably faster and you'll get significantly more flashes per charge but you get the fewest recharge cycles of the three choices.
If you are shooting events with heavy, rapid flash use, these should be your choice.
 
The Standards obviously fall in the middle.
 
Ah, compromises to choose between, same like so many things in life.
 
Sincerely,
Ron

edit.......
Panasonic? Sanyo? I don't know what to make of this......
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?ipp=100&sts=ma&N=0&setIPP=100&srtclk=itemspp&Ntt=Eneloop
...... edit

10
Lenses / Re: Buying Advice: What First Lens for a Full Frame?
« on: December 16, 2014, 07:43:56 PM »
.....I should also note that I'm on a very tight budget. ....
Then there's only one right answer, EF 50mm f/1.8 II.
http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup/ef_50mm_f_1_8_ii
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/12142-USA/Canon_2514A002_Normal_EF_50mm_f_1_8.html
It's built like a toy, seriously, like Hasbro quality. Canon should create a marketing arm for these that sounds like a Western Pacific mainland cheap rip off, Canhoon maybe?
 
Cheap feel aside, it's got great IQ, fast focus, f/1.8 is pretty fast for low light, a more or less natural perspective, you can't go wrong with it. It just works and works very well.
 
50's were the "Standard" lens way back when, they've been made so long they've been rather refined for quite a while.
 
Working with a prime's limitations sure sharpens one's compositional skill set, zoom with your feet and all that that statement implies.
 
The 40mm Pancake is a little more money, has a very solid, professional build quality feel.
At f/2.8 it's not as low light fast as the 50mm, doesn't focus anywhere near as snappy as the 50 though the 50 is sometimes too fast and overshoots then hunts back.
The 40mm has an STM (stepping motor) for focusing that is both a curse and a feature.
The STM makes a groan/whine noise when running, non-mechanical and fully electronic focus goes to sleep rather quickly and then you cannot manual focus until you wake it again.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/870179-REG/Canon_40mm_f_2_8_EF_Pancake.html
 

11
Technical Support / Re: Happy ending...
« on: December 14, 2014, 06:04:00 PM »
 TLDR version,
Calibrate a wide gamut monitor, profile each printer/ink/paper combination to be used, soft proof in software such as Lightroom, you WILL smile at the results.
- - -

 
At the risk of being full of nonsense, here's my take on colors and printing.
- -
With my previous Monitor/PC/Printer set ups, all I ever got when printing was frustrated and poorer due to the expense of wasted paper and ink.
So I built a new Monitor/PC/Printer set up specifically with as near to total control of color as I could learn to do.
 
My conception of current high resolution displays is that they excel at pixel peeping tasks, unless they also display wide color gamut, high res by itself is not all we need, seek or wish for.
So, #1 monitor spec to seek should be wide gamut, there are a number of currently available displays from several vendors capable of 99%+ aRGB.

 
Then we want to add color calibration capability to/for that aRGB color space.
We also need to consider ambient light while viewing our calibrated aRGB monitor.
Shop x-rite
http://www.xrite.com/
and
datacolor
http://www.datacolor.com/
 
A self quote from a previous post in another thread, Custom ICC Printer Profiles
..........
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/838847-REG/Datacolor_S4SR100_Spyder4_Print_SR.html

I'm liking it a lot. It's the last link in the color managed workflow chain.

I soft proof in Lightroom using the icc profile specific to the paper/printer/ink I'm using, prints match what I see on screen close enough that I usually only print once.
I use downloaded icc profiles only to get a general idea of how a particular paper will print, a paper shopping aid. I'll soft proof and print with downloaded profiles only when I've bought a sampler pack and only have two sheets of a particular paper to work with.
 
I find the printer profiling process tedious, time consuming and very gratifying in the end. I consider it time and money well spent.
---
I calibrate the monitor just prior to print proofing and printing.
Monitor thoroughly warmed up for at least two hours, done at night with room lights off, I start the X-Rite process, come back in ten minutes or so when it's done.
 
Print profiles are essentially error files.
The profiling software sends a print job to the printer of a couple of pages of specific colored squares.
The spectrocolorimeter is then used to read/measure the actual colors printed, software knows what colors it told the printer to print, it now knows what colors the printer actually printed and generates an error correcting icc profile.
Softproofing then corrects to monitor's display to show what the printer will do.
 
Take thoughtful care when naming your custom profiles descriptively, don't just date them or number them sequentially.
I include a printer designation as well as paper name, if I was switching inks around, I'd include that too.

 
 The monitor I chose is an NEC PA242W-BK-SV
http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/pa242w-bk-sv
 It's got an extensive list of specs and features (much of it beyond me), its included and model/type specific x-rite/Spectraview II color calibration solution means that when the PC tells the monitor to display #000000, I'm assured that the red I see is really red and, um, it is really really red, so red it literally hurts to look at for long periods.
- -
This particular NEC also has the capability to use icc printer profiles, negating the need to soft proof in software such as Lightroom.
In practice, the procedure of switching from the calibrated monitor LUT to an icc profile modified view is tedious, time consuming and frustrating, snappy A<>B comparisons are just not possible.
Further, in NEC's own words,

 
About ICC Profile Emulation
MultiProfiler uses industry standard ICC (International
Color Consortium) color profiles to emulate the output of
a particular device. ICC profiles contain data representing
the color characteristics of a device, such as a printer, film,
or display. MultiProfiler uses this information to create an
internal 3D LUT to emulate the selected device, and this
is saved to a preset in the display. While this preset is not
quite as accurate as a soft proof in professional photo or
video editing software, it does provide quick access to an
emulation of the ICC profile.”

 
So, I suggest an emphatic NO to using MultiProfiler for softproofing, softproofing in Lightroom is far preferable.
- - -
I spent rather large both in expense and research time assembling my current Monitor/PC/Printer set up plus switching away from my worn out Nikon crop gear to 6D kit + 40mm pancake + 2X 600EX-RTs +  ST-E3-RT + Pro-100 plus a raft of associated what nots, I can barely describe my delight when my very first print came out exactly as I desired, no waste, no tweaks, no disatisfaction.
 
 No part of this particular color management system hands any part of color management to the PC's operating system. The display is handled by NEC's Spectraview II and hardware LUTs, icc error files are used for softproofing in Lightroom. For me, it all now just works.

 
I feel I'm now at the point I can step up to a large format roll printer and a MF Pentax 645Z and confidently expect gratifying results.
Now to convince my budget.......
- -

 

 

 

12
Technical Support / Re: Optimal processing platform of still images
« on: December 11, 2014, 09:28:09 PM »
Old thread but this just occurred to me. One the of the best things about editing on the Mac vs PC is that the OSX is RAW aware. OSX has an imbedded RAW converter that all applications can access. It even displays thumbnails of RAWs in folder windows and can open RAW using the imbedded image viewer. That's huge IMO if I want to search for a file without launching lightroom. ......
There's an old and stickied thread in the technical section regarding a downloadable Microsoft codec pack........
http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=8503.0
I don't recall for sure if I had to install that pack on Windows 7, I think I probably did.

The file browser (Windows Explorer) can indeed show thumbnails of CR2 files if thumbnail view is selected.

The built in Image Viewer can also display CR2s, I just tried it and it appears to show the real RAW without in camera corrections as well as the in camera processed jpg (shot RAW + jpg).

Not all apps can access CR2s though, Paint couldn't, don't know what else can't.
 
No 7DII support yet.

13
Oh geez, I have more bikes than lenses camera bodies, I have given up the lycra though.

Camera along on bike rides = bliss.

14
Speedlites, Printers, Accessories / Re: Custom ICC Printer Profiles
« on: December 11, 2014, 02:58:31 PM »
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/838847-REG/Datacolor_S4SR100_Spyder4_Print_SR.html

I'm liking it a lot. It's the last link in the color managed workflow chain.

I soft proof in Lightroom using the icc profile specific to the paper/printer/ink I'm using, prints match what I see on screen close enough that I usually only print once.
I use downloaded icc profiles only to get a general idea of how a particular paper will print, a paper shopping aid. I'll soft proof and print with downloaded profiles only when I've bought a sampler pack and only have two sheets of a particular paper to work with.
 
I find the printer profiling process tedious, time consuming and very gratifying in the end. I consider it time and money well spent.
---
I calibrate the monitor just prior to print proofing and printing.
Monitor thoroughly warmed up for at least two hours, done at night with room lights off, I start the X-Rite process, come back in ten minutes or so when it's done.
 
Print profiles are essentially error files.
The profiling software sends a print job to the printer of a couple of pages of specific colored squares.
The spectrocolorimeter is then used to read/measure the actual colors printed, software knows what colors it told the printer to print, it now knows what colors the printer actually printed and generates an error correcting icc profile.
Softproofing then corrects to monitor's display to show what the printer will do.
 
Take thoughtful care when naming your custom profiles descriptively, don't just date them or number them sequentially.
I include a printer designation as well as paper name, if I was switching inks around, I'd include that too.

15
Landscape / Re: Mountains, Lakes and Rivers
« on: December 10, 2014, 06:04:04 PM »

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