March 04, 2015, 06:00:33 PM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - jonjt

Pages: [1] 2 3
1
Just picked up mine.  Hopeful there will be no issues. 

2
EOS Bodies / Re: Possible Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Spec Talk [CR2]
« on: February 22, 2015, 03:12:21 PM »
There is NO WAY that Canon will decrease megapixel count. Megapixels can only go up, never down as that is difficult for marketing to overcome. They could only go down by creating a new camera on a different line for a special purpose. Otherwise, for MP to go down, the specs would have to be incredible. 1DX type specs. Canon isn't going to hand down the 1DX sensor and shutter to the 5D line. I don't remember a 2nd tier pro camera inheriting the previous generation flagship specs. The flagship models keep certain strengths for longer.

You mean like the a7s? Did that camera not make waves, even though its pixel count was way down over the original a7 cameras?

There is a reason the pixel count went down.

Remember, Canon are a follower, not a leader. Sony showed that there is a market for such a camera, now Canon will follow because they are too timid to lead.

I think he is saying that Canon isnt going to decrease the MP count for a general purpose 5Div.  I agree with him, in that case.  Should this camera end up being a low light version, then the specs make sense.  And in that case, id also expect to see a 20-something MP 5d, in addition.

3
EOS Bodies / Re: Possible Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Spec Talk [CR2]
« on: February 22, 2015, 12:44:06 PM »
Maybe this is for the low light version of the new 5d generation.  However, i dont expect Canon to seriously release a 1dx in a 5d body and try to sell it as the general purpose, prosumer FF solution. 

4
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Still Live: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $1999
« on: February 18, 2015, 11:36:03 PM »
Just went to go pull the trigger and found that all were sold.   All 2288 of them. Wow.....

5
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Still Live: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $1999
« on: February 18, 2015, 05:25:06 PM »
Thank you, Raptor 3x and privatebydesign.  I will reconsider buying grey.

6
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Still Live: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $1999
« on: February 18, 2015, 04:31:27 PM »
Hi all.

I wanted to get a 5Diii that wasn't grey market, so I can make use of the warranty, if I needed it.  However, if magic lantern voids the warranty, spending more for a US market camera may not be worth it.  So, does anyone know if you can still get a US market 5Diii serviced under warranty, if magic lantern is removed?

If I can, I may jump on this deal.

There are lots of independent repair shops that will do out of warranty repairs.

So, Canon won't even touch grey market cameras?  Not even for pay? And if i were to get a US market 5Diii and remove magic lantern from it for servicing, canon would still say no?

7
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Still Live: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $1999
« on: February 18, 2015, 04:16:46 PM »
Hi all.

I wanted to get a 5Diii that wasn't grey market, so I can make use of the warranty, if I needed it.  However, if magic lantern voids the warranty, spending more for a US market camera may not be worth it.  So, does anyone know if you can still get a US market 5Diii serviced under warranty, if magic lantern is removed?

If I can, I may jump on this deal.

8
Canon General / Re: Imaging Resource: Canon Q&A @ CP+ 2015
« on: February 17, 2015, 12:52:25 PM »
There were no substantial or tough questions at all. No word about how long the outdated 500nm prozess will remain, why they have so much more readout noise than Exmor etc and nothing about any week points. The journalist fears to no be invited anymore, and gave a Marketing platform for the executive or was just to week personality to ask more tough, just allowed the executive to hide behind politeness.

And to be unpolite, the 5ds and 5dsr are in no way revolutionary, not even evolutionary, just more megapixel. That is what we see since the beginning of digital. They just catch up with the processing power of the 1dx, which is towards the end of life. This proofes that Digic 6 is no real improvement or that there is another bottleneck in the dataflow.

We can be sure, there is no improvement in DR, they would have mentioned it, even if there would be a developpment on the way. We can be sure, we will get no better sensor in the 5d4, and of course not in the 1dx successor, which is more about high iso and fastness.

Lets invest in some more expensive glass, and lets hope for the 5dsii

I was holding out for the 5D4, just to see what, if any, improvements they make in architecture or design.  But, with the release of these two cameras, I'm not so confident that any significant improvements in sensor architecture is going to happen.  What I may do instead is wait until the 5D4 is announced, and then pick up a lightly used 5D3 for under 2K.  It would be a significant improvement upon my 7D, regardless.

9
What does it mean to be "4k image ready"?  My general understanding was that cine lenses tend to be of higher optical quality and transmittance uniformity than DSLR lenses.  And, since DSLR lenses handle much higher resolutions than 4k readily, I would assume that any cine lens can handle it no problem.  Considering the technically literate nature of people who can spend $4500 on a lens, why would Tokina say this?  It seems similar to Poland Spring selling water, while claiming it is wet.

"duh"

10
EOS Bodies / Re: Sony Sensors Coming to Canon DSLRs? [CR1]
« on: December 15, 2014, 04:17:28 PM »
I'll wait until I see what the 5D mkIV offers, before I lend any weight to this. 

11
The 7DII seems to handle smooth gradients and constant tones WAY better than the 7D did.  That was a major issue I had with the 7D.

In any case, the 5DIII definitely shows more detail, and less chroma and luminescence noise at high ISO than the 7DII does.  But man, you really have to look for it.  I'm questioning if its worthwhile to pay twice as much for a refurbished 5DIII and 24-105, when I can "simply" buy a new 7DII and not have to deal with the transition to FF.  I tend to shoot slow moving targets more often but still, the 7DII is compelling.

Now you done it! How dare you suggest full frame might not be worth the investment!

Seriously, even though I switched from 7D I to 5DIII about a year ago, I'd have to say you really do need to think long and hard about whether or not it's worth the price of entry to full frame. I would say it depends in part on what lenses you already own because, as you correctly point out, it's not just the cost of the body, it's the cost of the lenses as well.

Clearly the gap is narrowing and while there always will be a gap, it is moving more and more toward the margins.

Now, expect to see an avalanche of posts from full framers telling you how APS-C can never compete with full frame. But, just remember, we have to justify our investment.

Yeah, I'd have to replace my standard zoom and my wide angle zoom.  That's almost 4k dollars.  I'd probably get 1500 dollars from selling my 11-16, 17-55 and my 7D.  I'm just not sure it's worth it, in comparison to what I can get from the 7DII.

In any case, I'm going to wait until the 5DIV is released, before making a decision.

12
The 7DII seems to handle smooth gradients and constant tones WAY better than the 7D did.  That was a major issue I had with the 7D.

In any case, the 5DIII definitely shows more detail, and less chroma and luminescence noise at high ISO than the 7DII does.  But man, you really have to look for it.  I'm questioning if its worthwhile to pay twice as much for a refurbished 5DIII and 24-105, when I can "simply" buy a new 7DII and not have to deal with the transition to FF.  I tend to shoot slow moving targets more often but still, the 7DII is compelling.

13
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon Announces CN20x50 Cine-Servo Ultra Zoom Lens
« on: October 16, 2014, 12:58:06 PM »
This thing is going to be well over 100k

14
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon Says Higher Resolution Sensors Are Coming Soon
« on: September 26, 2014, 04:40:44 PM »


I just wanted to do a full jrista quote at least one time, too :-p ...

... and care to comment that you have to take care of inflation, because when Canon has moved to a smaller process, faveon or quantum sensors it might be 2100 and you're money has gone :->

Lets hope my investments beat inflation over that period. 

In any case, if Canon doesnt do something big for the 5DIV, I'll just get a 5DIII and be done with it.  The move to FF will give me a big upgrade anyway.

15
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon Says Higher Resolution Sensors Are Coming Soon
« on: September 26, 2014, 10:29:02 AM »
Could you expound on what "so far ahead" means?  I'm curious why Canon's sensors are dead last in terms of performance and innovation.

See below.

What is a fact and what is relevant is not always the same.  It depends on the individual and the situation.  It is a fact that the Sony sensor is better in certain situations.  But that fact is not relevant for all photographers.  Obviously it is relevant to some such as yourself — I am not disputing that.

You are still missing the point. :P You keep going back to perceptual factors...subjective factors...things that change from person to person. Some people may only use ISO 400-1600 for their photography, and the DR they get from a Canon sensor is more than enough for their needs. Great. But that has nothing to do with what I'm usually talking about.

You keep injecting these external subjective factors, when they simply don't matter when it comes down to the technology. You get annoyed that I say Canon sensors are far behind everyone else. Why? This has nothing to do with whether Canon sensors are good enough for you personally. If they are, GREAT! That's wonderful.

However just because a sensor is good enough for you, or good enough for John and Jane Doe over here, doesn't change the facts. The simple fact of the matter is, Canon sensor technology is really old. They have made minor evolutionary changes here and there, but fundamentally, it's still developed on an ancient process, with old 200mm wafers with lower quality silicon, on a very very old 500nm process, resulting in lower quantum efficiency, lower energy efficiency, lower yield rates, etc.

These are simple facts. It simply is what is...that is the state of Canon sensor technology. They have pushed the 500nm process REALLY freakin far...which in one sense is quite admirable from a "Getting your money's worth" from a particular fabrication process. However, at this point, it's become their Achilles' Heel...the technology is presenting limitations, and while they could keep pushing things, doing so is more likely to hurt performance even more than not. For example, on a 500nm process, the transistors and wiring take up a certain amount of die space. Why hasn't Canon shot strait to 36mp yet, or 47mp? Fill factor would become a concern...they might get more megapixels, but their older technology is probably going to hurt their IQ with smaller pixels on a FF sensor more than benefit it...relative to the competition. The competition is using 180nm and 130nm processes (maybe even smaller, 90nm), which require far less die space, resulting in fewer fill factor problems, making it a lot easier to push pixel count without losing overall light gathering capacity (which impacts overall performance.)

Canon has done an admirable job with the 500nm process, but given the design decisions they have been making the last few years, it seems clear to me that the large transistor size is holding them back. I mean, we are talking about 2000-era fabrication technology here...it's REALLY old. I don't know why Canon hasn't moved to a more advanced process, with larger 300mm wafers made from better silicon. They have 180nm fabs capable of laying down copper interlink wiring (which is much more efficient), which do use 300mm wafers and which are made from better silicon. Those fabs have already produced high efficiency sensors with 59% Q.E. (which is much closer to the top of the line Sony sensors, which are topping 60% these days). Canon has better technology...they simply are not employing it in their APS-C and FF sensors. They are still employing very dated fabrication technology and techniques for these sensors...and the impact of that older technology is quite apparent when you start digging down into Canon RAW data.

I do astrophotography, have for about eight months now. For astrophotography, working the linear signal is very important. Processing astro "sub frames" is very different from processing a RAW normally for regular kinds of photography. You work the data in linear space a lot first, before "stretching" it with an MTF curve. When your working the linear data, it's easy to see the differences. Canon data is very, very noisy, and lacks in color fidelity in the lower echelons of the signal. Exmor data (I've only worked with it from D800 cameras) is far cleaner, with richer data way down near the noise floor. CCD data is the cleanest, with extremely clean, random noise and ultra low dark current (which means the darkest parts of the signal are very smooth, without hot pixels and dark current noise intruding into the signal.) The difference between Canon RAW data and CCD data is huge. The difference between D800 RAW data and CCD is a lot smaller. Some astrophotographers who have applied the black point hack have been referring to D800 data as "near-CCD quality", which is something no one has ever said about Canon data.

The differences are real. Hence the reason I refer to this stuff as fact.

Whether the differences affect your particular kind of photography is a whole different thing. That is not concrete, factual information. It's a matter of perception. It's a matter of subjective judgement. That isn't incorrect, however, it doesn't change the facts either. Not everyone needs to use every part of the sensor. Some people simply don't care about shadow falloff quality. Some people prefer high contrast, in which case they are going to tighten up that contrast curve and crush the blacks anyway. Some people shoot at an ISO range where there are minimal differences between different sensor types. If you don't utilize the RAW signal information in a way that reveals the problems with Canon sensors, GREAT!

However, just because you don't utilize the the RAW signal that way doesn't mean no one does. Again, that doesn't change the FACTS. Canon sensors are fabricated with old technology...a very old, very large 500nm process, on 200mm wafers (most companies stopped using those period years ago, and the ones that still do are not manufacturing huge sensors on them...everyone else uses higher grade 300mm wafers). Canon's readout system is also getting rather dated, and is still utilizing high frequency ADC units (and only a few of them) to handle all the pixel data coming off the sensor, which is largely where their very high DR-killing read noise comes from (many manufacturers have moved to on-die ADC units, one per column, that are able to operate at much lower DR-preserving frequencies that don't generate nearly as much noise), as well as even combining all the image processing into a stacked sensor+DSP package, which shortens transfer bus from centimeters to microns, which also reduces the places where noise can seep into the signal. Canon uses really old sensor technology for their APS-C and FF sensors.

If they change that (they should, at some point...personally I think it's long overdue, but there is probably some logistical or budgetary reason why they haven't yet), and move to their newer fab that uses 300mm wafers and a much higher end 180nm fabrication process, Canon sensor tech would rocket forward. By the time Canon actually does that, 180nm will already be "last generation"...companies are already moving from 180nm and 130nm processes to 90nm processes...but at least the 180nm process is much newer and more advanced. It won't limit Canon's ability to shrink pixel size at the cost of fill factor. It will probably make a move to BSI for APS-C and FF parts much more viable with much smaller pixels. A LOT of good, on the purely technological front, could be realized simply by moving off their 500nm process onto their 180nm process.

Don Haines has a theory that Canon is waiting for P&S sensor production to ramp down on their 180nm fab before they crank up production for APS-C and FF sensors there. I think that's a highly plausible explanation for why they haven't moved to a better, more modern fabrication process and more modern sensor designs yet. Personally, I have to figure that with a 50% or larger contraction in the P&S market the last couple of years, Canon should already have the ability to start manufacturing newer APS-C sensor designs there at the very least...but there could be other limitations...maybe they have to completely ramp down the P&S manufacture before they can ramp up manufacture for something else, I don't know. Anyway, at some point, it should happen. When is the real question...and everyone has differing opinions on that.

Thanks for the info.  I'll save my money until Canon moves to smaller processes, perhaps a BSI architecture, even.

Pages: [1] 2 3