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Messages - Leejo

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1
Would be an idea for the Magic Lantern development - if one could identify where everything was saved...

2
Software & Accessories / Re: The best tripod ...
« on: April 28, 2014, 06:39:21 AM »
Hi all,

I've spent weeks (or months) now looking into a tripod.
I'm looking at getting a Carbon Fibre on and in particular the 3 Legged Thing - Eric.

The thing I'm getting confused about is getting a "stable" tripod... The 3LT Eric has 3 locks and 4 leg section/segments...
After doing my researching I have in my mind that this isn't stable and I should be looking at only a 3 segment tripod.
Is there completely false? What's people opinions on this?
I have a Three Legged Thing - called Brian.
I am perfectly happy with it - there are a few criticisms - the rubber grips on the locks aren't the best,
and a cover fell off one of my tripod head locks - but they did replace it.
I have it as a travel tripod, hence the choice as it is airplane hand luggage compatible.
The price was also in my budget as well.
I wouldn't necessarily put a 300mm 2.8 or 600mm on it - but then I neither have them or envisage travelling
with them in an airplane either... (without making additional arrangements.)
Excluding Gitzo I consider it to be one of the best travel tripods available here (in Europe).

As with all things there is also a compromise - to get the folded length you need four sections, and it's not 2m / 6 foot tall. But that is pure physics. The monopod leg is also obviously a little on the short side, but that is also logical. Other combinations will have all the same characteristics. It's a travel tripod/monopod - mainly for cities reached by air etc. If I was travelling say in a car,  ad larger lenses, availability of RRS, other budget  then maybe other factors would come into play. for me it hasn't been topped for my purposes.
 

3
EOS Bodies / Re: 7D Mark II on Cameraegg
« on: January 17, 2014, 09:44:53 AM »
And I realize there is the 15-85 and 17-55 options out there, but I don't believe they were kitted with the 7d, though I may be wrong about that.

In some countries in Europe the 15-85 was offered as the kit lens - I know because that was what I purchased.

4
Lenses / Re: January in Japan...Advice?
« on: October 23, 2013, 02:08:46 PM »
For good advice try contacting Martin Bailey -
martinbaileyphotograpy.com
He's from England - lives in Tokyo and has been running tours to see the snow monkeys, and Hokkaido for years.

He has a few old podcasts as well dealing with the trips, what to bring etc.

5
Lenses / Re: I Repaired my own 50mm 1.4, and so can you!
« on: September 06, 2013, 12:47:24 PM »
I followed the same instructions around two months ago, and it looks like I will have to do the same again having dropped the lens again :-(
I did use the one link (to the site in Romania for a few additional pictures)
The instructions could be marginally improved - e.g. step 7 better explained.
What is blatantly missing are the instructions for reassembly, as the odd step or two does require the pieces in the right position, and just how tight the screws should be etc.
Having had three disassembly and assembly operations goes before my lens worked first time though I have the details now in my head....
The steps - of unclipping the element and unattaching and feeding through the cable were the most scary/difficult.
I was forced out of necessity as well. I bought the lens used, and the repair costs would have been around the same cost - and I needed the lens for an upcoming wedding quickly (private not professional).
I was glad to have performed the task - even if it did take several hours.
I do have an engineering background and some experience in such things, so I was of course less nervous than some might be!


6
Canon General / Re: Just For Fun!
« on: July 23, 2013, 09:15:41 AM »
74. Photos presented for the purpose of comparison, that are blatently shot under different conditions.
Especially badly shot photos of garden sheds....

7
Lenses / Re: 50 F1.4 durabilty question
« on: July 09, 2013, 09:15:15 AM »
My 50 1.4 rolled of a table about 1m/3 ft above a wooden floor and suffered the typical focusing damage
(infinity was OK, but below 1.5m was not possible)
The lens was purchased second hand so I decided to take the risk - as a local repair with tax would have
been a reasonable sum. Plus I wanted the lens for a private photos at a wedding coming up soon.
I googled and found a very good description (unfortunately the saved link is not on this PC)
[there could have been some improvements especially the couple of things to note when reassembling]
The first disassemble was very slow as I was very cautious. Then a small amount of bending.
Reassembling meant checking everthing double as well.
After the second go I could do unassemble, fix and assemble almost in my sleep in around half an hour...
I fixed it myself after several tries - each time bending the rotating component a little more back into place.
On the final attempt I also filed the component as well - as I noticed a dent or two.
As it was couldn't attend the wedding - the wife falling ill just beforehand.
I have yet to fully evaluate my fix with AFMA etc. but at least it focuses through the complete range now.

Unfortunately the 40mm pancake is still relatively overpriced here in comparison to the US (as is the EOS-M).
And my other option would have bought the 85mm 1.8 for use on a crop sensor...
So I will stick with it for now - not my most used lens - but still comes in handy.
would certainly wish like a quite a few for an update sometime - but dependent on price and any upgrade to full frame - who knows....



8
Lenses / Re: to TS-E or not to TS-E?
« on: June 21, 2013, 03:55:23 AM »
The 24mm is a fine sharp lens for general purpose use. would suite a lot of landscape photography for you.
However I personally so no serious use of Tilt/Shift without adequate camera support - Tripod or at least resting on a solid surface. There are some fun uses of the lens to create "toy" looks that can be performed handheld - but this is not on your list of subjects.
Maybe you need to consider a more portable travel tripod?

If the cost is the problem Rokinon/Bower/Samyang have a 24mm TS for around half the price - though the reviews seem to indicate that it isn't the sharpest wide open. For learning not critical, and if you are not going to make anything other than online or small prints not critical. If you are shooting buildings you will be most probalby stopping down anyway.
Other disadvantages - some build quality compromises, and resell value should you decide to upgrade.

I would be tempted but my investment in lenses needs to go elsewhere first.

9
For me the answer is easy, I will upgrade to LR5, as I ommitted upgrading to LR4 - without good reason,
although I did try all the releases. So for me it's two updates in one.
My LR3 will remain installed - one never knows.
Then the fun can start - new process version, Location placement in the map module, and trying out the new touchup brush etc. and possible reorganising the catalogue - after three years I feel I need more structure...

10
Lenses / Re: Tele for backpacking
« on: June 03, 2013, 12:31:59 PM »
For those with experience, how are the non-L 70-300 IS or the 70-300 DO?
I am about to upgrade as Deva did, from the 70-300 IS USM non-L  to the 70-300L.
I've had no problems but do notice the difference. (The L version wasn't available when I bought the original)
It's basically a Kit lens quality lens. Maybe fine for an older camera
Although the non-L is half the weight, it isn't that much smaller - and only a third of the price...
However even on a crop camera (7D) it isn't sharp above 200mm.
In comparison it is slower to focus, worse IS, not weather sealed and and a little slower in f stops in the middle range.
The DO is slightly better quality but nowhere near as good as the L Version.


11
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: DSLR Video Questions.
« on: June 03, 2013, 09:49:54 AM »
My questions:
1.   Do I need another monitor besides the LCD on the camera to check focus etc?
Not 100% necessary, but useful. The more you focus pull the more necessary one will be.
You can view at upto 10x for the initial focus.  Eyepiece LCD viewfinders such as Zacuto are available as well

2.   Which is the best slider for price for DSLR?
sorry not my area - try Planet5D or similar websites
3.   Which is the best way to record audio? Do I record on camera or external recorder and sync using a slate? I have a BeachTek DXA-SLR available for free. Is it any good?
External recorder - you can sync then using a slate or software such as pluraleyze. can't comment on the Beachtek
4.   Should I use Magic Lantern software or original Canon RAW? If magic lantern, then which version?
Canopn does not record RAW Video. Regardless of whether you record RAW or not the Magic Lantern is recommended for the 5D3 (not available for the 1DX) for focus peaking etc.
5.   What is the ideal ISO for video? And if not ideal, what is the acceptable range for noise free work.
ISO160 or multiples thereof if required
6.   Is 1/50 the only shutter speed to work at or it does not matter?
You can set the Framerate in the camera - so depending on your output you would set the shutter speed at double that.
7.   Will my Imac be ok for the edit? I will not buy an Imac now until it is refreshed, but just want to prepare myself on the speed of edit.
Can't answer that - but I suspect it would be a little slow for RAW Video editing

Further - one Card ?? You will need several - or a stack of them if recording RAW Video....

ANY help is appreciated sincerely.

Thank you!



12


I've done the corrections for color, WB, noise....I've done cropping, but in Aperture I was doing it with 'retain original aspect'....

I don't know what that original aspect is...hence, my asking.

I'm wanting to know if I want 4x6 prints, if I need to go back to all my images and re-crop them before sending them out...or if the 'native' export from the 5D3 happens to be 4x6...?

Thanks,
C
Original aspect means the same ratio of length to side - so a 4x6 = 8x12 = 2x3 etc.
Conversely you would not be maintaining the aspect ratio if you cropped to e.g. a square image.
The sensor size is nominally 24mmx36mm or 2:3 - so the same as 4x6.
Nothing should be lost on a 4x6.   Othersizes such as 5x7, 8x10 etc. will cause some cropping.
I am not familiar with aperture to know if it supports print sizes, but I expect that it does.

As for format - that will depend on the lab. JPG should be OK for 4x6 etc. For larger prints a TIFF maybe better.

IF these are your first prints you may want a lab that will perform some work on the image - e.g brightness control, as you may otherwise find that your images come out too dark due to you having too bright a monitor.

Further on you may want to see if the lab has ICC profiles for download - this will help in getting more accurate colours.

To start with though I would just send in a number of images in JPG at 4x6 and see what comes out.
You can always learn and improve / change labs later...

13
>> 438 level
i've looked this up and it's about £70
i'm pretty sure the tripod has a spirit level
i assume therefore that's pants and a level is required?
If you are shooting roughly on the level, and have time to adjust the legs to get it level then OK - and you can certainly start that way. But Levelers were invented for a reason - especially for use on uneven ground.


extra plates?
don't quite understand. are u saying u have an extra tripod that holds the lens? how??
is there a youtube video or at least some pics of the setup to see?
Still just the one tripod, however with longer and thereby heavier lenses, the balance is around the foot suport of the lens - and no strain is placed on the mount of the camera body when the foot is attached.
For starters you wont need this - start worrying with/above 70-200 f2.8


fcpx: what's wrong with it?
why is it sooo bad? the reviews i read... the bad thing was that u couldn't run old projects. what else is really bad about it? this was something i was seriously going to buy as well
Nothing probably - though I have no experience. Many people were aggrieved at the changes, but many have learned to get over it and still use it. I personally am using Windows - so it's all adobe for me.

[polariser]: am i ok to buy a kit from ebay for under £25? or are there better branded models that i should choose?
Classic quote - if you are using a $25 Lens and camera put a $25 filter on it. Do not waste your money on GBP25 Polarisers - you need to pay double. Make sure you get a circular and not a linear polariser. Good marks are B+W, Schnider, some Hoyas (e.g. HD Pros) , plus the Camera own brand names. You may only need one  for the largest filter size so get a good one. If you are shooting wide angle you may need to consider getting a slim fit one.

thanks!!

14
EOS Bodies / Re: New AF Technology Coming in July? [CR1]
« on: May 27, 2013, 06:11:30 AM »
simple - it 's   "Done with using AF"
All new Cameras are going to be manual fixed length rangefinders only, with a minimum of f8.
Saves Canon developing new lenses, firmware upgrades, comparisons with Nikon etc. etc. :-)

15
Lenses / Re: Is An UWA Lens Useful on a Crop Sensor?
« on: May 10, 2013, 12:09:21 PM »
Quote
Is it OK, then, to turn this into a Tokina 11-16 vs Canon 10-22 thread?  It'll likely be a mix of indoors, landscape, outdoor buildings, large group shots and experimenting.
I have the canon 15-85mm as well. Can't yet afford a FullFrame and still waiting for excellent WA zooms there
(OK 14mm + 16-35 would be a great combo)
I went for the Sigma after reading a review or two. Most revealing was the combined reviews at http://www.the-digital-picture.com

The reason for my choice - nmy personal travel photography, capturing the inside of some buildings, especially churches, without the effort of stitching etc. Yes it's slower, but I'd rather rest it for one shot - bracketed or multiple shots if I am worried that I may shake, as oppose to worrying about lining up shots for stitching.

For what you list, and having the 15-85 already, I wouldn't necessarily think that the Sigma is the best.
(Plus no easy filter fixing) The Tokina has slightly more CA than the others. The Canon will probably hold it's value longer. Prices are similar enough not to get too hung up on the difference. Otherwise from your list
Indoors - unless you need extremes (Sigma) then the Tokina at f2.8
Landscape - equally good - Canon might edge it due to a mm wider and less CA
Outdoor Buildings - Canon edge as above
Large Groups Shots - all OK.
Experimenting - Sigma for the angle - (Tokina for the f2.8)

You pays your money you takes your choice...

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