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Messages - Famateur

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1
Photography Technique / Re: Help: lightning photography?
« on: July 18, 2014, 03:39:33 PM »
I once programmed an old TI-82 graphing calculator to act as an intervalometer for my G12, and it worked beautifully. Not sure the cable/jack is the same as for the 70D...maybe I should take a look! :)

Huzzah! The jack is the same on the 70D as it is on the G12. The cable fits!

I'm going to go dig up my TI-82 and try my luck again...  :P

Success!!!

The TI-82 intervalometer works with the 70D, just like it did with the G12. I would expect that it will work with all the Rebel/XXXD models, too. Just check to see if the camera input uses a 3.5MM jack and not some proprietary connector.

For anyone who is interested, here's a link to instructions: http://www.instructables.com/id/Turn-a-TI-Graphing-Calculator-into-an-Intervalomet/?ALLSTEPS

Here's the program code specific to the TI-82:

: Prompt A
: While 1
: For (H,1,A,1)
: End
: Send(A)
: End

----------------------

Just choose your camera settings and then start the program, entering the number that will produce the interval you desire. I think 100 corresponds roughly with 1 second. I'm pretty sure it sends the signal to trigger on that interval, regardless of the shutter setting, so you'll want to figure that in when you choose your interval.

I hope this is helpful to someone! :D

2
Photography Technique / Re: Help: lightning photography?
« on: July 18, 2014, 01:25:12 PM »
I once programmed an old TI-82 graphing calculator to act as an intervalometer for my G12, and it worked beautifully. Not sure the cable/jack is the same as for the 70D...maybe I should take a look! :)
Huzzah! The jack is the same on the 70D as it is on the G12. The cable fits!

I'm going to go dig up my TI-82 and try my luck again...  :P

3
Photography Technique / Re: Help: lightning photography?
« on: July 18, 2014, 12:35:02 PM »
I use f22, iso 100-250 and shutter speed 30 seconds. if there is a lightning strike within 30 seconds it will be in the pic. I focus manually on a treeline or the farthest object I can see. I simply point the camera where the most action is coming from, push the button, 30 seconds passes, push it again till I'm tired of doing it.

This is how I do it, too.

Unfortunately, Magic Lantern isn't available for the 70D, so I do it manually. I once programmed an old TI-82 graphing calculator to act as an intervalometer for my G12, and it worked beautifully. Not sure the cable/jack is the same as for the 70D...maybe I should take a look! :)

4
In my opinion, Canon should include touch capability on all future camera LCDs -- with a menu option to disable touch functionality. Then everyone can use it or not use it as they prefer.

I love the articulating screen. Had one on an A80, G12 and now 70D, and I can't imagine life without it. In fact, if/when I move to full frame, that will be what I miss most (unless -- crossing fingers -- Canon introduces a full frame body with articulating touch screen). If I was a pro that was hard on my gear, I might choose a fixed display for durability.

The articulating screens on all three of my cameras work like the day they were new, despite some pretty hard use (elk hunting in icy temps, snowboarding in even icier temps -- even dropped in the snow a few times, desert sand dunes with fine sand getting in every crevice, etc.). It would not surprise me if they were durable enough for hard pro use. If not, I don't think it would take much for Canon to "ruggedize" them.

Anyway, I'd want a durable articulating touch screen on any future body I own...


5
EOS-M / Re: The promised pics of the 18-200 Tammy
« on: July 15, 2014, 11:19:24 AM »
The PEZ dispenser. Somehow the feet of those dispensers are made to fit a hot shoe and you do not need to ask for smiles once you have mounted it.

Cool! I'm going to have to try this!

6
EOS-M / Re: The promised pics of the 18-200 Tammy
« on: July 15, 2014, 01:15:39 AM »
What LR is actually doing, is to remove the exact purple shade of the color from the image.  This usually is not noticible, because its a very narrow filter.  But if there is something that exact shade of purple in the image, it will no longer have any color.

And if that is ever a problem, you can use a local adjustment brush to remove the fringing from just the places it appears. I use this option occasionally and have had great success with it. Hope this helps...

By the way, Lightroom is, in my opinion, worth every penny.

7
Oh, one other thing: Bring plenty of spare (charged!) batteries for both cameras and flashes. Also bring all the memory cards you have, and if possible, a laptop to dump them to, if necessary.

Few things hamper an otherwise good shoot like running out of juice or storage space!

8
I just did the same thing for my brother and his family. Unfortunately, I only have a 70D, EF-S 17-55 F2.8 IS and 430EXII, but it still turned out well. They were so pleased that they insisted on paying me about the same as the pros they were shopping around for.

One thing that made a HUGE difference: reflectors, and someone to hold/aim them.

I had a couple of Westcott 5-In-1 40" reflectors (about $40 each), and they were invaluable. Being able to bounce fill light back to the face in an otherwise back-lit scenario made for nice soft light in the front and natural hair light from the back. Of course, this works best for the individual shots. These reflectors are too small to be effective for the full group, but I was able to find a good location with great natural light. There was one location that had some harsh sun, but I just pulled the sleeve off a reflector and used the diffuser with great success.

Another thing that helped: A beautiful location with a lot of open shade.

In my case, it was a well landscaped city park with huge cottonwood trees and a stone amphitheater. The shade was enough to keep the light soft, but not so much that I had to crank up the ISO. I was on 400 ISO the whole evening. The stone amphitheater also made perfect tiered seating for some of the family shots.

If I were you, I'd put the 24-70L on the 6D and the 15-85 on the 70D. I'd bring a good tripod, reflectors/diffusers and a flash or two if you have them.

Finally, bring a happy attitude and your best compliments, and distribute them liberally while shooting. Sincere, specific compliments will help keep your subjects fresh and feeling good. Showing some of the better shots on the back of the camera now and then throughout the shoot will help, too.

Anyway, good luck, and enjoy!

9
One other thing to mention, the larger the sensor, the fewer sensors yielded per silicon wafer. This, and the increased waste (wafers are round, so the larger the sensor, the larger the wasted fragments on the edges) translates into much higher cost for sensor production.

Someone feel free to correct me if I'm mistaken on this...

10
Here some examples of mine...

Forceflow, this series is just brilliant! The burning wick? Spectacular. A perfect example of what makes macro photography so captivating -- seeing detail in things one has seen a million times but had no idea how it really looks...

11
Macro / Re: first attempt at stacking macro shots :: )
« on: July 10, 2014, 11:50:01 PM »
Quote
I know one photographer who puts his insects in the fridge just long enough for their metabolism to slow down to a point where they are almost asleep - and then shoots them.

Then you should kick them squarely in the nuts and give their macro lens to a charity shop. It is extremely poor practice to harm your subject in this way. it amounts to nothing more than animal cruelty.

Hard to believe one's respect for life is genuine when it stops short of humans.   ???

Am I missing something here? Does putting an insect in the refrigerator to slow its metabolism slightly do some harm to the insect or are we just anthropomorphizing here? Because I've frequently heard about this technique and understood it to be quite common.

I personally don't see anything wrong with the technique. Just thought it was odd to condemn chilling a fly for a few minutes, then turn around and advocate violence on a person.  :o

12
Macro / Re: first attempt at stacking macro shots :: )
« on: July 10, 2014, 09:05:55 PM »
Off Topic:

Then you should kick them squarely in the nuts and give their macro lens to a charity shop. It is extremely poor practice to harm your subject in this way. it amounts to nothing more than animal cruelty.

Hard to believe one's respect for life is genuine when it stops short of humans.   ???

On Topic:


These "beginner" shots are simply amazing. Makes me want to pick up a macro lens and take a stab at it myself.

By the way, I didn't know LR/Enfuse could do focus stacking (never thought about it as I use it strictly for blending exposures). I'll have to check it out...

13
Landscape / Re: What is your review?
« on: July 03, 2014, 07:08:39 PM »
A few thoughts to add to the already good advice you've received so far:

Composition

The effect of strong horizontal lines (especially the dark band of land between water and sky) and a more-or-less centered subject (I'm assuming the flowers are the subject) tends to lead to a fairly flat feeling image -- not much in the image gives a feeling of depth or draws me in. This is where leading lines can help.

Experiment with shots from various angles to see if something in the environment can be incorporated into the framing to draw the eye in toward the flowers. If there was a fence, railing or sidewalk near the flowers in your example, you could compose the image in such a way that the fence forms a diagonal line that brings the eye from the edge of the frame toward the flowers. In cases where the surroundings are boring or distracting, a very tight framing might be more appropriate (i.e. fill the frame with your subject).

One other thought on composition: your subject falls off the bottom of the frame a bit. In this particular composition, it leads to a feeling of ambiguity (are the flowers really the subject?).

Content

It can be helpful to avoid including anything in the image that doesn't specifically contribute to the message or composition you're trying to convey or produce.

For example, I took some portraits of a young girl dressed up in her fancy cowgirl duds (she shows horses). The portraits turned out very well, but there were some stains on the wall behind her, so I cloned them out in Lightroom.

In another example, an environmental family portrait I was shooting was on a beautiful grassy slope under some massive cottonwood trees. The framing was just right, but in post, I cloned-out all the little twigs and leaves that were scattered around the grass.

These are small things that few would notice specifically if they saw the original, but snapping back and forth between original and retouched, it becomes obvious how distracting little things can be and how much stronger of an image it is without them.

Eliminating anything (either in composition or in post-processing) that's not relevant to the message or context will add to the strength of the image.

In the example you provided, there are a couple of things I'd have excluded (either in composition, if possible, or in post). The first is in the bottom-left corner. That little patch of muted color from other flowers is a little distracting. I'd clone it out. If it was a field of flowers and other flowers add to the context or feel, they'd stay. In this image, they take away from the flowers the viewer should be paying attention to.

Another thing to consider is the palm fronds in the upper left corner. It can be nice to use things like that to "frame" your subject, but there's nothing on the right side to balance it (all the more necessary when the subject is centered). The lower frond looks a bit dead and breaks the horizon line as it arcs toward the flowers, so I'd clone it out.

Anyway, you probably get the idea -- simplify or remove anything that doesn't strengthen the presentation of the subject.

Lighting

It's been mentioned that the exposure could be boosted a bit. Once you start shooting in RAW and use a good program to process them (I really like Lightroom), you can manipulate the light to very gently draw the eye to your subject. This can be done by adding a subtle vignette and/or using a local adjustment to boost the exposure of just the subject. Vignettes are a matter of taste, and for me, if it's immediately noticeable that a vignette has been applied, then it takes away from the image. The trick is to apply just enough that the eye naturally moves to the brighter part of the image (the subject). Incidentally, this effect also contributes to a feeling of depth.

So there you go -- three concepts to consider the next time you're shooting (or processing) your photos. There are all kinds of other things to add, but that would be too much. I'd recommend taking a look at Mike Browne's YouTube channel. He has dozens of well-presented, easy to understand tutorials that cover most of the topics of composition, lighting and technique you'd need to get going strong.

Here's a link: https://www.youtube.com/user/photoexposed/videos

Hopefully this information is helpful! Enjoy your gear and learning how to get the most out of it -- it's a near-endless learning experience. Most of all, enjoy the images you capture.

Take care...

14
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon Pixma Pro-100 $34 at Adorama
« on: July 02, 2014, 10:03:44 PM »
Maybe someone in the shipping department really wanted the rebate and swiped the box.  :o

15
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon Pixma Pro-100 $34 at Adorama
« on: July 02, 2014, 09:59:31 PM »
Mine is scheduled for delivery a week from tomorrow (bought it Monday and chose the free shipping option). Here's hoping I get a factory sealed Canon box with UPC!

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