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Messages - East Wind Photography

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16
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 11, 2015, 04:23:12 PM »
Seems that no matter what I do with DSS and the post in PS, this is the best I can get.  By the time I work through the repetative curve process, the background ends up looking like 16 shades of grey.  I know there is nice data here to be had but it's not coming out with the old school tools.

So I just submitted my trial license for pixinsight before I get too discouraged and give up.

17
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 11, 2015, 12:15:46 PM »
Pixinsight offers a 45 day trial version.  I can't think of a better time to try it out and see if it helps.  Though it may take 45 days just to learn how to use it.

Downside is in 45 days you have to cough up 230 euros!

18
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 10, 2015, 11:22:51 PM »
Just brutal...110 subs of lovejoy tonight with the 600 and 5d3.  Didn't realize it was 18 degrees F outside.  Good news is that the sensor stayed at 19C the entire time.

I ended up using ISO 1600 and 20 sec shots at f 5.6.  Running them now to see how many have a decent score.

This will be the last op for a while as a front is coming in tomorrow.  Next window will be Friday or Saturday night.

19
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 10, 2015, 04:45:15 PM »
I see you even picked up a galaxy there on the right.

20
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 10, 2015, 04:12:05 PM »
Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2


I don't get to do comets often. They aren't in the sky that much, and even when they are, they are often low to the horizon during sunrise. Terry Lovejoy, comet-finder extraordinaire, discovered another comet in August 2014. It finally drifted into the northern horizon skies on December 24th, and I've been wanting to get some comet photons ever since. Finally got a chance last night:





In my haste to get some data before the moon came up, I ended up underexposing my subs. That resulted in the heavy banding of the 5D III showing through. I managed to eliminate most of it, but some is still visible in the coma. This was my first tracked comet image, and I managed to get some detail on the tail, which I'm fairly happy about. Hoping I get another opportunity to image this again, and get some better data.

Really nice.  And very nice you have dark skies!  I'm going to try the 600 tonight but I'm not expecting much.  What was your integration to get this?

21
EOS-M / Re: Why do I keep my Eos M?
« on: January 09, 2015, 10:43:31 PM »
@ East Wind ( and others):

Does Magic Lantern with its focus system improve the AF time and/or the lag time?

@ Distant.star:

I've been looking at the Fuji X system and wondering if that would be a "better" system for me even though I'd need a set of lenses with the X-mount?

@ Cory:

You might want to look at the Joby Gorilla-pod series for light and small that could go nicely with a small mirrorless setup.  I've used the SLR-Zoom with the Ballhead-x to support my 5Diii and a 70-200 f/4 and that is much smaller and lighter than my Redged  tripod.  So an even smaller Gorilla-pod should work for you.

All:

Appreciate your comments sofar.....

No it does not improve the lag or AF speed. just adds additional capabilities.

22
EOS-M / Re: Why do I keep my Eos M?
« on: January 09, 2015, 04:44:36 PM »
A pocket camera that runs Magic Lantern that I carry everywhere.  What more can I say.

Dual ISO (single shot HDR)
Time lapse video
Intervalometer
Automatic focus stacking
Raw video when I need it
And lastly accepts all of my EF lenses in a pinch


23
Photography Technique / Re: How to Expose and get sharp Focus of Moon
« on: January 08, 2015, 07:04:00 AM »
MAny good tips here which I think you have tried and found great results.  After you master good focus and reduced image shake, you can also use your camera histogram to help as well.  Expose the image so that the moon is on the right side of the histogram.  4th or 5th division but not all the way to the edge.  In live view it will look overexposed but that's ok.  You can pull it down in Photoshop, DPP or other image editing tool.

There are a couple of reasons for doing this.  The first is that pulling down the exposure will greatly assist in reducing noise.  Even at ISO 100 there is noise and this allows you to reduce it even further.  It's a good method to use even taking other normal photographs.  It Allows you to apply more sharpness to compensate for atmospheric loss.  The other reason is a DSLR records more shades of grey or color at the bright end of the histogram.  Lots of math goes into explaining that but you can use that to your favor to record the subtle variations in surface brightness better.

Also as you found out ISO 100 is generally the best when you are trying to record highlight detail.  Higher ISO is used to record better shadow detail.  The higher the ISO used the less highlight detail your camera will record.  For the moon use ISO 100 as its all highlight.


24
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 07, 2015, 11:14:23 PM »
So my stacks are coming out better.  However I believe I possibly overexposed too much with the moon interfering.  After I stack the tail gets lost more into the background.  As if the stacking is also increasing the background glow.  I used a stack of 6 from the day before and got a good tail but the noise is bad. 

Trying to get a stack of 30 Going now...but not sure of the moon glow.

25
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 07, 2015, 09:14:36 PM »
Most of the references to lens profile correction are done in-camera. For example, Roger Clark uses the built-in camera dark subtraction and lens corrections to avoid having to calibrate his subs. That is effective, to a degree. It does not produce the best results. In-camera processing power is limited, so the algorithms are lower precision. In-camera processing isn't going to use the more advanced algorithms we have today to optimally calibrate your light frames either. Plus, single-frame dark subtraction can fix hot pixels, but it tends to increase random noise.


I still recommend generating and using a proper flat, and either dithering or using a proper master dark, for calibration. None of the astro integration tools support lens profiles or anything like that. So if you didn't take the frames with in-camera calibration on, then you can't do it after the fact.

I thought the in camera lens correction was only applied to jpg.  So you are saying it applies to RAW as well?

26
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 07, 2015, 07:12:29 PM »
Jon I have a question.  I've seen some references of using lens profile correction and aberration correction prior to stacking.  Does DSS read DPP or ACR sidecar files?  I got to thinking about that and didn't see how that might work if we were using CR2 files as subs and not JPG.  Any insight there?

I think I discovered where I was going wrong on the editing.  My display adapter was not set up optimally and therefore my visual representation was being crippled.  Never noticed it before but never had to stretch something as severe as this.  Will give it another try tonight.


27
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 06, 2015, 11:40:30 PM »
ok let me see what I can do.  Too late tonight to start re-integrating.  Will try tomorrow and see if I can get you something a bit more manageable.

28
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 06, 2015, 11:37:22 PM »
Nice comet, East Wind! I haven't had the opportunity to image that yet (weather :'( ).


How are you stacking? There are some specific techniques to stack the comet separate from the stars, stack the stars separate from the comet, then combine the two. DSS can actually do it for you, it's decent. PixInsight has comet stacking capabilities as well...more manual, more complex, but the results can be amazing.


I would download DSS (DeepSkyStacker, free) and try that first.


@dcm: Hubble stuff puts most ground-based astrophotographer's work to shame. Having no atmosphere to contend with is a HUGE bonus for Hubble...it can resolve an incredible amount of detail. Seeing is the bane of all earth-bound imagers, although with cameras like the A7s, which is so incredibly sensitive, we may be able to employ lucky imaging techniques to solve that problem within the next few years. Lucky imaging (high speed imaging, allowing you to take tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of frames, then discard any that aren't near-perfect, integrating only the best ones), combined with adaptive/active optics, is how the new Thirty-meter and Forty-meter telescopes from ESO will resolve more detail than Hubble (by a lot.) There are some adaptive optics options for ground-based imagers...their effectiveness has never been fully verified...but combined with lucky imaging, ground-based imagers with 16-32" scopes could produce some amazing results, for sure.

Yeah I have been working with DSS.  Got a nice stack.  background is bright due to the moon that night.  The issue is in processing using photoshop and trying to stretch the tail out of the background.  When I get done with the editing it looks like about 8 shades of grey and I give up to try again another time.  I'm certainly obviously missing something.


You want me to give processing the data a try?

Its a lot of data.  need to figure out where to stash it for you.  The TIFFs from DSS about about 236MB each.


How many files are you getting from DSS? If you use comet stacking, you should have just one...

Yeah after stacking it's 236MB.  I have a couple of different stacks.  One without a filter, one with a deep sky filter, and a 3rd taken the day prior but I only have maybe 12 subs but it has less moon.  Got started too late.

Is it possible to attach large files to CR messages?

29
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 06, 2015, 11:27:04 PM »
Nice comet, East Wind! I haven't had the opportunity to image that yet (weather :'( ).


How are you stacking? There are some specific techniques to stack the comet separate from the stars, stack the stars separate from the comet, then combine the two. DSS can actually do it for you, it's decent. PixInsight has comet stacking capabilities as well...more manual, more complex, but the results can be amazing.


I would download DSS (DeepSkyStacker, free) and try that first.


@dcm: Hubble stuff puts most ground-based astrophotographer's work to shame. Having no atmosphere to contend with is a HUGE bonus for Hubble...it can resolve an incredible amount of detail. Seeing is the bane of all earth-bound imagers, although with cameras like the A7s, which is so incredibly sensitive, we may be able to employ lucky imaging techniques to solve that problem within the next few years. Lucky imaging (high speed imaging, allowing you to take tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of frames, then discard any that aren't near-perfect, integrating only the best ones), combined with adaptive/active optics, is how the new Thirty-meter and Forty-meter telescopes from ESO will resolve more detail than Hubble (by a lot.) There are some adaptive optics options for ground-based imagers...their effectiveness has never been fully verified...but combined with lucky imaging, ground-based imagers with 16-32" scopes could produce some amazing results, for sure.

Yeah I have been working with DSS.  Got a nice stack.  background is bright due to the moon that night.  The issue is in processing using photoshop and trying to stretch the tail out of the background.  When I get done with the editing it looks like about 8 shades of grey and I give up to try again another time.  I'm certainly obviously missing something.


You want me to give processing the data a try?

Its a lot of data.  need to figure out where to stash it for you.  The TIFFs from DSS about about 236MB each.

30
Landscape / Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« on: January 06, 2015, 11:23:43 PM »
I also picked up a used 52mm drop in gelatin filter holder for 69 bucks.  Condition was too good so paid a bit of a premium.  I'll toss the glass and insert my new filter.  Best deals are finding one with a scratch or crack in the glass.  :) 

I had been wanting to pick up a lumicon comet filter for a while to pull out the C2 lines whenever they may show up.  Was able to get it for 25% off.  Aside from that it seems to be very good in the OxIII range  98% transmission so maybe some hope there for other things.


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