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Messages - digital paradise

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91
Technical Support / Re: Aperture/Shutter speed/ISO
« on: March 18, 2013, 02:01:35 AM »
Each to his own but I think that is border lien. I was maxed out on my 7D. Night game, F4 lens and at 12,800 I could only get to 1/500. Hands and feet have motion blur. I wish I could have prevented this with a higher speed. You can create prop blur on a plane at 1/320.   



This is where technology comes in to help.  A lens that goes f/2.8 lowers your ISO automatically from 12,800 to 6400.  And if you have yet a camera that handles super high ISO's, 6400 is easy and now you have a very clean photo.  You could then raise shutter back up to 1/800 and shoot at ISO 10,000 and still have very acceptable files.  This is an extreme example, however.  Looking at your file, though, I think you did very well.

I did not have a 2.8 lens telephoto at the time or I would have used it. Used my 300 F4 IS. The term fast lens really hit home that night. I just picked up the new 70-200 2.8

92
Technical Support / Re: Aperture/Shutter speed/ISO
« on: March 17, 2013, 09:09:46 PM »
Each to his own but I think that is border lien. I was maxed out on my 7D. Night game, F4 lens and at 12,800 I could only get to 1/500. Hands and feet have motion blur. I wish I could have prevented this with a higher speed. You can create prop blur on a plane at 1/320.   


93
Technical Support / Re: Aperture/Shutter speed/ISO
« on: March 17, 2013, 07:08:13 PM »
Forgot. Every time you make the shutter faster, close down the aperture (16 to 1.4) or both you let less light getting in to the sensor. Reversed when you slow the shutter down or open the aperture. Need to pay attention to the light meter. If you can't get it in the centre for what you want to increase or decrease the ISO.         

94
Technical Support / Re: Aperture/Shutter speed/ISO
« on: March 17, 2013, 07:03:01 PM »
First you typically want the lowest ISO for your application. Second you need the fastest shutter speed to be able to avoid camera shake and freeze you subject. Sports you want a fast shutter. 1/1000 or better. Someone sitting 1/60 will do. Rule of thumb for avoiding camera shake is shutter should be be one stop faster than the focal length. 50mm = 1/60. 300mm = 1/320. YOu can lower that a bit if your lens has IS. I usually always go much higher. Better for me.

Next is DOF which you control via the aperture. Shallow or deep. Shallow means a persons face is in focus and everything is out of focus. Deep means everything in the image is in focus. Shallow = 1.4. Deep = 16. Here is where you are creative. Not to say you can't be creative with shutter speeds. You may want motion blur.

DOF calculator. Distance to subject is very important when you are shooting shallow.   

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

I will always sacrifice ISO and aperture if I want to freeze my subject. I can fix noise from high ISO and I can live with a blurred background if my subject is in focus if I need to open up the aperture to maintain shutter a fast speed. You can not fix a blurry, OOF image.

Everything above is a slave to exposure. You have to keep the camera's light meter in the middle - for starters. Later you need to learn how your camera meter works. How to expose for back lit subjects, how to expose for pure black or pure white subjects. Those are extremes but you need to know that. A 50% black and 50% white subject will expose properly when the meter is in the middle.                               

Play with this for a while and you will start to get the hang of it. 

http://camerasim.com/camera-simulator/

95
Canon General / Re: Why did you choose Canon?
« on: March 14, 2013, 10:49:47 PM »
I was told by a camera jet eye  to stay a way from the dark side

Good one!!! Thanks for the laugh. Gonna add that one to my set.   

96
Canon General / Re: Why did you choose Canon?
« on: March 13, 2013, 10:57:09 PM »
20D was the cream of the crop when I went digital. Nikon was still using the inferior CCD sensor. 

97
Software & Accessories / Re: Help on interpreting FoCal results
« on: March 13, 2013, 10:54:39 PM »
If your gear is under warranty then you will not be charged for adjustments.

98
No problem. This was my mission. The OP asked how to use NR correctly so that was what I demonstrated. I did not use ACR NR when I had CS5 so I can't compare but I believe you. 3rd party might slightly be better but not at the level you are looking for, I don't think anyway. Hopefully what you are seeking will come out.       

99
That is the whole thing. LR/ACR NR is excellent. You might be able to a difference that the pixel level but at the end of the day will another person notice the difference. I have not touched either NIK Dfine or Topaz in a year. Workflow is so much easier working with Adobe products.     

100
For me, overall, I prefer the 24-105L for portrait work, but for more general purpose work, the 24-70L II is probably the better lens, over all.

Not sure whether to be frustrated or grateful after reading this.  ;)  I'm getting the 24-70 II, and had planned to sell my 24-105 this week.  But you've got a great point - the flexibility to go from wide to a headshot is very useful.  I'd not use it outdoors (where I prefer fast primes to blur the background), but rather indoors with a backdrop and monolight+Speedlites in softboxes.  In that situation, I'm stopped down a bit because I've got plenty of light and no need for background blur, and as you say, perfect sharpness isn't usually necessary or even desirable. 

If nothing else, I suppose I should hang onto the 24-105 for a while.

(By the way, I'm grateful - thanks!)

I would have kept my 24-105 if I had not needed funding for the new lens. Actually I did a lot of upgrades last fall.   

101
I had the 24-105 for about 5 years. Just sold it for the 24-70 II. The 24-105 did me well but it IMO was it was pretty bad @ 24 on a FF. Lots of distortion and soft corners. You can fix barrel distortion but people on the outsides still looked like they weighed an additional 30 lbs.

I had been looking for a landscape lens for years for my FF for years. Used a Tokina 11-16 on my crop in the meantime. I rented the 24 TSE II and Zeiss 21. Both excellent but one was a specialty lens, the other a little costly for the the features. I'm glad I held out. The 24-70 II is not perfect but it is pretty good. Has some barrel dist and vignetting but corner to corner a very decent lens. Sold my Tokina and now I have a versatile workhorse. I'm upset it did not come with IS but have found I'm not really missing it. Still would have liked it for the price.

24mm 2.8



You might want to check this out. Sample shots get better after several posts.

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1225646

I posted some shots on Post #308   

102
Canon General / Re: your scariest photography moment?
« on: March 11, 2013, 01:38:06 AM »
Every time I talk to my wife about purchasing new equipment.

+1 lol

Mine is whenever my wife logs into our amazon account after I've ordered a new lens.  Tomorrow should be fun... Just ordered the 135mm f/2L yesterday.  :-)

Good luck!

103
Canon General / Re: your scariest photography moment?
« on: March 11, 2013, 01:04:17 AM »
Every time I talk to my wife about purchasing new equipment. 

104
NIK will. Not sure about the other.

105
Same process applies when using DPP. I stopped using 3rd party NR software because it just slowed down my workflow. Using Lr or ACR I can just adjust one image the way I like and just sync the rest or in DPP's case use the recipe. Careful when using DPP recipes as it will make across the board changes if you make any other changes to the original image. Using Lr/ACR you can select which adjustment or adjustments you want to sync.

Oh yeah. Do NR adjustments at 100% like in the sample images.         

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