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Messages - bholliman

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16
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS M Vanishes from Canon USA Web Site
« on: June 01, 2014, 01:15:36 PM »
Quote
As camera phones improve these high end APS-C systems will eventually disappear.

???

I guess it should read "high-priced APS-C systems will eventually disappear" ... and that's exactly my opinion too.

Once we get beyond 135mm focal length, lenses for any sensor-size from mFT via APS-C to FF are exactly the same size: "FF size". And below that focal length, lens size and weight does not scale anywhere proporationately to image circle. There's just no point in buying 1000+ € 56mm/1.2 lenses ... unless they cover 36x24mm image circle.  :-)

Yes, I meant high priced.  If somebody can make a "high end" low priced APS-C system it will certainly be viable.

I'm not saying APS-C will go away, I'm saying APS-C systems that cost as much as better FF systems can't compete and will eventually decline quite a bit in sales.  I suppose there will still be a small market for users who care so much about compact size with lots of features, they are willing to pay a big premium for it.

17
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS M Vanishes from Canon USA Web Site
« on: June 01, 2014, 06:34:29 AM »
Rather good Ff cameras can be had at decent prices (6D, D610, A7) .. And they can be really compact too (A7/R/S). Prices will fall further, functionality will further increase.

Fuji X systems and mFT cameras will not be sucessful in price bands of 1000+ for every camera and every other lens .. As soon as the hype is over and as soon as compact ff mirrorless cameras plus matching lenses can be had at decent prices, people wil buy those rather than half- and quartet-sized sensors.

+1  the Fuji APS-C and mFT systems are very nice, but can't survive much longer at their current price points.  As AvTvM pointed out, there are good FF system alternatives in the same price range.  APS-C's main advantages over FF are size and system price at the expense of some IQ.  The APS-C size advantage is legitimate (even compact FF bodies will require large glass once you move beyond maybe 85mm) but price advantage does not exist with $1,200 bodies and $1k lenses. 

 As camera phones improve these high end APS-C systems will eventually disappear.

18
If your wife is getting more serious about wedding and portraiture photography then the 6D is the better choice.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but serious wedding and 6d/5d2 af system doesn't square. You can use it as a 2nd or backup body, but for anything mission-critical that moves this is not the camera you can rely upon. Think of the couple walking down the church alley, your af tracking fails and you have to say "Well, you know, I saved $1000, could you please repeat it?".

There are plenty of excellent wedding photographers using the 6D as their primary camera.  Dustin Abbott, who often posts here is one.  A local photographer, well regarded as the best in the town I live, uses a 6D as primary and 5D2 for his second shooter and doesn't have any AF issues with these bodies.

I'll be the first to admit the 6D's AF is not nearly as good as the 5D3 or 1Dx, but it's not bad either.  Unless you are shooting lots of sports or fast paced wildlife (BIF), the 6D's AF is probably good enough for most uses including weddings.

No offense but I own the 6D, 5D3 and 60D (not to mention many other Canon bodies) and I am fully confident in the 6D autofocus.  In fact, until a firmware update fixed the 5D3 low light AF issues, the 6D stomped it with low light AF.  Don't run away from the 6D because some folks think it has flaws compared to the 5D3.

As for the OP question about 'best all-around body', I also would tend to agree with candc, the 70D is likely the best all around for your needs.  Better video, speed for sports, etc.  A FF sensor (6D) will open up a whole world of creativity but you can still create great images with an APS-C camera and that's the format you are already accustomed to anyway.  Get a 6D ASAP later but get the 70D first and get busy making money to pay for other things.  Buy most of your lenses in EF type so you can use them on the FF camera in the future.

I think we are generally in agreement.  Maybe my wording came across more negative about the 6D's AF than I intended?  I own a 6D and have borrowed or rented 5D3 's and a 70D with enough use I think I understand each bodies strengths and limitations.

For most photography not involving fast moving sports or BIF the 6D's AF is good to very good, excellent AF accuracy and precision.  Certainly a good option for weddings and events as well as landscapes, portraits and street shooting.  The 6D's AF does struggle in AI Servo when compared with the 5D3 and to some degree the 70D in my opinion, partially due to the limited number of AF points.  But, AI Servo is a very small percentage of what I shoot, so the 6D is a terrific body for my use.

I agree that the 70D would be the best "all around" photo/video body to upgrade from a Rebel for the OP's stated purposes.

19
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS M Vanishes from Canon USA Web Site
« on: May 27, 2014, 12:35:23 PM »
This may or may not be the end of the EOS-M line for Canon USA, time will tell.  Personally, I think its a great little complementary camera system, but Canon probably is losing money on every sale under $400.

I'm hoping Canon does continue to develop the M or another line of a really compact camera's with APS-C sensors.  Whether the future design is mirrorless or a small DSLR similar to the SL1, I don't really care.  I think there is a market for a small camera system that is compatible with Canon EF and EF-S lenses.
 

20
Canon General / Canon warranty transferable?
« on: May 23, 2014, 09:26:32 AM »
I recently purchased a speedlite bundle from Adorama and plan to sell one or two of the new 600EX-RT's.  This will be the first time I've sold any new Canon equipment or even less than a year old.

Is the Canon warranty still valid for whoever buys the 600EX-RT's?  If so, I assume I will need to send the buyer a copy of my invoice.

Thanks

21
Lenses / Re: Lens choice for airshows
« on: May 21, 2014, 08:13:42 AM »
I think the Tamron 150-600 would be an excellent airshow lens.  Probably the best available option for less than $6K.  I ordered one from B&H several weeks ago am an still waiting.  I'm hoping it will arrive before our vacation to Alaska in mid June.


I had my eye on the Tamron but Tony Northrup reviewed it and the 500-600mm shots he posted were very poor - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fmMG5jgDwk


I've read or watched most of the on-line reviews of the Tamron 150-600 and Tony Northrup's review is the only one that is mostly negative in regards to sharpness.  Maybe he received a poor copy of the lens?

22
Reviews / Re: 35/2 IS Review by Dustin Abbott
« on: May 19, 2014, 08:34:55 AM »
Just bought the original lens hood Canon EW-72
The attachement to lens is not so good at all. Both front and reversed attached to the lens.
A slight bump againt the hood and already it gets loose.
Anyone else with this experience?

No problems with my EW-72, feels solid.  You might have received a defective hood.

23
If your wife is getting more serious about wedding and portraiture photography then the 6D is the better choice.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but serious wedding and 6d/5d2 af system doesn't square. You can use it as a 2nd or backup body, but for anything mission-critical that moves this is not the camera you can rely upon. Think of the couple walking down the church alley, your af tracking fails and you have to say "Well, you know, I saved $1000, could you please repeat it?".

There are plenty of excellent wedding photographers using the 6D as their primary camera.  Dustin Abbott, who often posts here is one.  A local photographer, well regarded as the best in the town I live, uses a 6D as primary and 5D2 for his second shooter and doesn't have any AF issues with these bodies.

I'll be the first to admit the 6D's AF is not nearly as good as the 5D3 or 1Dx, but it's not bad either.  Unless you are shooting lots of sports or fast paced wildlife (BIF), the 6D's AF is probably good enough for most uses including weddings.

24
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Advice on a upgrade from the Rebel XS
« on: May 13, 2014, 06:39:52 AM »

Try borrowing or renting a 6D and a 70D (Pass on the 7D, its not very good in low light).  Try them both a ISO 25600.
 
The bottom line is that you pay a lot of $$ for a incremental improvement in the APS-C line, which is why jumping to a 6D may be attractive for low light use, and almost everything else.

+1  As a 6D owner and father of an active 2-year-old, I strongly recommend it.  I purchased a 6D last year and almost never used my 7D after that, and eventually sold it.  The 6D produces very nice images at ISO 3200 and even 6400.  I prefer flash photography when it's an option, but there are places it's not allowed or would be disruptive.  For example if you want to get some candid shots of kids interacting, you really don't want to distract them with flash.

Regarding the 6D's AF and frame rate for moving kids or other things moving, I find it to be good enough.  We recently attended a birthday party with lots of under 5 kids and I was pleased with the number of good, in-focus shots I came home with.  I'm sure a 5D3 or 1Dx would have captured more good shots (higher FPS, better AF), but personally I can't justify the difference in price.  I feel like my current equipment exceeds my skill as a photographer anyway.

25
The MTF's do look very good!  I'm also pleasantly surprised by the initial pricing, after reading the introduction I was guessing $1,600 and $350.  For a landscape photographer they look like terrific options.  I'll be waiting for the hands-on reviews, but the 16-35 immediately goes on my list of most wanted lenses.

26
I agree with those recommending the Samyang/Rokinon 14mm 2.8 UMC.  Excellent lens for minimal investment.  Of course your 17mm TS/E is an incredible lens, hard to beat it for UWA landscape.

Which Utah park(s) are you going to?  Bryce is my favorite, but Arches, Zion and Canyonlands are awesome as well.

27
Lenses / Re: 135L v 85 1.8
« on: May 01, 2014, 05:11:53 AM »
I own both the 85 1.8 and 135 2.0 for use on my 6D.  The 135L is my most used portrait lens, but the 85 gets a fair amount of use as well.  The 135 is definitely a better lens: sharper, smoother bokeh and CA well controlled (also 3x more expensive).  But, the 85 1.8 is a nice lens as well.  I find the 135mm focal length often too long for indoor shooting while 85mm generally works well.  The 85 is relatively sharp, small and light.  The CA can generally be corrected in Lightroom.

If I had to choose between the two lenses, the 135 would win hands down, but I would not want to part with my 85 1.8 either.  If Canon does come out with an updated version of the 85 1.8 with IS (rumored for what that's worth), I would be one of the first people in line to buy one, as I love the 85mm focal length. 

28
Lenses / Re: EF 400L f/5.6 vs. Tamron 150-600
« on: April 30, 2014, 05:36:46 AM »
Thanks for the input and excellent sample pictures, I'm sold on the Tammy.  I plan to order one in the next few days so I have time to get familiar with it and perform AFMA before my trip north.

I placed an order for it on 4/1 from BH so I'd have plenty of time before a July trip - haven't heard anything yet.   Status is still "On Order".  I wonder what the current lead time is.

there is a quite a backlog for them as they are super popular

I ordered last night from B&H, but am nervous about delivery now.  We leave for AK in 6 weeks.

29
Lenses / Re: EF 400L f/5.6 vs. Tamron 150-600
« on: April 29, 2014, 04:20:26 PM »
Thanks for the input and excellent sample pictures, I'm sold on the Tammy.  I plan to order one in the next few days so I have time to get familiar with it and perform AFMA before my trip north.

30
Lenses / Re: EF 400L f/5.6 vs. Tamron 150-600
« on: April 27, 2014, 07:23:14 AM »
You see the differences in resolving power when you are looking at fine detail that is close to the limits of resolution of a lens. Here is a collage of shots of the centre of an iso 12233 chart (not a professional chart from a high quality printer but a standard laser print posted on the wall of my house in daylight). The results are pretty clear: at 400mm, the Tammy, which as as sharp as the 100-400 and close to the 400L, can't resolve fully the fine line circles; at 500mm it can; and 600mm it is definitely slightly better. For comparison, a 300mm f/2.8 II + 2xTC III wins at f/5.6.

Thanks for the real world examples, the bokeh is definitely smoother in the 600mm shot of the goose and some details look sharper.  The ISO 12233 charts provide an excellent comparison of fine detail resolution between 400 and 600mm.  The Tammy looks pretty decent at 600mm f/8.

The added reach of the Tammy along with its flexibility and image stabilization are making me lean in that direction over the 400L.  I'm thinking I should order the Tammy soon to make sure I have it prior to our Alaska trip.  I understand it's not readily available yet.  Thanks again!

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