April 19, 2014, 09:48:48 PM

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Messages - RickSpringfield

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1
Canon General / Re: In need of a "walk around" camera
« on: March 06, 2014, 09:46:45 PM »
My vote is a 7D with a 24-105. You get the durability you need and a comfortable range + a familiar feel and high FPS when needed. The IQ is there provided your not shooting 50% of the time in a dark bar. Put a rapid strap on it and go sans case.

2
Lenses / Re: Confusing info on Lens Compression
« on: February 09, 2014, 01:46:10 PM »
Dear Rick
Here is the Video for Lens Compression.
Enjoy
Surapon

Cool vid and the barn size isn't something I have seen before, but it's confusing a bit tough to understand what's happening there. 

So I have a long lens, I crank it out to 70 and inside the lens it sees a foreground object at 1 foot tall when I am standing 10 feet away. And it sees an object 100 feet away (barn) as 30 foot tall.  Then I crank it out to 200mm and I back up to 15 feet away and it sees the foreground object as 1 foot tall.  But then it sees the object that is 100 feet away (barn) as 60 foot tall? 

Then somewhere along the line there is a DoF loss when comparing the 1.6x to a FF to think about as well. So I'll never really get F4 DoF out of that lens because I don't have a FF.


3
Lenses / Re: Confusing info on Lens Compression
« on: February 09, 2014, 01:15:24 PM »
However subject isolation is also a result of magnification as well as distance, so the 5D at 168mm would appear to have a shallower dof for a given same aperture.

Great point!  Is there a math way to figure this out including DoF equivalent?  Is the 7D 105 F4 DoF the same as the 5D3 168 F5.6?

4
Lenses / Confusing info on Lens Compression
« on: February 09, 2014, 12:23:28 PM »
I've been reading up on lens compression, distance, and perspective. It's difficult to understand how all of these things relate to begin with but on top of that I have a crop body which I don't see much info about.

Take for instance a 24-105 on a 7D. Is that the same lens compression and relatively flattering look as a 70-200 dialed out on a 5D3?  Is the distance about the same in terms of X feet from subject to get the same framing?

I'm probably just over thinking this but it's crazy confusing.

5
Lenses / Re: 7D user - advice on my best option for a 'go to' lens?
« on: January 19, 2014, 11:57:54 AM »
My vote is the 24-105.  When I go out I take a 7D and the 24-105 and leave the rest at home. If I'm feeling really froggy I'll throw the 50mm 1.4 and a gorilla pod in a bag.  And most of the time, no cases. Just a rapid strap.

I haven't found a situation yet that is impossible with that combo. I guess if you were shooting mega landscapes it wouldn't work so hot. But then again I've got some solid shots with 24-105 and the f4 actually helped with the silky water ;)

Thinking back before I asked for that lens, I was worried about background separation and low light and such. Neither of those has been a big deal for me though now that I own it.  And the convenience of not changing lenses all the time far outweighs the times when I need to think about creative workarounds.

One thing I did buy though which I love is the pinchy lens cap. That was a nice upgrade. 

6
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Buy a 5D Mark III or Wait for ??? in 2014
« on: January 09, 2014, 08:56:55 AM »
Wait on the camera body and spend that $$$ on Lights.

7
Another body with an 18MP variant for a hyper specialized group of n00b shooters

8
EOS Bodies / Re: Prediction for next round of DSLR cameras
« on: October 01, 2013, 06:08:41 PM »
Here is the punch list for upcoming DSLR's:
 - Awesome IQ/Low Noise in a crop = 7D Mark II
 - WIFI integration with every new prosumer model
 - New Sensors, not repurposed ones
 - EOS Cloud Storage up to X gig with Purchase (sync's card data to cloud when in range of hotspots) or LTE tether
 - 100pt Autofocus which fills the frame
 - Extra long life batteries
 - Builtin Receiver/Transmitter for Strobes and Off Camera Flash
 - OLED Top Menu


9
EOS Bodies / Best Travel, No Tripod Having, IQ Awesome, Body/Kit!
« on: September 17, 2013, 06:27:09 PM »
Trying to sift through the review rubble and get to the point where I understand the best kit for travel.  Domestic, International, Grocery Store, whatever.  Travel = Not my house or garage where I can grab a strobe.

Its a confusing quest because I'm thinking ... well you have to get something durable (7D ish), but you also want great anywhere light capability (5D ish) ... on the other hand IQ is why you are taking them anyway (1DS III?). 

And what about the glass?  Can't really enjoy a vacation hunched over from an Atlas like bag of gear.  Don't want to switch up the lenses constantly.  Need to grab what you need and move on quickly.  After all, there are things to see.

Is there a one size fits all combo from Canon's DSLR line that will give you awesome IQ, Focus, Durability, Etc. while being travel happy?

10
I've never used one but I have used the 1Ds mk3 extensively for the last 4 years. This is a full frame camera but I am lead to believe that the 1D mk3 is a crop sensor? the 1Dx is a full frame but the 1D mk4 is crop and a 1Ds mk4 was never produced.


You are teaching me stuff!  Challenging what I assumed to be FF.  When I read your posts I went here:
http://www.visibledust.com/sensorsizes.php

This shows:
EOS 1Ds Mark III          24 mm approx.         1.0 x
EOS-1D X                  24 mm approx.         1.0 x
EOS 1D Mark III        20 mm approx.         1.3 x
Canon 1D Mark IV        20 mm approx.         1.3 x
EOS-1D C                 24 mm approx.         1.0 x

Is the answer to your question 'Technology available at the time for two different purposes'?  And today they have the X ... FF and Fast.

Makes me wonder what the best portrait/landscape camera in this lineup really is??????  Clearly the winner for Sports/Action is the X.

11
EOS Bodies / 12 Step Program for Focusing
« on: August 30, 2013, 11:01:47 AM »
I'm really struggling with my 'perfect focus' results as of late.  I'm not sure if something happened but I need a 12 step program to get my focus locked on accurate.

Gear:  Canon 7D and 24-105.  Sometimes a 100mm F2.

Most of my pictures have people in them and they are active.  Its not what I would call action (not kids playing hockey), although there are those moments ... just more of being in an environment and interacting with the space around you.

For whatever reason ... it seems like I can nail the focus ... but then for several shots, I miss it.  And because everything is in focus on a 3" screen it really is difficult to constantly chimp to 10x just to see if the eyes are in focus.  That is my main focus point ... eyes.  I like the eyes focused and crisp.

Also, I should say I am shooting at 7.1 whenever lighting permits because things seem sharpest there.  But I don't know if I have a camera mode out of whack or a some setting, or what.  Just seems like the return rate on great pics is less and less.

Every comment welcome.  At this point I will try anything because I'm freaking out that I am going to miss a moment because I cant lock it in.

12
EOS Bodies / Re: The last Canon crop sensor - ever
« on: August 15, 2013, 08:20:19 AM »
But isn't the point of this thread really that APS-C has one foot out the door?

Reason's to keep crop sensors around:

FPS - I think the limitation here is more body and design than sensor;... right?

$$$ - Isn't this also at least 50% a body/design thing?  Cheaper body, materials, reduced feature set, less complex?

EFS - Investment in lenses wouldn't migrate to FF

Reach - Still a bit fuzzy on if this is a benefit.  I think you just see less.  Wouldn't you want to see more and zoom in post?

Competitors won't stop making them - That's ok.  That could prove to be a giant benefit to Canon.

And maybe this is like talking about flying cars ... but what if the 7D2 is a FF and melts everyone's minds!

13
EOS Bodies / Re: The last Canon crop sensor - ever
« on: August 14, 2013, 01:16:27 PM »
So FPS ... yes I know.  But throw out the box that is constraints.  I'm thinking that the future will have a new line up that has:

 - Super Good FF Sensor
        (o) 1 Series
        (o) 3 Series or something else like a D800 MP killer
 - Good FF Sensor
        (o) 5 Series
        (o) 6 Series
 - 5D II tech FF Sensor
        (o) 7 Series
        (o) Rebels

And see what would happen.  Your 7D folks, they get a glorious FF sensor which is on par with a 5D mark II.  And it can have a robust body and all of that stuff too.  Heck it can even have fast FPS.  But if you want better IQ, features, etc ... you climb the stack.

So if you think about it the big loss here is only really that EF-S lenses aren't really useful anymore.  And I'm not saying this is THE approach ... just saying that there is a way to still differentiate their lineup while being only FF based and with minimal casualties.  Just need the prices to stay relatively consistent from low to high.

I think something like that, with the right marketing and strategy, and a couple of new fancy bodies could really work.  And if you were just getting into the game ... new as of when this took hold, you wouldn't know anything different so FF would just be what you have always had.



14
EOS Bodies / Re: The last Canon crop sensor - ever
« on: August 14, 2013, 10:57:13 AM »
Lot's of feedback.  So here is my take:
 - I'm not a troll (just don't post often, sheesh folks)
 - I've seen Best Buy selling a 7D for 1699$ and then Slickdeals posting deals for a 6D body for 1500$ (I'm not comparing apples to apples I know this, just saying net net that the money is coming down for a FF)
 - The whole different strokes for different folks thing ... I get it.  Affordability, ... I get it.  But for a minute, assume when you reached for the shelf everything was FF and the prices were the same (think T3i FF).  IMO, I don't think that's too much of a stretch.

Overall, I was really just thinking about how cell phones and complex point and shoots and mirrorless are all sorta eating into the APS-C advantages.  (Please no stock broker responses, I'm not a market analyst).  I mean, if you think about it ... M4/3 (the good ones) are costly, but image quality, lenses and such can happen and its much more portable.  Phones are better than they were so who needs a good point and shoot.  Point and shoots are getting better and better with nicer lenses and such.  IQ on some of the point and shoots is pretty remarkable.

So what I was left with (in my thinking) is basically that an APS-C DSLR Camera can handle big glass.  Sure there are some other things, but honestly other smaller cameras CAN do those things.  For the hobbyist, wouldn't that person really be aspiring to FF from day one anyway?  I don't know anyone who uses a DSLR in the APS-C range who wouldn't trade right now for a FF regardless of where in the line up that falls.

So then I thought, if that really is the case and Canon is thinking Medium Format, maybe what they are really thinking is 'the APS-C market is going the way of the buggy whip'.  It didn't seem like a long shot to see APS-C fade away if a thousand dollar FF is within reach.

Great convo on this topic.  I hope Canon reads it.  Got some smart folks up in here!


15
EOS Bodies / The last Canon crop sensor - ever
« on: August 09, 2013, 07:56:34 AM »
So here we are ... 2013, almost 2014.  Canon has over a decade of churning out APS-C based cameras.  Canon releases the 6D with FF sensor, that you can now pickup for less than a 7D.  Bodies are made smaller, functionality is increasing, and seemingly limited only by firmware.

Is there an evolutionary path which leaves APS-C behind or exclusively for the point and shoot market?

What if Canon just said 'No more crop for us.  We're in the FF business.  Our cheapest DSLR is 999.99 and that's just the way it is.'

I think this is coming.  3 years from now ... APS-C is going the way of the buggy whip.

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