July 30, 2014, 06:47:55 AM

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Messages - RickSpringfield

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31
This was shot handheld with a G10 P&S, but I used flash to give me some contrast. Look at the light, your image has very low contrast.
  - Now I am totally DEPRESSED!

So, lets see if I get this right.  Try my test again.  Use a Flash, Use F8 and a High Shutter like 1/500 and lock it off on the tripod and it should be amazing by comparison.

Is there anything in camera I should be doing?  Because of video when I shoot Jpeg I shoot typically ProLost settings.  But I can use a different Pic profile or maybe just neutral.  I would think neutral would be good if the image was truly sharp.

32
Here is an example of what I am talking about.  I took this the other day and you can see its not tack sharp.  Yet it was locked off, continuous light but good light, and the 24-105.  So, I am fuzzy on how this looks so fuzzy.  To me it just looks softer than it should.


33
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Chasing Tack Sharp ... Just can't get there
« on: March 20, 2013, 09:32:05 AM »
So, a friend and I have been on this quest to shoot a photo like we have seen online countless times or in video training etc.  Its where you take a picture of a person and even when you zoom into it at 200% the clarity of the image and sharpness is just off the charts.

We have tried everything to replicate this level of sharpness and just cant.  Locked off on tripods, cable release, etc. Its just not working.

Are we expecting too much out of our gear?  We are both rocking Canon APS-C (7D, 60D) with good glass 100mm F2, 50 1.4, Zeiss 35mm F2, 25-105 F4.  It just feels like we are missing something somewhere because our expectations are to take pictures like scott kelby or joel grimes or someone where the sharpness even zoomed in is amazing without a bunch of post processing.

HELP!

34
EDIT:
Check out my Flickr page if you'd like to see some shots taken during my trip to Disney World.

Holy Toledo!  Those are the shots I want when I go!

Ok folks ... new question.  Should I buy a FF before I go if I want these or is it all about the glass and the talent?

35
Quote
most of my favorites were with the wide lens and most were at either 10mm or 22mm
- That is so cool - I wouldnt have thought wide would be important at all.  But the proof is in the pudding you know.  You shot those and loved em.

Quote
I would put a UV/clear filters on the lenses you bring.
- I would love some recommendations in this department. 

Quote
dessicant packs, as you will be going in and out of A/C and heat and lots of humidity
- Genius.  I didnt even think about the A/C.  I'll bet that is actually a pretty big deal too.  From 95 to 70 and back again.  I'm also guessing lenses fog?  I hadnt thought about that either ... but I should have.

Some great stuff and thanks for the pic links too!

36
... and a sweater.

Holy Toledo!  It was sweater cold?  I would love that :)

37
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http://www.disneyphotographyblog.com This is a great site I read before I went. All I carried was a T3i and one lens everyday. The 50mm 1.8 or the 28-135mm. I was mostly there for my kids so I was already carrying a bunch of stuff around.


Awesome.  Appreciate that.  I thought your video was great and it seemed like you were having alot of fun :)

38
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and the hassle with the rides and the heat made it unenjoyable to have a dslr with

Honestly, we have talked about that.  I have these visions in my head though of having these amazing photos of the castle at night etc.  Maybe all thats overkill tho.  Maybe THIS is what the G series Canon's are really for!

39
So here is the deal ... heading to Walt Disney World sometime in 2013.  We'll fly, we'll drive from hotel to parks daily, we'll spend all day at the parks and we'll drive back to the hotel exhausted. I've been to WDW before ... but not ever felt gear prepared. 

Do we go on water rides ... Yes.  Do we go on roller coasters ... Yes.  Do we bake in the ridiculously hot sun for hours ... Yes.

Here are the big things.  I am pretty sure I need only to take the body and a couple lenses.  But, what bag should I put these in to carry all day long in those conditions?  I have a big bag that wont be going with me.

Looking for advice on what to take (or buy and take) gear wise as well as something fast and friendly but comfortable for the conditions to put it in.  Also, I own no filters.  Is that a biggy?

Stuff I have (open to taking or leaving) 7D, 24-104, 50/1.4, 100/2, 18-135/Depends

Considering this is one of the most photographed places in the world ... I thought it might be nice to get some advice from those who have done it ... or even similar activities.

Cheers :)

40
I was actually shocked when I read the thread title because I recently did just the opposite (Had a 60D and bought a 7D).

Now my mind was all over the place before this happened.  Originally, I came from a Rebel XT and a friend of mine got into the DSLR video racket to make some extra money.  Turned out to be great for him (and for me), he loved his 60D.  When it came camera upgrade time, I bought a 60D, and I loved it (insert spring time bird chirping happy camera montage here)

   ................. time goes on ...................

My friend was right.  The 60D was a great camera.  We shot video with it in the freezing cold (seriously it was like -10F) for 6 hours one day.  We shot in the blistering sun for hours.  We shot in an upstairs 10x10 room with 5 500watt lights doing greenscreen for half a day.  Never overheated (but we sure did!).

I took the 60D on vacation.  Took stills.  Took pics of buildings and people and lots of random backside shots of the family which they hate.  It was 90+ everyday and humid and I wore the camera on my back in a backpack for 12 hours a day.  When it wasnt out hanging in the sun, it was in the backpack in the sun getting baked.  Never overheaded.  "Yeah, but how many pictures did you take?"  Approx 2500 over the course of a week.  5 were good; lol (thats just a joke not a commentary on focus or something).

SO WHY ON EARTH DID YOU WANT A 7D!

At the end of the day not having the 7D was like being poked in the side everytime I used my camera.  You remember traveling with your siblings in the backseat of the car and they would purposefully block you from looking out their window with their big head and you knew what they were doing and even though they never said they were doing that you wanted to throttle them anyway?  Well, maybe you don't.  But not having the 7D felt like that.

I wanted to see my video during shooting on a better monitor .... but the 60D doesnt do that.  I was always a little worried when I was outside with my 60D because ...heck, sometimes it rains, snows, or there is just dirt in the air.  And not that I was 2nd Camera on the filming of Hidalgo2 or anything, but I did find myself in the wind with a camera from time to time.  I'm not a sports photographer ... but I am a dad.  And Jerry Rice doesn't have anything on a kid in the yard.  So burst was always handy, and more seemed ... well, enticing.

But the hands down over the top all day decision maker for me was the feeling in the hand.  I loved the button placement and the grip feeling and where my hand naturally fell when I wasn't in hurry up and shoot mode.  I loved the camera or video switcheroo on the back and the joystick.  Then I watched the digitalrev video of the 7D Durability test where they set it on fire, froze it into a block of ice, and it still worked.  At that point ... the checkbook opened.

Not every time ... but sometimes, I found myself feeling limited and that started me down the path of 60D doubt.  Now ... I didnt then, and I don't now have Sony FS700 or Canon C300 kick butt video camera money.  And I don't really have full frame money (although one could certainly make an argument here with all the doodads I bought for this camera).  So the idea of a 7D and a great video camera just wasnt in the cards.

Advice wise, its such a crazy mental game when it comes to these cameras.  Everyone wants to own a kickbutt video camera and a 1DX for taking pictures of the dog... but thats not going to happen... so we anquish through degrees of consumer compromise.  !!!BLAST YOU CANON MARKETING!!!

At the end of the day, whichever camera you feel good about choosing and using is the camera for you.  Critics be darned.  The decision is as personal as the shoes on your feet.

:) Cheers

41
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Best Lenses for Video for Canon 5D Mark III?
« on: February 07, 2013, 08:54:50 AM »
I recommend Zeiss as well.  Buy this one:  Zeiss 35/F2

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/658553-REG/Zeiss_1762_850_Distagon_35mm_T.html

A friend of mine is a wonderful DP and shoots with this lens.  What you should know ahead of time is that Zeiss are Manual Focus (with focus assist).  I'm not sure if you are just getting into the DSLR vid game or have been doing it for a bit, but you'll always be shooting manual anyway so this isnt a drawback for video.  Zeiss have amazing CONTRAST in the image.  This is really nice because things pop when you lock on focus ... like eyes.  Build quality is really second to none.  Its all metal and glass.  Seriously.  There aren't any plastic doojobbies.  Its just all metal and glass.

There isn't any IS ... but IS is a tricky bugger.  Lets say you want to use the DSLR video to take the place of your camcorder which is an aging VHS and looks like a shoulder mounted rocket launcher.  Well, then I would get an IS lens.  If you have kids and parades and such, that might mean something that gets as wide as 35 or as long as 200.  Perhaps the new Canon 35-200 F2 L for $1299.00?  This lens is only available through http://www.fantasylandcameralensestheywontmakeeventhoughwewantthem.com.  And its ususally out of stock.  But that would be a perfect lens for the whole kids and parades situation.  As a close second, go with the 24-70 or the 70-200.  Either sacrifices a bit (wide or long) so you'll have to decide.

On the other hand, you might be a person looking for a lens to start down the path of being 'Philip Bloom:  Part Deux'.  And if this is the case, I really think the Zeiss glass will serve you well.  Its not IS, Its not AF ... but it is a prime, it is very contrasty, and it is built like a tank (and with a good focus throw I might add).  Or.... you could get a Cinema lens; but ...

Up until about a year ago I didnt even realize there were lenses made for cinema.  Turns out I wasn't supposed to find out either because typically this information is kept secret by a group of people called the 'Loyal Order Of the Prime' or L.O.O.P for short.  Apparently their whole goal is to ensure cinema lenses are only known by a few and even if you find out about them ... make every retailer have the prices so high only persons owning exotic european sportscars would even consider buying one.  I'm pretty sure I had a run in with a L.O.O.P member last year. I was strangly and randomly questioned on location by a passerby asking what kind of lens I was using.  I knew he was L.O.O.P because he had a Tatoo on his neck that said 'T1.4'.  Scary stuff!

I am sure there are other great lenses as well, but Zeiss I've seen it in action and witnessed the output through post grading.  Pretty awesome.  The minus on a prime is that they come standard with 'foot zoom' ...meaning you have to walk closer to your subject to get closer shots.

Happy Buying!

42
Lenses / Re: Finally!
« on: February 07, 2013, 07:39:46 AM »
Congrats! Based on that nice photo you took of the lens its clear your skills will put that lens to good use :)

43
Lighting / Re: Constant lighting vs strobe
« on: February 03, 2013, 05:46:07 PM »
Lighting is tough because for video, you could honestly want only a 1 light setup.  Or maybe 10 lights.  Or somewhere in between.  If you were doing studio pics only, there are lots of 2,3,4 lightsets that different posters have suggested ... but video is a whole different ball of wax.  Personally, I tried to do this same thing ... but what I found for me ... Studio Strobes do a great job with pictures and CFLs and HMIs do a great job for Video.  But there is a monumental price uptick to get into some of these 'good' video lights.  I can't touch the prices with a 10' pole.  Peter Hurley shoots continuous in the studio ... but he also uses those same over the moon priced lights.  Your budget, what you shoot, where you shoot, could make a huge difference in choice for this one.

44
If you can swing it ... I would buy the pieces you need separately and start by having a plan on paper - Which matches how you plan to light the scene 'most' of the time.  I second the motion to stay away from continuous lighting because for portrait your going to need to work harder to control it.

Some considerations:
 - Living Rooms have windows, and windows add ambient natural light ... Where you setup could really impact the look of the pics
 - Make sure you buy a rigid backdrop support just in case you need to shade the window light with heavy muslin (or layered)
 - Big Octabanks and Strip Banks with egg crates make for nice portraits (umbrella's maybe not so much in the house ... always some stray light there)
 - Don't forget the reflectors and flags and clamps and lightstands (air cushioned please)
 - Also, C-stands work great and if you get the collapsible turtle bases they can tuck away (very sturdy, but wicked heavy)
 - Apple Boxes or Sitting Props (standing gets old, and old people really dont like sitting on the floor)
 - A wireless or cable shutter release
 - Flashy Sync Things (Pocket Wizard, SkyPorts, or cables ... whatever your budget can afford)
 - A box of fine chocolates for your significant other and a thank you card
 - A 12pk of Gum or Mints for you (because photographers with bad breath = yuck) :)

You could get away with lots less ... and plenty more ... but whatever you do, make sure you get the chocolates, card, and gum!

Best of luck to you :)  Post Pics when done please!

45
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Philip Bloom reviews Canon 1DC
« on: January 31, 2013, 08:14:37 AM »
Just posting something so I can occupy the same forum space as Philip Bloom for a couple minutes :)  I need to spend a few years in England because everything he says sounds like the truth with that accent.  I'll bet that works wonders when he travels abroad.  British accent + Director/Producer/Cinematographer + Gear = Approachable James Bond to many I bet.  Kudos to you PB!

And to those that watched the review ... let me just say by far the coolest part is when he says 'When I went back to England Canon UK were kind enough to lend me the camera' ... Now thats clout!

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