December 20, 2014, 08:55:14 AM

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Messages - pj1974

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1
Lenses / Re: Review: Canon EF 24-105 f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
« on: December 17, 2014, 04:22:44 PM »
I think Canon has achieved a good balance, ie got their ‘lens line’ right - with the STM lenses improving on the former ‘basic’ / kit lenses. Optically, Canon have yet to make a STM lens with poor IQ (both primes & zooms). I’ve used STM and they’re definitely quicker than ‘old’ (non  STM / non USM) AF.  But yes, I prefer USM over STM (I don’t do much video at all).  1 video for every 1000 photos or so! ;)

There are 2 versions of the 18-135, neither have USM (one is ‘old’ AF and one is STM). Canon did have a 28-135mm USM (which I had in the day) and a 17-85mm USM, and currently the 17-55mm f/2.8 and the 15-85mm USM (the latter I have, and love as a walk around). Their 18-55mm STM and 55-250mm STM both have very good STM (even very decent wide open).

I’m curious to see more comparisons between this 24-105mm STM and the 24-104mm L USM optically. From Bryan’s review, it appears the 24-105mm performs solidly (not that I’m interested in getting it.. at least not yet). Sigma’s 24-105 HSM is very similar optically to Canon’s (different strengths & weaknesses).

Indeed, I’m also looking forward to / awaiting Canon to release a 50mm f/2 USM (possibly IS)- or wider than f/2 would be nice too.  C’mon Canon… pretty please… not too long now!

2
EOS Bodies / Re: Patent: Canon EF-S 11-24mm f/3.5-4.5
« on: November 18, 2014, 10:03:45 PM »
On standard zooms, they aren't terribly part apart if memory serves, perhaps 1-2 mm or so?  But on longer glass the differences can be quite pronounced.

Speaking in mm focal length this is correct, but the effect of +-1 mm on a wide angle lens has much more impact than 10 or 20mm on a tele zoom. You can always crop in a little, but you cannot restore data if your lens wasn't wide enough. That's why I'm currently happy with my 17-40L, even though you might say the 17-24 range isn't such a big deal in objective terms.

Yeah, agree.  On the wide end, 2mm is a huge deal.   Many people prefer the slower 15-85 EF-S lens over the quicker 17-55 EF-S solely because of that key extra width.  And a number of landscape guys still haven't forgiven Canon for yet offering another 16-35 when they were screaming for a 14-24.

- A

The extra 2 + the extra 30 + I think its better glass...  on the other end the you can work around 2.8 on an all purpose zoom


The reason I bought the Canon 15-85mm, is that for my style of photography it is a great balance in a useful focal length zoom, while retaining high image quality.  I find the 17-50/55mm or the 18-55mm lenses just miss the mark in terms of what I like for a walk-around zoom.  Plus when I want ‘fast glass’ – I don’t want f/2.8 (I consider that ‘moderately fast’) – I need to go for f/1.4 – f/2.

In terms of this rumour of an UWA EF-S 11-24 from Canon – I just can’t see how it ‘fits’. The EF-S 10-22mm USM continues to be a well performing, decent selling UWA.  Then the recent 10-18mm IS STM is a great budget option (with superb bang for one’s $!).  And the EF-M 11-22mm IS well, that’s proven to be a great lens for EOS-M.

Yes, I love UWA… and that’s why I upgraded from to the Sigma 8-16mm HSM… it’s an awesome lens for APS-C cameras. The only real ‘handy’ improvement would be to add OS (stabilisation). But the difference from 10mm (which I was previously limited to) to 8mm really makes a big difference, (cf the difference from 12.8mm to 16mm in FF format).

While we’ve got great choice in UWA’s for APS-C already, here’s hoping more great quality UWAs are in the pipeline from various manufacturers!

3
Lenses / Re: A Couple of Real World EOS 7D Mark II High ISO Samples
« on: November 04, 2014, 08:40:09 AM »
Definitely a solid performance from the 7DmkII at those high ISO's. This is looking like a winner of an APS-C sensored  DSLR from Canon. :)

4
Lenses / Re: More chatter on an EF 11-24 F/4L coming soon
« on: October 03, 2014, 12:06:37 AM »
I don't put too much stock into CanonWatch, but they are claiming to have a source saying that an EF 11-24 F/4L lens is happening:

http://www.canonwatch.com/ef-11-24mm-f4l-coming-probably/

Some of you in a recent poll implied that this forum community's desire for a Nikon 14-24 F/2.8 clone was less based on that lens's spectacular sharpness and more based on the opportunity the 14mm wide end on that zoom might offer.  So I'd imagine -- were this rumor true -- some folks would be super duper happy about this.

But even if this picture was not a fake, no front filterability (without a comically large aftermarket outrigger) would be DOA for me.  I'll happily enjoy my 16-35 F/4L IS and call my UWA needs sated. 

- A

We live in exciting times… a 11-24mm f/4 L would be a very welcome lens within Canon’s already significant arsenal of lenses (Canon have done a great job with the recent 16-35mm f/4 L USM).

That’s why I am so happy with my Sigma 8-16mm. On my Canon 7D, it produces images at the FF equivalent of a stunning 12.8mm! In addition, my Sigma ultra wide angle (UWA) lens is terrifically sharp – even wide open at 8mm. And it has very low (and conveniently correctable) CA’s.  Much less than my previous lens, the Sigma 10-20mm.

Naturally I admit that my Sigma 8-16mm is not f/2.8.  But for 99% of my UWA photos, I do not need f/2.8.  Now I certainly wouldn’t sneeze if IS would become available in a new APS-C UWA.  That would possibly be the only reason I would upgrade my current UWA lens.  But at this stage, I’m very happy – and when light is low (or I want to undertake certain challenging photos), I use my trusty Manfrotto tripod to ensure the most superior results.

Looking forward to what Canon may come out with.. even though the only lens I’m really interested in now, is an updated EF 50mm IS USM…..

Regards....  Paul  :)

5
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Why haven't you left canon?
« on: September 30, 2014, 11:50:29 PM »
Several reasons.

But if I could sum it up in 1 sentence, it would be something like this:

The number of Canon attributes that I prefer to the competition (other major brands) outweighs the (other) attributes any other brand can offer over Canon.

The things in particular that have influenced me to buy Canon DSLRs include the following:

Their DSLR lenses
Ergonomics
Implementation of AF
High ISO quality / capability
Output colours
Software options / compatibility
DPAF
Live View
Video implementation

There are a few other factors that other brands may be superior in, but none of these are deal breakers to me.

(I currently have the 7D, have used Canon FF and will likely upgrade to the 7DmkII)

The vast majority of photos I take will not be noticeably limited by any of the factors that other brands may be (slightly superior in).  I cover a vast range of photography, from events, macro, landscapes, wildlife, casual sports, family/ memories, some portrait, etc.  I also make use of HDR photography, time lapse, etc, etc.

Paul

6
Post Processing / Re: Digital "Enlarger"
« on: September 30, 2014, 11:28:05 PM »
As a long ago public relations photog I have printed tens of thousands of 8x10's the "analog" way - mostly B/W but some color as well.  I agree it was always magical and the skills to do effective dodging and burning were something I was proud to have.  And, yes, there are times I long for "the old way."  But when I do, I remember what a pain it was to have to develop several roles of film (often pushed to the amazing ASA of 1600) , select one key shot and then print two dozen copies of the same negative, all dodged and burned as needed, washed, dried and ready for courier delivery to news outlets within a couple hours of an event to make their deadlines.  Let's not even suggest doing localized color corrections.

The chemical stains have faded from my fingers now and I think my lungs are clear.  While it might be fun to do a chemical print or two just for old times sake, I'll take digital any day.  Emailing a .jpg is soooo much easier.

+1

I definitely do not miss the analogue days, with the hassles of film, chemicals and much slower processes and limitations to what we can do easier (& often better) with digital these days.

The ability to share my photos with friends easily is one of the BEST things about the internet and digital imagery. (I use many methods, including Google/Picasa, Facebook, 500px,  and I have a number of other accounts, eg Flickr, Imagebucket, etc)

Printing multiple copies of a 'favourite photo' and then giving (or sending/posting) to people around the world was so much more expensive - before the internet & digital photography came into their own.

Long live convenience, cost savings and more environmentally friendly options I say!

Paul

7
Lenses / Re: Choose your Weapon: Ultra Wide Zooms for Canon
« on: September 16, 2014, 11:25:45 PM »
I love my Sigma 8-16mm and would vote for it.... but the vote / poll is only for FF.

I have used the Canon 10-22mm, Sigma 10-20mm on APS-C, but the Sigma 8-16mm is still my favourite.

On a friend's FF I have used 17-40mm, but would probably prefer the new 16-40mm f/4 because of the IS.

I've heard good reports of the EF-S 10-18mm IS and the EF-M 11-22mm IS too.

Paul

8
Lenses / Re: The New EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
« on: September 11, 2014, 08:30:46 AM »
This could be a very interesting lens... a lightweight 'kit' lens, especially suited to the 6D.

Lightweight and 'decent' build.

STM AF (not as good as USM, but notably better than non STM/ non USM AF).

Very useful 4 stops IS.....

Canon have yet to make a bad STM lens... and I trust / hope this lens follows suit.

Paul

9
EOS Bodies / Re: Are you planning to purchase a 7D2
« on: September 02, 2014, 01:35:26 AM »
An interesting result....

Despite the negativity about various rumoured features, it comes close to an even split between those planning to purchase and those who wont. This might indicate a well selling model.... but of course everything depends on what the real camera is, and unfortunately we will probably have to wait for an official announcement for that.

I find it a bit disturbing that only 7% might buy one after they test it, 31.5% will only buy one if reviewed positively.  While reviews are useful for gathering information, I think making a purchasing decision primarily on a review for something like a camera (or lens) is a bad idea.   Reviewers rarely capture and communicate all of the positives and negatives of a device effectively, and only you can see if feels right for you.
Agreed. Ergonomics is a big thing... One of the reasons why I went Canon instead of Nikon was because I hated the Nikon user interface....

+1  Ergonomics are indeed very important. My initial Canon DSLR didn’t have the best grip –other ergonomics were ‘ok’, but over time Canon have got better, and particularly when I upgraded to the 7D, that camera was (and is) just the right size / DSLR form for me.  (I categorise “pocketable” cameras differently in terms of requirements, including IQ, ergonomics, etc).

I tried a few Nikon cameras – and ergonomically they never felt as ‘right’ for me as their Canon counterparts. In addition, I prefer Canon’s colours, AND definitely Canon’s lens selection.

I believe the 7DmkII will be a well-selling camera. (if there ever will be ‘such a beast’ – and indications are – that yes, there will be one, and hopefully we’ll know later this month!)

My take on it (based on the current market, recent DSLR trends – and the history of the 7D) – is that the 7DmkII will likely not sell in huge quantities in the ‘short term’ (ie not like quantities that the entry level DSLRs sell in). However, with a rich feature set, adequate IQ, great functionality and good durability, an ergonomically friendly top of the line Canon APS-C camera will sell well for many years.

The 7D’s grip, and all other ergonomics are so good for my hand / use.  I love using it.  Having said that, I do hope that the 7DmkII will also feature a great implementation of touch screen technology (and hopefully a sturdy swivel screen – with DPAF, hopefully trickling ‘up’ from the 70D).

Let’s see.  Days are counting down!!

10
EOS Bodies / Re: Are These The EOS 7D Mark II Specifications?
« on: August 28, 2014, 02:37:31 AM »

Happy Birthday!
I hit 55 next weekend... I asked for a 600F4 for my birthday.... I will probably get a pair of socks :)

Hopefully they are "Canon" socks!   :o
With size 13 1/2 feet I am almost guaranteed "Big Whites"...

 ;D  ;D  ;D
Good one.

Well, with my Australian foot size of 8.5 I will have to settle for my 70-300mm L socks (not quite a 'big white')

And thanks for the birthday wishes! I hope for several happy years of photography ahead....  :)

11
EOS Bodies / Re: Are you planning to purchase a 7D2
« on: August 27, 2014, 07:47:58 PM »
With all the hype on the forum about the 7D2, the question is asked.... "Are you going to get one"?

Who is serious about the camera and who is just kicking tires or wondering about Canon's possible plans for the future?

I just posted in the ‘loooong’ thread (at the time on page 49) “Are These The EOS 7D Mark II Specifications?” indicating that yes, it’s likely I will purchase the 7DmkII at some stage (if it’s reviewed favourably).

In essence, (summary here) is that I would be interested in seeing what changes / improvements the 7DmkII brings to Canon’s flagship APS-C camera… I have been very happy with my 7D since purchasing it soon after it was released.

I enjoy photography immensely – taking photos across a variety of genres, and share with friends. I also teach photography to many friends informally.

I see photography as blend of artistic expression, applied technical competence, using one’s understanding of light & physics as well as creativity.
(Indeed, to me photography is much much more than just talking about gear as gadgets!)

So… c’mon Canon – show us what you have got!

Cheers & best wishes

Paul

12
EOS Bodies / Re: Are These The EOS 7D Mark II Specifications?
« on: August 27, 2014, 07:38:23 PM »

Definitely an indication of pent-up demand..... I wonder how many will purchase one?

I thought the same thing, but when scrolling through all the pages, there are really only a handful of characters making the majority of all of this noise.  But I do think that the existence of hundreds of 7DII posts that have popped up here over the last year might be a good indication of pent up demand.

To answer your question:  I'll likely be an early adopter.
Same for me...
I was sorely tempted when to 70D came out... but sat on it in the hopes of an even better AF system on a successor to the 7D.... As long as they don't make it worse than the 70D (and that just isn't going to happen) I intend to get one too.... perhaps I should start up a poll :)

The 7DmkII is definitely a camera that I’m interested in purchasing.

My first DSLR was the Canon 350D. I’m very happy with my purchase of the 7D a short time after it was released. The 7D is, understandably, superior in every way. I enjoy a mix of photography, but mainly landscape, wildlife, macro & some ‘events’ (usually in reasonable light – eg outdoor & children camps that I am also the director of).

The 7D’s size, features, ergonomics, IQ, responsiveness, etc – really make it a great camera. I’m assuming that the 7DmkII would be an ‘action-oriented’ APS-C with a rich good feature set. I would be very surprised if it was anything but this.

I have a range of lenses that really suit my 7D, from my awesome UWA Sigma 8-16mm to my handy all purpose Canon 15-85mm. I also own the delicious Canon 100mm macro (I love live-view for many macro shots) to the compact yet high IQ tele-zoom Canon 70-300mm L.

How soon I might purchase a 7DmkII depends on a number of factors:
-   If my 7D ‘kicks the bucket’ – or develops some other serious fault
-   IQ improvement over the 7D, especially at low ISO in poor light
-   AF (I have learned to get great shots by understanding the 7D’s AF ability well)
-   Screen (touch screen, sturdy swivel screen my hope)
-   Price (this is obviously relatively important, but to me I have an approximate budget of AUD$2,500 set aside)
-   Who knows, Canon might release a 7DmkIII 2 years down the track, and I might end up getting that instead! :D

I don’t plan to move to FF for a number of reasons. I hope some of you will get a laugh out of this as one reason: to prove that one doesn’t need to use a  FF DSLR to produce great photos!
In fact, I have many photos from an early P&S Fuji digital camera that I (and others) still consider ‘lovely photos’

So yes… I’m very much looking forward to the Photokina announcements, particularly if Canon has the 7DmkII coming out then (as far as I have read, the 7DmkII is not even a 100% certainty, though there appear to be a number of indicators that it IS coming out next month, right?) Sure multiple threads and surely 49 pages of posts in 1 thread can’t be wrong! Lol  (And this is my contribution to this thread).

I might place a quick post on your other thread, Don!  Cheers (again, like I have written previously – I particularly appreciate your positive and balanced input on this thread).

Have a good end to the week everyone… 1 more day and it’s the weekend here in Australia!
This weekend I turn 40….  :)

Regards

Paul

13
Lenses / Re: Safari 300 2.8 Mkii or 200-400 1.4x
« on: July 17, 2014, 08:20:13 AM »
I've done quite a lot of travel in my life - from Australia (where I was born) to Europe (where I lived for about 11 years) to Asia (visited a number of times).  So while I haven't been to Africa (or your particular safari) I have used various camera / lens configurations during my overseas trips / holidays.

My advice would be to go with the zoom. Much more flexible for composing shots of various animals (small to large size, near or far).  And generally in Africa, for a 'safari setting' f/4 to f/5.6 works fine.

So for such a holiday I'd go for the 200-400mm 1.4x f/4 L zoom over the 300mm f/2.8 L prime any day.  And as you said, you don't want to be changing separate 1.4x and/or 2x TCs all the time.

Be careful with your gear (Any photographic gear will potentially attract attention - including possibly from some people who might think to 'relieve you of it'.  So... will it be insured? Will you be with someone else? What are you plans for storage? etc)   I generally find having 1 body and a flexible (eg zoom, and IS) lens is better than 2 bodies on 'holiday' situations. Especially when you have a big lens... just don't weigh yourself down too much.

Hope you enjoy yourself.  Best wishes. And I look forward to see some photos of your safari after you've returned!

Paul

14
Site Information / Re: Post Precessing Section
« on: July 14, 2014, 01:37:11 AM »
This would be good... post processing can be very important (for some photos more than others).

I have been a member of another photography forum on the interweb for many years, and they had a ‘post processing’ section that I (& many others) found very helpful.

So I would love CR (one of my fav photography websites currently) to have a Post Processing part of the forum.  Cheers (& hopefully thanks in advance!)

PJ   8)

15
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II [CR1]
« on: July 13, 2014, 06:56:54 AM »
If the focus ring was at the other end of the push/pull barrel so it didn't get turned accidentally, and if the IS was worth anything, it would be a far more pleasant lens to use.

Have you used the 70-300L?  The design places the focus ring next to the body, the zoom ring further out. That's reversed from other L lenses, and means your hand (well, mine at any rate) reflexively grabs the focus ring when intending to zoom.  A real PITA, and if the new 100-400 has a similar design, it would be unfortunate.

I own the older Tamron super zoom (200-500mm). Its focus ring is placed where it is next to the camera's body...and I kind of like it that way! When used on a monopod or tripod, it seems a lot better that way...but certainly different from my Canon lenses.

I own a number of Canon L lenses - which started out with the Canon 28-135mm 'back in the day' which has the focus ring close to the body, and the zoom ring further away. (I've since sold the Canon 28-135mm)

Currently the 15-85mm and 70-300mm L are among my 2 favourite lenses (mainly used on my 7D) - and I actually prefer the configuration of focus ring close to body and zoom ring further away. The Canon 70-300mm L won for me over a number of other options  (a few years ago) - because of it's IQ and size/weight.  I did consider the 100-400mm... but that extra 100mm of zoom wasn't 'worth it' for me (I understand it might be for others).

I have used the 100-400mm a number of times, i.e. using friend's lenses, borrowing, etc. I became more accustomed to the 'push pull' after some time than I thought I would, but still generally by 'instinct' prefer a zoom ring, and a zoom ring nearer the end of my lenses. Having said that, I know it would be a different story if I had only got used to lenses with the zoom closer to the body (eg if I had owned the Canon 24-105mm L instead of the Canon 28-135mm).  But hey, the Canon 24-105mm L wasn't around at the time I got into photography!

I have owned 3 x Sigma UWA lenses (and initially found it mildly inconvenient on each that 1) the zoom rotates the other way AND 2) the focus is at the end and zoom ring is nearer the body. Thankfully I pretty much have a 'mental switch' in my mind now, so when I put my Sigma 8-16mm on my camera, I somewhat reflectively know it's on and my hand/mind know what to do (eg in the dark).

Horses for courses... but most importantly, enjoy your gear and take great photos.  I trust that Canon will have done their research (& design) well; and if they do come out with a 100-400mm L II (or similar) that they will come out with an awesome lens.   However I doubt I'll be buying one... as the 70-300mm L meets my needs very well.

Best wishes all...

Paul

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