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Messages - Drizzt321

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841
Lenses / Re: Please explain the need for f2.8 zooms
« on: January 30, 2013, 07:19:26 PM »
When you say 1 stop better, are you just talking about sensor noise performance or AF sensor performance?

My question is purely about sensor performance and why f2.8 will stay that important forever.

There is also another thing that you may not think of, is that lenses wide open generally don't perform their best.

... unless you're scraping together the money for a Canon 24-70L2

basically having a wide aperture available is like a condom
its better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it :P

Ok, thanks for the answer from a real world pro, so you're on the side that even f2.8 isn't really "fast" enough and it just happens so that the fastest zooms available are f2.8. So if I understand you correctly you'd rather go with a Tamron f2.8 + a faster prime like the Sigma 35mm than a Canon 24-70/f2.8 for the price of both combined?

Well, even the Canon 24-70 v2 performs better stopped down. I never said that wide-open you can't get a lens that performs awesome. But if you stop down the Canon 24-70 v2 it gets even better.

That said, what lens(es) you chose often boils down to shooting styles, convenience (a high quality 24-70 is a lot easier to go 24, then 35, then 50 than changing primes), and can it get you what you want. Is it the best tool for the job, for what your budget can afford, and for how and what you are shooting.

Personally, while I wouldn't quite call myself a shooting pro, but I am shooting the residency for a small dance group, and while I'm renting the Tamron 24-70 for the next performance in a week, and probably buying that lens in the next 3-4 months. Not quite the weight of wickedwombat, or a couple of the other forum members, but I always seem to shoot in low or crazy lighting and I've found fast primes or f/2.8 zoom is practically a necessity. If you're shooting in decent lighting, or a studio or something, then ask if you really need a f/2.8 zoom. For me, I'm not shooting in those environments, so I've said yes, I do need a f/2.8 zoom (and the 70-200 some day, *sigh*).

Do you find yourself wide open all the time even as the ISO climbs higher and higher? Or are you comfortable going with a slower shutter and/or higher ISO and find an f/4 zoom is fine for you?

842
You are correct that color temperature is not subjective. But you're missing the point that a different sensor will render the colors a bit different, especially if it is from a different line of sensors. Like the T3i & 60D & 7D all use more or less the same sensor, so the color rendering should be fairly similar. But the 5d2 and 5d3 sensors are actually different.

Now, do the colors look exactly the same when you apply the 2 different white balance settings? Remember, the RAW file is the data the sensor collects. You then need to add a white-balance to correct what the sensor sees, which means even when you 'view' it without any processing, you're really either viewing the embedded preview JPG, or the RAW viewers processing with the built-in settings based on what the camera said the WB should be.

843
Lenses / Re: Please explain the need for f2.8 zooms
« on: January 30, 2013, 06:41:23 PM »
Well, as Ziser said, f/4 or f/5.6 would be better since it gets more of your subject(s) in focus, and with a strobe you get plenty of light while stopping down further would make it harder to get any of your background in the image, it'd end up basically just being extremely sharp, or you'd see drastically more shadows from the strobe.

The thing to know about the 6D, is it's not really considered a 'professional' camera as such. Sure, it's a fine camera, but features and build quality is generally not up to 'pro'. Heck, Canon only calls the 1D-series as 'pro' cameras, everything else isn't.

When you say 1 stop better, are you just talking about sensor noise performance or AF sensor performance? Even though the center point AF sensor works fine with f/4 lenses, I believe it also has a double cross-point sensors there which are likely only available on an f/2.8 lens. Thus, you still get the point where your AF will likely be improved by having an f/2.8 lens, even if you take the shot at f/4 or f/5.6, even in available light.

The other factor is, if you could choose between f/2.8 or f/4, and the difference was ISO 3200 vs ISO 6400, which would you chose? If ISO 6400 is perfectly fine with you, go for it. If you want to drop down to ISO 3200, or increase your shutter speed while staying at ISO 6400, then you'd need to go for the f/2.8 lens.

There is also another thing that you may not think of, is that lenses wide open generally don't perform their best. I'm referring to resolution, CA, etc. f/2.8->f/4 can often make a difference for a lens, and f/2.8->f/5.6 can make a big difference. That's why the top end primes go to f/1.2-f/1.4. Sure, being able to shoot wide-open and get pretty good performance is great, but if you stop them down to f/2 or f/2.8, you get some really great performance while still being able to keep higher shutter speeds.

844
Sports / Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« on: January 30, 2013, 06:30:12 PM »
@Narcolepsy, great shot, like the original. If it was mine I think I'd keep full width but crop it top/bottom to give 1x2 format.

Agreed. Make it seem more of a panoramic. If that were mine I'd make a print of it and hang it on the wall, it's fantastic.

845
Some decent lighting will let you stop down which will increase the DoF which will make it easier to get the subject in focus. And you can always put a mark on the floor or something, and start recording, go stand in place, wait for a second or two, then begin which will let you edit out the start & end.

Yep...right now, I'm working on learning more about lighting. I have some stands and I've bought different sized clamp lights from the hardware store, and a few diffusers and clamps.

I'm trying to do somewhat of a 3 point lighting...but am limited to the layout of my kitchen..and the mixed lights there (halogen track lighting) and my clamp lights are CFLs...all in the daylight (5500 I think?) range.

Like I mentioned, I got something heavy to clamp a large, tall ruler onto....which I used instead of marking the floors...with this I can know where my head,  nose and chin are...and compose the scene knowing better where I'll stand..and focus on that ruler...

Do something like this...no big deal hitting start manually...walking into the scene..doing your bit...walking to hit stop.

That's what editing is for....and since I don't have a clap board, I often use that beginning to talk to describe anything about the scene I want to remind myself about during editing....

Don't forget to do manual white balance, and you also can use some gels to get all the lighting to be more or less close to the same color temp, which will make it a lot easier to get good looking footage. Don't forget you can use just about anything to flag (block) to get the lighting right where you want it, or use some poster board to reflect light to fill in the side or bottom or your face, or somewhere else. There's a ton you can do with lighting. And use gaffer's tape, a lot easier to work with than duct tape for anything you may not need to permanently tape together.

846
Sports / Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« on: January 30, 2013, 11:49:23 AM »
One I got in December

Gorgeous! Just a tiny bit of motion blur to the rider and horse, but it's perfect sense of motion and capture of the moment. Well done!

847
Site Information / Re: Forum recommendations
« on: January 30, 2013, 11:48:14 AM »
For the login issue, instead of simply using the username/password boxes in the upper right, use the login link, and you can choose how long to stay logged in, or to always stay logged in.

848
Some decent lighting will let you stop down which will increase the DoF which will make it easier to get the subject in focus. And you can always put a mark on the floor or something, and start recording, go stand in place, wait for a second or two, then begin which will let you edit out the start & end.

849
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Philip Bloom reviews Canon 1DC
« on: January 29, 2013, 12:50:20 PM »
I remember reading something about the price difference having something to do with extra/higher Tax(es) when manufacturing (Don't quote me exactly on this) cameras that can film/capture content longer than 29:59 minutes. Anything after that is considered 'broadcast' (I think, again don't quote me) and incurs the higher tax(es), which is why 1DX/5DIII etc can only record for 29:59.
I'll have a look for the article and post it later.

Oh yea, there's EU taxes and stuff on over 29:59 minutes. Forgot about those. Not sure that that's part of the price, or something that the customer ends up paying.

850
Sports / Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« on: January 29, 2013, 12:48:56 PM »
Your grand niece is very cute with that pony.

One comment, not sure if you're able to, but a fill-flash (preferably a 430EX or 580EX class, or even off camera) would help greatly for riders faces.

Also you're at ISO 400 @/f13, any particular reason you are stopping down so far instead of f/7.1 or f/8 or so? 1/500 is good, but you probably could go faster with ISO100 @f/7.1, and you'd probably get slightly sharper images, since on a crop you tend to (depending on pixel counts) start hitting diffraction limits quicker than full frame.



cheers for the comments.....
I dont like using Flash on or off the camera near the horses...as you never know if your going to spook one near you

The conditions look better than they were and with I was using the large Sigma Lens which cuts alot of light out in itself...

Yea, I figured using a flash around most animals would tend to spook them, unless you have them trained to it. You might need to slightly over-expose the overall image, and bring down the rest of the image in post in order to get more light on the faces.

851
EOS Bodies / Re: 7D- Hot Pixels and Noisy Photos
« on: January 28, 2013, 06:16:28 PM »
Have you enabled the long exposure subtraction method? This takes another exposure at the same length, but without actually triggering the shutter (or manually put the lens cap on and do it yourself in post). This basically takes a shot with the sensor without actually letting any light hit the sensor so it can use subtraction to remove much of the noise which can occur during a long exposure.

However, if they're showing up all over the place, that doesn't sound good. I don't have experience with the 7D, so I don't know if this is typical for the 7D.

852
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Philip Bloom reviews Canon 1DC
« on: January 28, 2013, 05:57:04 PM »
It does look good no doubt the best DSLR for video ever but it is a bit ridiculous that if they are going to double the price just for a firmware upgrade to not have put in such utter basics as zebra, peaking, zoom in while filming and heck ML even gives waveforms, etc. How $6000 for firmware and then they leave that out, such basic stuff that even a couple hackers have managed on their own?

Anyway as he says it plays with your mind, it's both worth the price, for those who can afford it which certainly leaves some out, and yet a bit of a rip at the same time. I still wonder if it might not have been better to price it like a DSLR and get their years ahead of everyone and not leave stuff out and take the world by complete storm than the conservative route and wait to price it and move it down when everyone else can already do it as well (or worse if it turns out, better).

Anyway, nice review.

If I recall, it's a bit more than simply the firmware. It has upgrade heatsinks and somewhat overclocked DIGIC processors. I'll grant you, maybe it's not worth $6K, but I'm not really a film-maker and so I half-way ignore all of these cinema stuff other than to get a bit of info from a few reviews, and what's being talked about on this forum. And I live in LA, so with a few of my friends I have no option but to be dragged into those discussions...lol.

853
Sports / Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« on: January 28, 2013, 05:53:11 PM »
I can't help but be amused at the advertising that's come up in this thread. Kinda appropriate...but not really.

854
Sports / Re: Tenpin Bowling
« on: January 28, 2013, 05:19:42 PM »
The other bit that helps, is when scaling down from full size you tend to eliminate more and more of the noise that exists. So full res might not be as kind at such high ISOs, but for web or small print (5x7, maybe 8x10) you often get quite usable shots even at what seems like really high ISO.

I'm actually considering if maybe I want to rally crank my ISO up on my 5d3 past 6400 (I try and not go higher) to get faster shutter speed when I know I'm shooting mostly just for web. Just a bit of de-noising in LR4, and then scale to 1200px long edge eliminates a lot more noise that I realize at the time of shooting.

855
Sports / Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« on: January 28, 2013, 05:13:24 PM »
Your grand niece is very cute with that pony.

One comment, not sure if you're able to, but a fill-flash (preferably a 430EX or 580EX class, or even off camera) would help greatly for riders faces.

Also you're at ISO 400 @/f13, any particular reason you are stopping down so far instead of f/7.1 or f/8 or so? 1/500 is good, but you probably could go faster with ISO100 @f/7.1, and you'd probably get slightly sharper images, since on a crop you tend to (depending on pixel counts) start hitting diffraction limits quicker than full frame.

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