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Messages - CarlTN

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31
Lenses / Re: Canon's f/1.2's: What is really going on?
« on: April 29, 2014, 08:44:32 PM »
I worry about you guys sometimes. I have lenses I must have changed thousands of times and there is no discernible wear.

+1

'Excessive wear on the mounts'??  Even the plastic bayonet mounts on (relatively) low cost lenses are pretty durable, although they'll wear eventually.  The metal bayonet mounts of bodies and most lenses will not wear appreciably even with many years of heavy use.

Oh really?  Ok, so lens mounts on Canon cameras and their lenses, are the only things in existence that do not wear when they come in contact with each other.  That's nice to know.  I'm glad people worry about me, I feel so loved.

Don't be so silly it has got nothing to do with loving, or not, you as a person, it is about erroneous information put out because of speculation, theory, irrationality, bad teaching etc.

 The lenses are designed to go on and off. Mechanical wear is brought on by friction and the heat that causes, there is no heat generated in a 60° rotation and the friction is supplied via a spring specifically put there to do that job. Of course there is a microscopic amount of wear, but it is so minimal the lenses I have mounted thousands, if not tens of thousands of times show none and that is an empirical observation.

I remember when Canon moved the FD mount to the FDn mount, everybody said twisting the lens was a terrible idea and we'd get wear in no time, turns out that wasn't true either, and I do have fd lenses I have mounted tens of thousands of times.

But you said you worried about me.  Sorry just taking you at your word, I'll try to remember to not do that in the future.

It's good to know you have observed no wear after changing lenses thousands of times on the same body.  I don't plan on doing that, myself, nor do I have the need to.  And it's good to know that I can't trust my lying eyes, after seeing the wear I saw on the 1D4 I mentioned, that I rented.  I feel more relaxed now, because I know that camera and lens mounts, are a good case where metal on metal contact, causes no wear.  If the automakers could only learn this, we could drive our cars with no oil in the engine.

32
EOS Bodies / Re: New Sensor Technology Coming From Canon? [CR1]
« on: April 29, 2014, 08:34:23 PM »
Well there you go! The reason the 7D2 has been delayed so long is that it will be a full frame mirrorless dual pixel quad pixel fovenon big megapixel camera with a 1DX build in an EOS-M package.... that will shoot at ISO 819,200 and take 8K video.....

+1 !!  The best part is it will feature a camera and computer monitor built into eyeglasses, since nobody has ever thought of doing that before!  Even harder to believe, but the sensor will be 4x5 inches!  You wear it on your belt, the light is transferred to it via fiber optics that are one trillionth the diameter of a human hair!   

but on a serious (somewhat) note, we now have the technology to make the "Dick Tracey radio wristwatch" with video....

The problem is now, though...Dick Tracey, didn't take pictures of his...well you know.  He only used the technology to fight crime. 

33
Photography Technique / Re: How do I get the whole picture sharp?
« on: April 29, 2014, 08:29:38 PM »

In macro photography, if you want to get your subject completely in focus you should try focus stacking:


Focus stacking is both time consuming, and consumes more storage space, and more processing power.  Using apertures smaller than f/11 can be perfectly acceptable, in practice...especially for shooting an object that is mostly flat, and parallel with the sensor.  If the subject has more depth in the third dimension, that is when focus stacking really makes more sense, and can come into its own.  The question really should be, at what point does the image justify the effort spent for focus stacking?  Is it really required, or is it more an academic exercise?

For example, magazines such as "Nature Photographer", rarely even include landscape images that were shot at wider than f/14 aperture (whether that is always the right philosophy, might be up for debate...but the editor certainly voices their opinion in favor of it, and very often includes it in the text with the image).  In those cases focus distance is not only not in the macro realm, but is usually more than 10 feet from the camera, and on a wider angle lens to boot.  Yet at f/14, the lens is yielding noticeable softening at the pixel level, due to diffraction.  But the 8.5 x 11 full page (or sometimes smaller) prints in the magazine, do not appear soft.  And in most cases, there was no focus stacking.

As photographers, it's our judgment call, based on our experience and our willingness to commit time...as to which technique we use.

34
Lenses / Re: Canon's f/1.2's: What is really going on?
« on: April 29, 2014, 08:16:35 PM »
I worry about you guys sometimes. I have lenses I must have changed thousands of times and there is no discernible wear.

+1

'Excessive wear on the mounts'??  Even the plastic bayonet mounts on (relatively) low cost lenses are pretty durable, although they'll wear eventually.  The metal bayonet mounts of bodies and most lenses will not wear appreciably even with many years of heavy use.

Oh really?  Ok, so lens mounts on Canon cameras and their lenses, are the only things in existence that do not wear when they come in contact with each other.  That's nice to know.  I'm glad people worry about me, I feel so loved.

35
Lenses / Re: Canon's f/1.2's: What is really going on?
« on: April 29, 2014, 03:10:30 PM »
One thing telling, an excellent portrait/wedding photographer in our area, can easily afford any gear.  She uses the ef 50mm 1.4 for some fill-in shots of guests and details at weddings.  I asked her why she didn't go with the L version as she did with every other lens (including the 85mm), and she said she had tried it and decided it just wasn't reliable enough for what she was doing with a 50mm.

She mainly uses the 24-70mm f/2.8 II, the 85mm f/1.2,II  and the 70-200mm /f2.8 IS II.  And you should see how she holds a lens between her knees when swapping out!  Changes lenses faster than anybody I've ever seen.

I wonder how often she has her sensor cleaned.  Admittedly wide aperture images (shot indoors with darker backgrounds) don't show dust spots very easily, which is probably why she's not very cautious about changing lenses so much.  But I wouldn't want to buy anything she sells used, after she's done with it.  You can't change lenses "fast" without putting excessive wear on the mounts.  It's far better to just use more than one camera body, so you can leave lenses in place and switch between them.  She should do this, especially since you say she can afford to purchase whatever she needs.
I agree that two (or more bodies is the way to go if you can afford it.  Also, changing lenses quickly like that is just an accident waiting to happen.  Her luck will run out eventually and that will be a costly mistake.  Also, as you say, dust on the sensor at wide apertures isn't much of an issue, but dust on the lens will spoil the bokeh pretty quickly if there's enough of it and it's big enough.  Not that most people would notice...

Glad we can agree on something... :P !!  Joking...Yes and worst of all, is lens internal dust (you can't clean it).  But as far as mount wear goes...I was especially troubled with the 1D4 body I rented back in 2012.  It had scratches around the mount edges, where other people who had rented it, were in a hurry to change lenses, and apparently they think "1 series bodies are indestructible, lenses are pretty stout too".  I cringe when people abuse gear...And again, I have no desire to ever buy a used camera or lens, from a rental facility!!  I try to buy used gear (which is rare) that is either basically almost brand new, or from other people like me.   

36
Photography Technique / Re: How do I get the whole picture sharp?
« on: April 29, 2014, 03:03:56 PM »
This morning I took this photo with the 100mm L.
Iso 160 - f/13 - 0,5 sec.
Distance about 30 centimetres.
I used a tripod and cable release.
I didn't crop the photo and shot it in raw. Yes, the colour is about that green, that's why I like it.
How is it possible to get everything sharp with this lens even in the corners?


I would have tried closing aperture to f/16 to f/20.  (Also, with this subject and lighting, ISO 50 would be useful.)  The center might get very slightly softer, but the borders and corners get a bit sharper.  Then apply some sharpening in post processing.  Experiment with the radius of the sharpening...and also balance the application of it, with the "detail" slider.  Many times you can have the detail slider above 50 (out of 100), while keeping the sharpening lower.  Other times, not.  To make full use of the detail slider, it's necessary to bring the luminance noise that gets captured, to an absolute minimum...hence my suggestion for using ISO 50.  If you can't go below ISO 100, then use 100.

37
Lenses / Re: Canon's f/1.2's: What is really going on?
« on: April 29, 2014, 02:51:31 PM »
One thing telling, an excellent portrait/wedding photographer in our area, can easily afford any gear.  She uses the ef 50mm 1.4 for some fill-in shots of guests and details at weddings.  I asked her why she didn't go with the L version as she did with every other lens (including the 85mm), and she said she had tried it and decided it just wasn't reliable enough for what she was doing with a 50mm.

She mainly uses the 24-70mm f/2.8 II, the 85mm f/1.2,II  and the 70-200mm /f2.8 IS II.  And you should see how she holds a lens between her knees when swapping out!  Changes lenses faster than anybody I've ever seen.

I wonder how often she has her sensor cleaned.  Admittedly wide aperture images (shot indoors with darker backgrounds) don't show dust spots very easily, which is probably why she's not very cautious about changing lenses so much.  But I wouldn't want to buy anything she sells used, after she's done with it.  You can't change lenses "fast" without putting excessive wear on the mounts.  It's far better to just use more than one camera body, so you can leave lenses in place and switch between them.  She should do this, especially since you say she can afford to purchase whatever she needs.

38
EOS Bodies / Re: New Sensor Technology Coming From Canon? [CR1]
« on: April 29, 2014, 02:42:33 PM »
Well there you go! The reason the 7D2 has been delayed so long is that it will be a full frame mirrorless dual pixel quad pixel fovenon big megapixel camera with a 1DX build in an EOS-M package.... that will shoot at ISO 819,200 and take 8K video.....

+1 !!  The best part is it will feature a camera and computer monitor built into eyeglasses, since nobody has ever thought of doing that before!  Even harder to believe, but the sensor will be 4x5 inches!  You wear it on your belt, the light is transferred to it via fiber optics that are one trillionth the diameter of a human hair!   

39
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $2559
« on: April 25, 2014, 05:09:29 PM »
If anyone wants to save money, they should wait for the holidays, or else wait for a "refurb sale" from Canon USA (and sign up for the updates on canonpricewatch...also consider camel x3 for amazon price updates).  Or you could consider buying used.

I have a feeling the 5D3, full USA model, will sell new at or under $2450, sometime in the holiday season.  And of course it will go well below that, if you factor in lens kit deals (it's already done that this past holiday season).  I wonder just how low it will go?  Also wonder if there will be a 5D4 development announcement sometime in 2015, or before?  Surely there will be a rumor of one in development, if not an announcement.  Of course whatever the next full frame body that gets announced (if it's not the 5D4 replacement), might factor in to the timeline of a replacement.

That is assuming that the refurb store doesn't sell out nearly immediately.  I've had my eye on a couple lenses, but they sell out even before it goes on sale.  I got my 5D3 more than 1.5 years ago for 2500.  I'd rather get one of these gray kits new with a store warranty than buying a used unit from an unknown source.  Who knows why the seller is selling it and if he's being 100% truthful.

The refurb store does not always sell out immediately.  If you don't like buying used, it's your choice.  I don't prefer it either, but I have (and not just photo equipment).  It's worked out fine about 98% of the time, for me.  I've also sold many things used.  Who knows what I've done with my stuff though, I might have used it to dig a ditch!  I mean, who even knows if you are being 100% truthful right now?  All we can do is take people at their word, when dealing with them.  If you choose not to, it might become difficult for you to deal with people, and vice versa.

40
Well if Canon bring a full frame mirrorless camera in 2014, and it does not have major innovation, I will be disappointed.  I don't think we need an "EOS M full frame".  I would prefer to see a new studio 1 series (or 3 series!) with a high performing new sensor.  Would it sell well?  I don't know.  It might be just what studio and fashion shooters have been asking for, especially those that gave up on Canon and started using the D800.  Wedding pros might want it, but they're pretty happy with the 5D3.

41
Are there really two threads going on about this camera's AF pushing 20 pages now? 

Why can't people just agree to disagree, and accept the fact the 6D is a great camera for what it is - an entry level FF body with great IQ but with simplified AF.

Sometimes one tool is better than another based on needs/wants.

To put things in perspective, my SLRs are playing backup to my EOS M at the moment  :o

Actually there appears to be two threads going on.  One is about the 5D3 (the hostile hijacking of the original thread), the other is about the 6D (the original thread).  I've tried to agree to disagree, but that's not always possible.

Unfortunately there is not a satisfactory amount of practical information about specifically the 6D's autofocus, and how best to use it, in this thread.  I've tried to share my impression of its capabilities (and limitations) based on 13 months' experience and 15,000 shutter cycles, on my 6D.  I have used 8 lenses (9 if you count a TC combination) on it over this period of time.  I feel there are a few others who briefly contributed to this thread, that I could learn more from.  But they might have been soured by the thread's hijacking.

As for your DSLR playing backup to an EOS M, I'm not sure why that would be.  Whatever works for you. 

42
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $2559
« on: April 25, 2014, 03:38:00 AM »
If anyone wants to save money, they should wait for the holidays, or else wait for a "refurb sale" from Canon USA (and sign up for the updates on canonpricewatch...also consider camel x3 for amazon price updates).  Or you could consider buying used.

I have a feeling the 5D3, full USA model, will sell new at or under $2450, sometime in the holiday season.  And of course it will go well below that, if you factor in lens kit deals (it's already done that this past holiday season).  I wonder just how low it will go?  Also wonder if there will be a 5D4 development announcement sometime in 2015, or before?  Surely there will be a rumor of one in development, if not an announcement.  Of course whatever the next full frame body that gets announced (if it's not the 5D4 replacement), might factor in to the timeline of a replacement.

43
I bought the Benro, like it a lot.  Used it with a 500 f/4 series 1, and a 200 f/2.  No problems, owned it 3 years now.

I've read that the wrist wrap in Benro C49F is of a cheap quality, is that correct? I know you mentioned that the monopod works great for you, but have you ever contacted Benro for any parts or warranty related issues? Is it easy to deal with their customer support?

No, I've not contacted them.  It turns out mine is the C48F, so my mistake.  It's possible the C49F is not as good, I don't know.  Mine is just 4 sections, like the others you're comparing.  A 5 section monopod, if it is the same height, just might be less rigid, and less strong.  Mine is rated to around 55 pounds, if I recall correctly.

Not really used the wrist strap very much, the quality seems fine to me though.  I really like how the flip locks work, have a nice feel.  Also like the foam grip.  Also, the pivoting foot is quite nice, has just the right amount of resistance...and the foot itself is just the right size...has rough tread on the bottom.  The feel is fairly heavy duty, I get a sense of rigidity.  I suppose there might be better monopods, but they probably cost a bit more, and probably weigh more.  Like I said, no complaints, no reason to call for warranty service.  My cousin that has the 1DX, bought a different brand, and I forget which one it is (might be Induro...but it's probably the Gitzo).  His is of larger diameter (but seems like the weight rating is similar), and the top plate is larger diameter (his top plate seems about 4 inches diameter, but it might be less). 

But the leg sections on his, twist rather than flip to lock, which is quite tedious to deal with...takes a lot longer to extend and retract.  And he still felt his was not heavy duty enough for his series 1 600 f/4L.  I wasn't there when he tried it, so I can't say how it felt.  I've asked if he would let me try it on either his or my monopod again, and he said no...lol.  He is 74 years old, so that is probably a factor with how it felt to him.  He's not weak or small in stature at all, but he's very used to using his 600 on a Wimberly head, on a very heavy duty tripod.

44
I bought the Benro, like it a lot.  Used it with a 500 f/4 series 1, and a 200 f/2.  No problems, owned it 3 years now.

45
Lenses / Re: Canon IS Primes for landscapes?
« on: April 25, 2014, 12:47:28 AM »
Apparently the 24mm has no coma wide open which is ideal for astrophotography.

First I've seen of that.  I thought some of the tests I saw, showed significant coma wide open. 

There are folks out there who "highly recommend" the lens for that purpose.  eg: http://www.lonelyspeck.com/lenses-for-milky-way-photography/

The design includes two aspheric elements which could reduce coma in a decent lens design--but I have no direct experience with the lens or any other Samyang products.  I don't own one, and probably wouldn't buy one for myself since other known issues would eliminate it from consideration relative to what I like to do.

Fair point.  I've only owned one Rokinon lens so far, the 85mm f/1.4.  It held its value very well on the used market, and I lost very little when I sold it.  But it definitely did not have good contrast.  The resolution was ok, and the CA was not too bad.  Certainly not a bad value for money (because it was so inexpensive).  But it was a manual focus / aperture, so it was cumbersome to use...especially since I was only using the standard focusing screen, and this focal length is especially demanding of good manual focus technique, if the lens is manual.  I'm still considering trying the 14mm f/2.8, though.  From what I have seen, it might have the best overall image quality of all the Rokinon focal lengths.  Both the 14mm and the 85mm, cost around half what their 24mm f/1.4 sells for, though, so to me it seems like a poor value...especially given photozone's review.  Not saying people can't take good images with it, though.

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