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Messages - mb66energy

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16
Lenses / Re: First Image of the EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II Lens
« on: November 07, 2014, 03:43:00 AM »
[...]

  7Dii + EF 100-400 L IS USM mark ii

[...]

IMHO, unless you mostly use a tripod, just upgrading to a modern IS lens will massively widen your shooting opportunities. I was sceptical until I did.

In forests I will need a tripod just with an IS equipped lens - 0.5 sec. exposure time @ f/11 and ISO 200 is a typical exp. parameter combination.

But there are other situations where I would like to have a 400mm lens WITH IS. So the new lens might a candidate - your experience confirms my liking of the new lens ...

Best - Michael

(1) Fascinating. What are you shooting?
(2) The super telephoto lenses detect tripods and only use IS to correct mirrorslap - but I find the combination still useful for some subjects, especially the moon and planets.
(3) Why do you stay at ISO 200?

Ad (1): I like scenes in deep forests where you have the play of light and shadows. The shadows are DEEP so I need these long exp. times to get the DOF with a telephoto lens.

Ad (2): That's what I meant with "replacing 70-200 4.0 and 400 5.6": Just having one compact lens which substitutes two lenses I usually carry with me is a great option - if the new 100-400 delivers the quality I like!
It will help me too in situations where I have the tripod NOT with me.

Ad (3): I now shoot with APS-C exclusively - a matter of cost/availability of lenses etc. ISO 200 or a maximum of ISO 800 delivers the quality I want with the equipment I have: 40D / 600D / EOS M .
For bird in Flight ISO 800 - 1600 are fine because freezing the motion adds more detail compared to the detail loss by increased noise/NR - but: The EOS 40D AF is good but 1Dx or 7Dii might be a little bit better - so I haven't tried this field of photography a lot ...

Michael

17
Lenses / Re: First Image of the EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II Lens
« on: November 06, 2014, 08:46:43 AM »
Might replace my EF 4.0 70-200 non-IS and the EF 5.6 400 lenses ?!

Might be part of a good combo:
  EOS M + EF-S 10-22 via adapter (in lens compartment)
  40D or 600D + EF 2.8 40 (in lens compartment too)
  7Dii + EF 100-400 L IS USM mark ii
  EF-S 2.8 60
  2 x TC
all in the slim and smallish Lowe Pro Runner 200 which I really like for smaller gear packs.

EDIT: forgotten the "L" in the lens name ...

IMHO, unless you mostly use a tripod, just upgrading to a modern IS lens will massively widen your shooting opportunities. I was sceptical until I did.

In forests I will need a tripod just with an IS equipped lens - 0.5 sec. exposure time @ f/11 and ISO 200 is a typical exp. parameter combination.

But there are other situations where I would like to have a 400mm lens WITH IS. So the new lens might a candidate - your experience confirms my liking of the new lens ...

Best - Michael

18
Lenses / Re: First Image of the EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II Lens
« on: November 06, 2014, 08:10:04 AM »
Might replace my EF 4.0 70-200 non-IS and the EF 5.6 400 lenses ?!

Might be part of a good combo:
  EOS M + EF-S 10-22 via adapter (in lens compartment)
  40D or 600D + EF 2.8 40 (in lens compartment too)
  7Dii + EF 100-400 L IS USM mark ii
  EF-S 2.8 60
  2 x TC
all in the slim and smallish Lowe Pro Runner 200 which I really like for smaller gear packs.

EDIT: forgotten the "L" in the lens name ...

19
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 7D Mark II Owners first thoughts
« on: November 05, 2014, 11:56:11 AM »
I just shot my first soccer game under stadium lights. All I have to say is Holy Sh*T that Flicker function is amazing   ....   But with the Flicker function and the high ISO I know I chose an awesome upgrade from the 7D.

Here's an example of the Flicker function from a high school football shoot:

This anti-flicker technology is great for sports shooters.  It is in fact amazing, a real practical improvement.  My goodness, this will surely send the 7D2's DxO score through the roof!!!

Oh wait ... never mind.  ;D

I think, the score of 70 published by DxOmark is not through the roof (o.k., it depends on the roof height ...) - just 4 more than the first iteration 5 years ago.
But after looking at the images, the specs and - thanks to all here - the first incoming user based reviews I think this camera will rule for those who need a fast versatile camera (which is at least for me compatible with my lenses).

EDIT: Some haven't perhaps read the corresponding article so FYI:
         http://www.dxomark.com/Reviews/Canon-EOS-7D-Mk-II-review-Low-ISO-performance-lags-behind-rivals

20
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 7D Mark II Owners first thoughts
« on: November 05, 2014, 11:35:42 AM »
I wonder if the 100-400 mkii was developed in tandem with the 7Dii.

I'm just thinking out aloud here as I'm not a technically minded person but would there be boosted performance if this was the case?

I hear that there was collaborative development between the 300 f/2.8 mkii and the TC MKIII and we all know how well they work together.

I think so:
  - ergonomics will profit from a co-development between camera and lens: center of gravity can be optimized,
    protrusions of lens/camera (flash housing) can be optimized (no collisions etc.)
  - lens optics vs. camera hosted sensor including micro lens array
  - software in lens and camera might be work better (= faster, more precise, more accurate) together

Im always intrigued how well all my lenses (from  2.8 24mm non-IS non USM 2.8 40mm STM) work together with an EOS 33 and the EOS M with adaptor so there must be a great interface between lens and camera and both, lens and camera provide the necessary information. But codeveloping opens up higher potentials.

Best - Michael

21
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 7D Mark II Owners first thoughts
« on: November 05, 2014, 11:05:01 AM »
I just shot my first soccer game under stadium lights. All I have to say is Holy Sh*T that Flicker function is amazing   ....   But with the Flicker function and the high ISO I know I chose an awesome upgrade from the 7D.
This is one of the features that I'm most interested in.  Does it seem to affect the shooting speed?  In other words, is the camera timing the lights before taking the shot or does it provide a sort of auto exposure/white balance?


Kathleen

An answer of a hopefully very reliable source:
"If/when flickering of artificial lights is detected, the camera reads the rate of flickering and changes shutter timing in two important ways:

    For single shots, it alters actual shutter lag time, so that the actual firing of the shutter coincides with the instant of maximum “peak” illumination during the flickering cycle of the lighting you’re shooting under.
    For continuous shooting sequences, the fps rate and instant of actual firing for each shot are also altered, depending on the flicker cycling frequency detected. Again, this is to match each successive still image to an instant of maximum illumination of the artificial lights."
(Source: http://learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2014/eos7dmkii_antiflicker.shtml )

It also manages color quality much better than some auto exposure feature -- flourescent tubes e.g. have different phosphors for red, green and blue color which have different delays for emitting their light.

Best - Michael

22
After checking the post of Don, which came up while I was writing ...
True, 40D equals to 26 MPixels for FF sensor size, 600D for roughly 50 MPixels.

My FF compatible lenses perform very well on the 40D and well on the 600D / EOS M so I see headroom up to roughly 50 Megapixels for these lenses at least in the center region of the image and the borders (not the corners perhaps).

I see also the chance that transistions are reproduced better by a higher Pixel count ... not only details.

23
Lenses / Re: DO you correct lens vignetting when sot wide open??
« on: October 30, 2014, 05:11:46 AM »
I see your question as a serious one ;)

Under DPP i corrected it if necessary.
With DxO it is corrected as default.

I will deactivate DxOs default setting to correct vignetting ... because
most images look better with vignetting. It gives the sky a deeper blue,
focuses to the main subject by diminishing the visibility of the border
areas -
except if I need a technically perfect photo of some laboratory
setting or a photo showing a pattern (e.g. autumn leaves on the ground).
And sometimes I use a composition where the main subject is located near
the image borders or corners.

24
Abstract / Re: High resolution Moon image
« on: October 28, 2014, 02:27:07 PM »
Great/Big stuff!

How would it feel to be on the moon and shooting landscapes
and sunrises earthrises?

25
Abstract / Re: Beautiful bokeh! Let me see yours!
« on: October 28, 2014, 02:06:45 PM »
Just these "poor man's workhorses" do fine in the bokeh department, IMO ...

1) 100 2.8 MACRO non-IS @ f/4.0
2) 70-200 4.0 L non-IS @ 200mm, f/8.0, near MFD

That Bee shot is awesome!  Seems like a pretty hard shot to nail.
Agree. Wonderful, well done!

Thanks for your comments!

I checked the file: it was manually focused and only one shot done.
The subject is what we call in german a "Schwebewespe" or literally translated,
a "hoovering wasp". These little animals can stay at the same 3D point
like high quality quadocopters - everything in a mere 50 milligrams package that
doesn't need to recharge a battery on the grid ... wonders of nature!

If you move slowly they stay - I tried to get a nice background by varying the
angle slowly and focusing fine tuning was done by varying the distance to the
"wasp".

The 40D has a very good focusing screen and I was "socialized" with manual focus
cameras in the early 1990ies (the trusty Canon EF) which helped me a lot + I had
some luck to get that shoot too!

(I am really excited by the 7D mark ii which might help to shoot such subjects with
a lot of AF support !)

26
Abstract / Re: Beautiful bokeh! Let me see yours!
« on: October 28, 2014, 10:15:41 AM »
Just these "poor man's workhorses" do fine in the bokeh department, IMO ...

1) 100 2.8 MACRO non-IS @ f/4.0
2) 70-200 4.0 L non-IS @ 200mm, f/8.0, near MFD

27
Lenses / Re: Review: PowerShot G7 X via DXOMark
« on: October 27, 2014, 07:47:27 PM »

The 5D MkII was replaced by the 5D MkIII, and it was a massive upgrade in every respect that the MkII got criticized. Indeed it is probably the best general purpose camera made so far.

How do you think your "landscape work" will benefit from a 50MP 135 format sensor? How does the D810 not fill your needs? Why do you think a 50MP 135 format will touch the IQ in big prints of the 645z medium format 50MP sensor? How does stitching let you down currently?

I know there are a very few photographers out there that will get the best out of a 50MP 135 format sensor, but most of us are kidding ourselves if we think we need it.

When people like Jimmy McIntyre can shoot images like this on a daily basis with a D800 and 60D, and I'll bet you can't tell which is from which without big prints in front of you, I think the 'need' for 50mp is just hype for 99.999% of people.

But I'd love you to prove me wrong..........

IMO 50 MPix have the advantage to dig into an image, e.g. landscape, macro, "townscape" to explore details - one photo for everything. On the other hand I see a strong advantage for the binning of 4 sensor pixels into one RGB image pixel with full color information ...

And this is also true for smaller sensors with better light.

So your 'need' for 50MP is so you don't have to carry a long enough lens for the job (just get a current crop camera to do that, they give you an effective 45MP sensor already), and, to down sample to 12MP to get a colour bit depth no device can replicate or print and the human eye can't discern.

Forgive me if I am not impressed with your arguments.

I'm with Maximilian here, you'd have been better off not hijacking the thread.

No Need to impress someone.

I just like to view images in the above mentioned manner. You haven't understood my point.

Pixel binning for images with red LEDs to avoid artifacts.

No need to call answers of your questions hijacking ...

28
Lenses / Re: Review: PowerShot G7 X via DXOMark
« on: October 27, 2014, 04:34:25 PM »
Canon, do you hear us? We want a 50MP high DR Sony sensor in a 6DII body for 2500$. It doesn't need many focus points, it doesn't need the best low light performance, it doesn't need to be fast. We want many good pixels at ISO64 and an EF mount.

I don't.

What do you need 50mp for in a cheap camera?

So $2500 is a cheap camera???  Anyway, I know exactly what he is looking for...a 2014 version of the 5D2 but with 50Mp for landscape work.

The 5D MkII was replaced by the 5D MkIII, and it was a massive upgrade in every respect that the MkII got criticized. Indeed it is probably the best general purpose camera made so far.

How do you think your "landscape work" will benefit from a 50MP 135 format sensor? How does the D810 not fill your needs? Why do you think a 50MP 135 format will touch the IQ in big prints of the 645z medium format 50MP sensor? How does stitching let you down currently?

I know there are a very few photographers out there that will get the best out of a 50MP 135 format sensor, but most of us are kidding ourselves if we think we need it.

When people like Jimmy McIntyre can shoot images like this on a daily basis with a D800 and 60D, and I'll bet you can't tell which is from which without big prints in front of you, I think the 'need' for 50mp is just hype for 99.999% of people.

But I'd love you to prove me wrong..........

IMO 50 MPix have the advantage to dig into an image, e.g. landscape, macro, "townscape" to explore details - one photo for everything. On the other hand I see a strong advantage for the binning of 4 sensor pixels into one RGB image pixel with full color information ...

And this is also true for smaller sensors with better light.

29
Software & Accessories / Re: Ballhead for Gitzo 2542L
« on: October 27, 2014, 11:59:38 AM »
Just to throw in another option:

http://www.manfrotto.com/hydrostatic-ball-head-with-rc4-rapid-connect-system

I use this one on a SIRUI 3204X and I am very satisfied:
  - very sturdy ball head
  - no visible deviation while fixing the ball after positioning the camera
    with 70-200 + APS-C
  - very low deviation with the 4.6 400 in near horizontal positions
  - the panning is released/locked separately and works VERY smooth - might be usable for
    video but I have to produce a handle to lead the camera well ...

But:
  - choose the exchangeable plate well - I had a lot of RC4s just before I bought that head
  - and is not too compact/light at 730 grams

30
Lenses / Re: Review: PowerShot G7 X via DXOMark
« on: October 27, 2014, 05:40:00 AM »
G7 X seems to be a good move concept-wise but I too observed the not so good corner quality in ONE site, it was  d p re view  if I remember it correctly. We have to wait for more well made comparisons.

For me the G7 isn't interesting - I am very satisfied with the EOS M and the EF 40mm lens via Canon adaptor. It is compact, low weight and delivers great IQ. It's also a movie capable (+ Magic Lantern features) backup camera for my 40D + fits snugly in a lens compartment.

Canon, do you hear us? We want a 50MP high DR Sony sensor in a 6DII body for 2500$. It doesn't need many focus points, it doesn't need the best low light performance, it doesn't need to be fast. We want many good pixels at ISO64 and an EF mount.

Me too! But I would accept a Canon sensor too if it has real 13 bit DR or more ...

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