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Messages - dolina

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346
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: December 03, 2013, 07:48:38 AM »

Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Brown Shrike is a migratory species and ringing studies show that  they have a high fidelity to their wintering sites, often returning to  the same locations each winter.[20][21][22] They begin establishing  wintering territories shortly on arrival and their loud chattering or  rattling calls are distinctive. Birds that arrive early and establish  territories appear to have an advantage over those that arrive later in  the winter areas.[23][24] The timing of their migration is very regular  with their arrival in winter to India in August to September and  departure in April.[25] During their winter period, they go through a  premigratory moult.[20] Their song in the winter quarters is faint and  somewhat resembles the call of the Rosy Starling and often includes  mimicry of other birds. The beak remains closed when singing and only  throat pulsations are visible although the bird moves its tail up and  down while singing.[5][26]

The breeding season is late May or June and the breeding habitat  includes the taiga, forest to semi-desert where they build a nest in a  tree or bush, laying 2-6 eggs.[27]

They feed mainly on insects, especially lepidoptera.[28] Like other  shrikes, they impale prey on thorns.

Small birds and lizards are also  sometimes preyed on.[29] A white-eye (Zosterops) has been recorded in  its larder.[5] They typically look out for prey from a perch and fly  down towards the ground to capture them.[30]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Shrike

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

Settings: 1/400 ƒ/5.6 ISO 2500 800mm

347
EOS Bodies / Re: 5DIV, 7DII and future of upgrades
« on: December 02, 2013, 08:05:59 PM »
I think we should enjoy photography today and keep the rumormongering to the professionals like CR guy. ;)

Kidding aside I am looking forward to future bodies as well.

I need a new toy!  ;D

348
Canon EF Prime Lenses / Re: Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM
« on: November 29, 2013, 01:19:32 PM »
This is a lifer to me.


Untitled  by alabang, on Flickr

The  Oriental Skylark (Alauda gulgula), also known as the Oriental Lark or  Small Skylark, is a species of skylark found in the Indian Subcontinent  and Southeast Asia. Like other skylarks, it is found in open grassland -  often near waterbodies - where it feeds on seeds and insects.

These  skylarks frequently rocket up into the sky, fluttering and singing  before descending down to earth. Male Oriental Skylarks may also hover  in the air and sing, in order to attract a mate.

Oriental  Skylarks are about 16 cm long. They have streaked, yellow-brown upper  plumage, with white outer tail feathers and a short crest. Both sexes  are similar.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_Skylark

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ba%C3%B1os,_Laguna

Settings: 1/200 ƒ/9 ISO 160 800mm

349
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: November 29, 2013, 01:11:00 PM »
Awesome images everyone!


Untitled by alabang, on Flickr

The Oriental Skylark (Alauda gulgula), also known as the Oriental Lark or Small Skylark, is a species of skylark found in the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Like other skylarks, it is found in open grassland - often near waterbodies - where it feeds on seeds and insects.

These skylarks frequently rocket up into the sky, fluttering and singing before descending down to earth. Male Oriental Skylarks may also hover in the air and sing, in order to attract a mate.

Oriental Skylarks are about 16 cm long. They have streaked, yellow-brown upper plumage, with white outer tail feathers and a short crest. Both sexes are similar.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_Skylark

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ba%C3%B1os,_Laguna

Settings: 1/200 ƒ/9 ISO 160 800mm

350
EOS Bodies / Re: Two New Full Frame Cameras in 2014? [CR1]
« on: November 28, 2013, 09:08:06 AM »
Looking forward to this. I hope they slot above the 5D Mark III. Looking forward to unload my two 7D and 5D Mark II.

351
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: November 24, 2013, 12:31:26 PM »
Remix... same EXIF as above but recropped.


Spotted Wood Kingfisher (Actenoides lindsayi) by alabang, on Flickr

352
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: November 24, 2013, 09:29:01 AM »
Thoughts for the day:

As many of you may have seen online or on the telly the Philippines got hit really bad by a Category 5 Super Typhoon by the name of Haiyan/Yolanda.

The mayhem, destruction and death has really weighed on me for the past two weeks.

Just makes you wonder what the future holds for everyone with this being the most deadly Typhoon in the history of my country.
True ... but most people think about such things only when disasters like these happen and eventually forget about it ... but we can do our little bit on a day to day basis that could make the recovery from these disasters a lot faster  ... e.g. in many Asian countries (especially in India) millions of people throw away plastic bags which eventually find their way into the drains that choke up the outlets of the drains into the sea ... what this does during heavy rains or when there are disasters like these is, the water on the streets builds up without any way to recede (due to the outlets being clogged with plastic bags) ... as we all know stagnant water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes and diseases ... every year far too many people (who actually survived deadly desasters) die due to sicknesses that could have been prevented in the first place with just a little discipline. The worst part about this is that its not just the uneducated who throw plastic bags, even the educated do it. I know we cannot stop disasters like these deadly typhoons but a little effort on our part, ona daily basis, will go a long way in the recovery process. Every year during monsoons (rainy season) we go on awareness campaigns to educate people on proper disposal of plastic bags, but its just a very small drop in the ocean.
Almost forgot, very nice image of the Cattle Egret.
Cheers

For this most deadly of all Typhoons plastics and other rubbish played little part in the flooding within the city of Tacloban and other places. The one-minute sustained winds of 315 km/h (196 mph) were reported and water from the storm surge were seen to be higher than 3 m (10 feet) as far in land as 2 km (1.25 miles) from the shore line.

Rubbish and other human obstructions plays a part in other typhoons but this is way way different.
Where did I say rubbish and other human obstructions played a part in this typhoon? Let me re-quote what I said for your ease of reference: "I know we cannot stop disasters like these deadly typhoons but a little effort on our part, on a daily basis, will go a long way in the recovery process".

Dude, seriously? Forgot, this is the Internet.

353
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: November 23, 2013, 11:18:06 PM »
Thoughts for the day:

As many of you may have seen online or on the telly the Philippines got hit really bad by a Category 5 Super Typhoon by the name of Haiyan/Yolanda.

The mayhem, destruction and death has really weighed on me for the past two weeks.

Just makes you wonder what the future holds for everyone with this being the most deadly Typhoon in the history of my country.
True ... but most people think about such things only when disasters like these happen and eventually forget about it ... but we can do our little bit on a day to day basis that could make the recovery from these disasters a lot faster  ... e.g. in many Asian countries (especially in India) millions of people throw away plastic bags which eventually find their way into the drains that choke up the outlets of the drains into the sea ... what this does during heavy rains or when there are disasters like these is, the water on the streets builds up without any way to recede (due to the outlets being clogged with plastic bags) ... as we all know stagnant water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes and diseases ... every year far too many people (who actually survived deadly desasters) die due to sicknesses that could have been prevented in the first place with just a little discipline. The worst part about this is that its not just the uneducated who throw plastic bags, even the educated do it. I know we cannot stop disasters like these deadly typhoons but a little effort on our part, ona daily basis, will go a long way in the recovery process. Every year during monsoons (rainy season) we go on awareness campaigns to educate people on proper disposal of plastic bags, but its just a very small drop in the ocean.
Almost forgot, very nice image of the Cattle Egret.
Cheers

For this most deadly of all Typhoons plastics and other rubbish played little part in the flooding within the city of Tacloban and other places. The one-minute sustained winds of 315 km/h (196 mph) were reported and water from the storm surge were seen to be higher than 3 m (10 feet) as far in land as 2 km (1.25 miles) from the shore line.

Rubbish and other human obstructions plays a part in other typhoons but this is way way different.

354
Canon EF Prime Lenses / Re: Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM
« on: November 23, 2013, 11:20:17 AM »

Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) by alabang, on Flickr

The Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) is a cosmopolitan species of heron (family Ardeidae) found in the tropics, subtropics and warm temperate zones. It is the only member of the monotypic genus Bubulcus, although some authorities regard its two subspecies as full species, the Western Cattle Egret and the Eastern Cattle Egret. Despite the similarities in plumage to the egrets of the genus Egretta, it is more closely related to the herons of Ardea. Originally native to parts of Asia, Africa and Europe, it has undergone a rapid expansion in its distribution and successfully colonised much of the rest of the world.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle_Egret

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ba%C3%B1os,_Laguna

Settings: 1/800 ƒ/8 ISO 160 800mm

===========

Thoughts for the day:

As many of you may have seen online or on the telly the Philippines got hit really bad by a Category 5 Super Typhoon by the name of Haiyan/Yolanda.

The mayhem, destruction and death has really weighed on me for the past two weeks.

Just makes you wonder what the future holds for everyone with this being the most deadly Typhoon in the history of my country.

355
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: November 23, 2013, 11:11:57 AM »

Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) by alabang, on Flickr

The Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) is a cosmopolitan species of heron (family Ardeidae) found in the tropics, subtropics and warm temperate zones. It is the only member of the monotypic genus Bubulcus, although some authorities regard its two subspecies as full species, the Western Cattle Egret and the Eastern Cattle Egret. Despite the similarities in plumage to the egrets of the genus Egretta, it is more closely related to the herons of Ardea. Originally native to parts of Asia, Africa and Europe, it has undergone a rapid expansion in its distribution and successfully colonised much of the rest of the world.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle_Egret

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ba%C3%B1os,_Laguna

Settings: 1/800 ƒ/8 ISO 160 800mm

===========

Thoughts for the day:

As many of you may have seen online or on the telly the Philippines got hit really bad by a Category 5 Super Typhoon by the name of Haiyan/Yolanda.

The mayhem, destruction and death has really weighed on me for the past two weeks.

Just makes you wonder what the future holds for everyone with this being the most deadly Typhoon in the history of my country.

356
EOS Bodies / Re: New EOS-1 in 2014 [CR1]
« on: November 20, 2013, 08:56:17 AM »
The 1D X marked its 25th month and I am sorely looking forward to its replacement next year.

357
My uncle Gerry lives in Tacloban, Philippines and survived Category 5 Supertyphoon Yolanda/Haiyan. He chose to stay to clean up and rebuild.

These photos were taken by him early today, Tuesday, November 19, 2013.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151791836731009.1073741908.249388896008&type=1

All your help is appreciated. The Visayas thanks you.

Follow or add him on Facebook (he accepts almost everyone) to have a 1st hand account on day to day recovery of our city.

358
Lenses / Re: Things to get when you purchase a 600mm?
« on: November 16, 2013, 07:55:57 PM »
In HK my dealer quoted me 90,000 HKD for a 600mm. I have a feeling given enough time you can find one going for 86,000 HKD somewhere.

Get a lenscoat. My preference is black as there is a rebellion problem in the Philippines. You dont want them to think you're military. No more need for a hoodie the Series II Super Teles has a great lens cap.

Get a replacement lens foot from shops like RRS, Kirk, 4th Gen Design, Naturescapes, etc

Get a proper tripod head and tripod legs like those from 4th Gen Design half gimbal, Whimberly full gimbal and Gitzo Series 4

359
Portrait / Youth
« on: November 16, 2013, 10:33:32 AM »

Youth by alabang, on Flickr

Settings: 1/100 ƒ/2.8 ISO 4000 100mm

360
Lenses / Re: Lots of New Lenses Coming in 2014 [CR2]
« on: November 10, 2013, 12:16:31 PM »
L primes please. No more cinema lenses.

Naturally excluding a 200/2 and 800/5.6 replacements. ;)

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