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Messages - Tabor Warren Photography

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31
My wife threw away one of my shoes once. Keep in mind, ONE of my shoes. The other was found underneath the bed a couple of days later. Luckily, we both run the business so hopefully at least our equipment is safe.  :D

Cheers!
-Tabor

32
My wife threw away one of my shoes once. Keep in mind, ONE of my shoes. The other was found underneath the bed a couple of days later. Luckily, we both run the business so hopefully at least our equipment is safe.  :D

Cheers!
-Tabor

33
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon EOS 5D Mark III w/24-105 f/4L IS $2899
« on: October 06, 2014, 09:22:59 PM »
I just bought a 5Diii through BVI and had an awesome experience. It even came with the USA warranty cards. I wouldn't think twice about buying from them again.

Cheers!
-Tabor

34
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: One is the loneliest number...
« on: October 01, 2014, 11:32:08 PM »
I have two 5d3s with me on any and every gig. One has a 24 or 35 on with a 600EX, the other has the 85 or 70-200 on with a 600EX. We also bought another 5D3 to go alongside our second shooter's 5D2. I find it extremely handy to have two bodies on at any time. We carry our equipment around with double-harness Black Rapid Straps which are also extremely handy to have when carrying two bodies.

All that being said, I don't believe you will need two bodies for landscape. Instead, I would invest those dollars into either a supreme camera body or awesome glass.

I mainly shoot weddings, portraits of various types, and corporate events. I have found two bodies to be extremely useful during those times, however, on the rare occasion I shoot landscape, I take an extra lens and keep the second body behind.

I hope this helps!

Cheers,
-Tabor

35
Photography Technique / Re: Can Recommend Ready made website
« on: October 01, 2014, 10:30:07 AM »
I use a wordpress layout designed by elegant themes for my primary site, http://photosbytabor.com. After years of SEOing I have finally cracked page 1 of Google for practically every category. You will also find a gallery link to my other site which is through SmugMug. I use the two different sites to keep my primary site fast(er), but still display full galleries for people to view. If this is an option you were looking into, I would recommend it.

You can find my gallery site at; http://photosbytabor.smugmug.com

I hope this helps!

Cheers,
-Tabor

I like the first one more (http://photosbytabor.com), I was thinking of more or less the same thing. Did you use smugmug for this? (i am a bit confuse)

Thanks.

I used Smugmug for the gallery site, http://photosbytabor.smugmug.com and pay them a ton of money each year, but I also sell enough prints that it is worth it to have them host the images.

My main website, http://photosbytabor.com I created using the ePhoto theme which was coded by a company called Elegant Themes who create themes for Wordpress sites. It is hosted through Host Gator, (who I am not thrilled with, but their inexpensive).

Cheers,
-Tabor

36
Photography Technique / Re: Can Recommend Ready made website
« on: September 30, 2014, 11:07:05 PM »
I use a wordpress layout designed by elegant themes for my primary site, http://photosbytabor.com. After years of SEOing I have finally cracked page 1 of Google for practically every category. You will also find a gallery link to my other site which is through SmugMug. I use the two different sites to keep my primary site fast(er), but still display full galleries for people to view. If this is an option you were looking into, I would recommend it.

You can find my gallery site at; http://photosbytabor.smugmug.com

I hope this helps!

Cheers,
-Tabor

37
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon EOS-1D X Body $4799
« on: September 28, 2014, 10:45:12 PM »
If it helps ease the nerves of anyone cautious about ordering from GetItDigital, I have ordered from them multiple times as well as 6ave, BigValueInc, 1080photo, and a few others. Each transaction has been wonderful, especially my recent 5Diii purchase from BVI.

Sometimes I receive a US Warranty card, sometimes not, but always incredible condition.

Cheers,
-Tabor

38
Lighting / Re: Speedlites - How many are enough?
« on: September 26, 2014, 10:46:51 PM »
Just ONE more...  ;D

In more seriousness, I got by with one for a long time, was excited about having two, (I always shoot with two bodies), now I have three, (though one is a 430ii), and I'll be buying another 600 as well as a couple of Einsteins per RL's suggestion. I think of RL as the lighting guru, so I would heed his advice when it's given.

Cheers,
-Tabor

39
Canon General / Re: Gets the Job Done....Every Time
« on: September 23, 2014, 02:40:42 PM »
Excellent post.

I own a good amount of Canon gear, only used a Nikon once, and the button layout was confusing. That being said, had I begun with Nikon, Sony, whoever, I'm sure the Canon layout would have felt very foreign.

It always cracks me up when wedding guests attempt to one-up the superiority of their xyz system over the gear I'm using. If theirs has better DR, autofocus, MP, whatever, that's cool, I like my Canons.

I often mention to clients that the debate is similar to the superiority of Ford, Chevy, and Dodge in the truck world. They all make excellent machines, I just happen to own an F150.

Thank you for the refreshing, real world, take on the different systems. It is good to know at least some one has done the experimenting.  ;D

Cheers,
-Tabor

40
What gear will they shoot with?
Is this their full time occupation?


Not sure I understand why these two items would be important at all?

Who cares what gear they have if you like the pictures?  The final product is all that matters to the customer.  If you like the final product that the photographer produced in other weddings, you will probably like the final product for your wedding.  A photographer can have the latest, most expensive gear, but if you don't like their final product, that photographer is not right for your wedding  -- regardless of the gear.

The same applies to the second item.  Who cares if it is their full time or part time employment -- if you like the type of photographs the photographer takes?  This is why it is so important to carefully review past work.  A full time photographer can take photographs you don't like just as easily as a part time photographer... and vice versa. 

There are so many more important considerations when selecting a wedding photographer.  A wedding photographer is a business of which taking pictures is but one aspect the customer is paying for. Which gear they use and whether they do this full time or part time are not, in my opinion, high on the list.

Past performance is.   And past performance is independent of gear and employment status.

Do you like the way this particular photographer shoots weddings?  There is no such thing as a good wedding photographer.  Only wedding photographers that are good for a specific customer.  Not all wedding photographers the same and it is important to choose one that is right for your wedding.  A wedding photographer that worked well for one wedding may not work well for yours.  It is a personal service.  That's the advantage of hiring a professional.

I think as time goes on, we will be seeing fewer photographers that can exist solely on wedding photography.  I think the part time photographer will be becoming more common as the industry continues to be over saturated. I, personally, would not discriminate against a photographer solely on the fact they have another job (whether photography is the primary or secondary job).

I will discriminate past on past performance.

there are a couple relevant answers to the gear question - Gear is just too all inclusive but asking if they have backup systems (aka 2 bodies) is important.  No one wants their primary camera to die on the day of a wedding, but, even with a top of the line camera sh!t happens.  So does the photographer have a backup camera is a very important Q.

Full time vs part time - this can also be important, of course it does not truly make a difference - but - it may be a psychological reassurance - a full time, established photog whon't just take the money and run for instance.  But also, turn around time.  If your full time gig is photography your turn around times may be a bit different than someone who shoots weddings on the side while also working a full time job (40 hours a week punching the clock somewhere else means that's 40 hours of the week that they are not working on your wedding!)

As Chuck mentioned, gear and full/part time occupation play a role in the whole process. I know this because I went from a T1i, 17-40L, and 430EXii to dual 5Diiis with a third in the bag, tons of L glass, two 600EX's and upgraded by way of the 60D, 7D, and 5Dii along the way. My first wedding was decent, but I'm happy to say that I have come a long way in both talent and gear. I know that the gear is not everything, but it does reflect at least a partial amount of the investment the photographer is willing to make in their clients. There is a less expensive option to everything I own, but knowing that the 5Diii does better than the 60D (in my opinion) and the 85 f/1.2L ii does better than the 85 f/1.8 in portrait stills (in my opinion), tells me that if I want the best for my client, I buy the best. Gear, will definitely have an impact in the outcome of the work. Someone can always just buy the same setup as me without having to work their way up, and then it goes back to whether or not someone likes the portfolios they have to offer. We all have to start somewhere, and I covered expectations with my first wedding client extensively prior to taking the gig, but I also know that asking what gear they are shooting with is a valid question.

To answer your question about full/part time relevance, I used to shoot part time. I spent 4 years of undergrad and my first year at the college of veterinary medicine shooting part time. Exams matter. I hated having to put edits on the back burner, or having to rush through them to get them done in a reasonable amount of time, but if I had to study, I had to study. Even during the summers when I was working full time or part time in the winters, I had to be at work. It took my turn around time further than it would have if I was a full time photographer. Now, my wife and I have ventured into photography full time and have the capability of turning edits around faster, all while doing a better job than we had before. We have even hired a third photographer/editor, another editor, and an album designer. If I am backed up editing one wedding, another person can take it, I give the final proofing, and we can deliver in weeks instead of months. Yes, the part-time portfolio can and should look great, but my best work was done with May weddings, right after school, and just before I started full time in June. If I booked someone for Fall, I let them know the timing I would be working with. Having been there, I also find full/part time photographer status to also be important.

Cheers,
-Tabor

Is the couple personable, friendly, experienced, and do they take the kinds of images that emote the feeling the couple is looking for? Those are the questions that need to be brought to the forthright.

If a couple cares about the kind of 85mm lens being used, well that's downright silly and tells me they're looking for the wrong qualities in the photographer. I wouldn't shoot their wedding if that were the case. That example is much different from your broader point of "does the photographer have professional gear" - which is a valid expectation.

Further, whether the photographer shoots part-time or full-time is also somewhat irrelevant, provided that the turn around dates are discussed and agreed upon and the other aspects of their work are found worthy.

Surely, these points can be discussed in a sit-down meeting with a client, but it seems strange to expect a couple to care about what aperture the photographer's lenses shoot at.

Since the dslr world seems to be expanding by the minute, I have had more and more clients ask about the gear being used. You are correct in saying, 'what aperture 85mm lens do you use?' is a silly question, however, asking about the gear is completely relevant. My exact question was, "What gear will they shoot with?" everyone seems to have the internet and if you're down to the final two photographers, and find out one is shooting with a $300 dslr and the other is using a $3,000 dslr, the likelihood is that they would feel more comfortable with the better camera being used.

Also, if they don't care when their photos are delivered, then it is a perfect scenario for the part time photographer. My first wedding took me about 2 months to edit. I could have made it happen in less time but was a full time student, full time employee, and part time (in all my free time) photographer. I could have done the edits in less time, heck I could have done them in a week, but would have sacrificed the meticulous editing that I was doing to give them the best product. If she does not ask about their occupational status, that is fine, but it is silly to think that it would not play some sort of role in the final outcome, be that quality, consistency, timeliness, etc.

Lastly, "Is the couple personable, friendly, experienced, and do they take the kinds of images that emote the feeling the couple is looking for?" Also, valid questions.

Cheers,
-Tabor

41
What gear will they shoot with?
Is this their full time occupation?


Not sure I understand why these two items would be important at all?

Who cares what gear they have if you like the pictures?  The final product is all that matters to the customer.  If you like the final product that the photographer produced in other weddings, you will probably like the final product for your wedding.  A photographer can have the latest, most expensive gear, but if you don't like their final product, that photographer is not right for your wedding  -- regardless of the gear.

The same applies to the second item.  Who cares if it is their full time or part time employment -- if you like the type of photographs the photographer takes?  This is why it is so important to carefully review past work.  A full time photographer can take photographs you don't like just as easily as a part time photographer... and vice versa. 

There are so many more important considerations when selecting a wedding photographer.  A wedding photographer is a business of which taking pictures is but one aspect the customer is paying for. Which gear they use and whether they do this full time or part time are not, in my opinion, high on the list.

Past performance is.   And past performance is independent of gear and employment status.

Do you like the way this particular photographer shoots weddings?  There is no such thing as a good wedding photographer.  Only wedding photographers that are good for a specific customer.  Not all wedding photographers the same and it is important to choose one that is right for your wedding.  A wedding photographer that worked well for one wedding may not work well for yours.  It is a personal service.  That's the advantage of hiring a professional.

I think as time goes on, we will be seeing fewer photographers that can exist solely on wedding photography.  I think the part time photographer will be becoming more common as the industry continues to be over saturated. I, personally, would not discriminate against a photographer solely on the fact they have another job (whether photography is the primary or secondary job).

I will discriminate past on past performance.

there are a couple relevant answers to the gear question - Gear is just too all inclusive but asking if they have backup systems (aka 2 bodies) is important.  No one wants their primary camera to die on the day of a wedding, but, even with a top of the line camera sh!t happens.  So does the photographer have a backup camera is a very important Q.

Full time vs part time - this can also be important, of course it does not truly make a difference - but - it may be a psychological reassurance - a full time, established photog whon't just take the money and run for instance.  But also, turn around time.  If your full time gig is photography your turn around times may be a bit different than someone who shoots weddings on the side while also working a full time job (40 hours a week punching the clock somewhere else means that's 40 hours of the week that they are not working on your wedding!)

As Chuck mentioned, gear and full/part time occupation play a role in the whole process. I know this because I went from a T1i, 17-40L, and 430EXii to dual 5Diiis with a third in the bag, tons of L glass, two 600EX's and upgraded by way of the 60D, 7D, and 5Dii along the way. My first wedding was decent, but I'm happy to say that I have come a long way in both talent and gear. I know that the gear is not everything, but it does reflect at least a partial amount of the investment the photographer is willing to make in their clients. There is a less expensive option to everything I own, but knowing that the 5Diii does better than the 60D (in my opinion) and the 85 f/1.2L ii does better than the 85 f/1.8 in portrait stills (in my opinion), tells me that if I want the best for my client, I buy the best. Gear, will definitely have an impact in the outcome of the work. Someone can always just buy the same setup as me without having to work their way up, and then it goes back to whether or not someone likes the portfolios they have to offer. We all have to start somewhere, and I covered expectations with my first wedding client extensively prior to taking the gig, but I also know that asking what gear they are shooting with is a valid question.

To answer your question about full/part time relevance, I used to shoot part time. I spent 4 years of undergrad and my first year at the college of veterinary medicine shooting part time. Exams matter. I hated having to put edits on the back burner, or having to rush through them to get them done in a reasonable amount of time, but if I had to study, I had to study. Even during the summers when I was working full time or part time in the winters, I had to be at work. It took my turn around time further than it would have if I was a full time photographer. Now, my wife and I have ventured into photography full time and have the capability of turning edits around faster, all while doing a better job than we had before. We have even hired a third photographer/editor, another editor, and an album designer. If I am backed up editing one wedding, another person can take it, I give the final proofing, and we can deliver in weeks instead of months. Yes, the part-time portfolio can and should look great, but my best work was done with May weddings, right after school, and just before I started full time in June. If I booked someone for Fall, I let them know the timing I would be working with. Having been there, I also find full/part time photographer status to also be important.

Cheers,
-Tabor

42
Hi Gino,

I tend to agree with private, and would also recommend hiring two different people. I have worked with a ton of videographers and those who specialize in video tend to produce better videos (from my experience). Similarly, we shoot a ton of weddings and are often asked if we can also do video. My answer is always the same, we have the equipment for it, but until we can provide a top-notch product, I will not be including video as one of our options. I think some simply see the dollar signs and jump into both fields because they can, which I find to be unfortunate. All of that being said, however, St. Paul may have someone who can do both, and do them well.

I would also reflect what Private said about the amount of time needed. Though I'm sure you are aware of the amount of time it takes, the phrasing could potentially be a turn off for the photographer/videographer, but she can ask for 5-6 hours of coverage without stepping on toes.

Regarding the meeting, I have had 64 meetings with potential wedding clients and have booked 61 of them. I love meetings. Often times, the folks I am meeting with will not have any questions for me, which is okay. I will then ask them more about their day and help bounce possible ideas necessary to make their day spectacular. Some of the things she may want to consider;

Is she having a first glance?
Is she having a 'grand exit'? if so, what time?
Would she rather have one or two photographers?
Will she receive a print release? What size can she print?
How many photos will they edit for her?
Can she view any FULL galleries?
If she does have to order prints over a certain size through them, how much are they?
How long until she receives her images back?
How are their reviews from TheKnot, Wedding Wire, Facebook, etc?
What gear will they shoot with?
Is this their full time occupation?

For videos and photos alike, I would recommend she take the time to watch a ton of videos from a particular company, if she likes their style then go with them. Similarly, with photos, look into their full galleries and look to see if she likes the style and coverage of their images.

Lastly, I fly around for weddings and Tulsa to St. Paul is less than a $500 fare when I checked a random date in March... there is always the option to fly someone in as well.  :)

Cheers,
-Tabor


43
Lighting / Re: How to Extend Flash Performance (Life on Site)
« on: September 19, 2014, 11:15:36 AM »
I found it! Wow, only slightly embarrassing.  ;D

Thank you all! Private, thank you very much for the diagram.  :)

Cheers!
-Tabor

44
Lighting / Re: How to Extend Flash Performance (Life on Site)
« on: September 19, 2014, 01:14:59 AM »
Thank you all!!!

I did an immense amount of research on each product suggested and believe the best option for me would be 2 Einsteins + VML's as well as 3 Godox pb960's.

Now for the lighting newb question;

I noticed the cable for the Godox system ends in a goofy, little, flat, 3 opening piece which I cannot seem to figure out how in the heck it would fit onto the 600Ex.

Am I missing something, or is it coming with the wrong cable?

I keep looking for a different one, but that goofy flat thing keeps popping up.

Thank you all again!
-Tabor

45
Photography Technique / Re: Square or not?
« on: September 17, 2014, 09:47:33 PM »
...the majority of the people are saying square. Do you want to make your art according to what the majority would do?

This was my take on the subject.

If you are wanting to use the image to please others, (selling the image), I would consider square to potentially sell more.

If you are keeping it as a photo for your own personal gallery, (desktop background, etc.) then whatever you want.

For my taste, I would square it up. I rarely ever intentionally do an edit by going against what I think is right. Though I want more gigs in life, I have to stay true to myself so as to not get lost in the business stand point. With that, however  you feel is the right answer.

Since you posted the square one first, and it looked great to my, square is where I think it should be.

Cheers!
-Tabor

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