August 20, 2014, 06:51:05 AM

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Messages - privatebydesign

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31
Lighting / Re: speedlite 270ex - broken?
« on: August 13, 2014, 08:44:59 AM »
What Dekaner says, it will be the "Wireless" setting, it needs to be OFF.

32
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 1dx vs Nikon d810
« on: August 12, 2014, 10:46:42 PM »
To compare sharpness you have to normalise to the same size, you can't look at the same 100% enlargement as the Nikon will be enlarged much more.

Reduce the Nikon to the same size as the Canon and then compare sharpness, this is comparing 101.

33
Your story of a written off lens is yet another example of why I won't use "protective" filters.

34
Canon General / Re: Another Canon Medium Format Mention
« on: August 12, 2014, 07:29:45 PM »
Ah, sorry Lee Jay, that makes more sense.

35
Canon General / Re: Another Canon Medium Format Mention
« on: August 12, 2014, 06:25:39 PM »
Just out of interest, what flashes are you using at 1/1600 sync?


Schneider Kreuznach  has some 1/1600th second sync leaf shutter lenses for the PhaseOne system. They are apparently extremely good...I think the price starts at around six grand for a 28mm prime.

You might find this article insightful:

http://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/why-leaf-shutter-lenses-matter/


No, I wasn't interested in the shutter, I have been shooting leaf shutter lenses since the mid seventies, I was interested in what flash puts out a decent amount of usable power in under 1/1600 sec.

Leaf shutters are often held up as some kind of golden bullet, especially here, but they have all sorts of their own issues (I own four) and what people seem to fail to grasp is that flash duration at decent power levels is normally much longer than 1/1600.


I measured my 580ex flashes at 1/800th for full power, so that would likely be a tad over half power at 1/1600th.


There is no way you are getting GN58 at 1/800 from a 580EX, my experience is losing just over one stop, so a little underr 1/2 power once you go over sync, then one stop loss per shutter speed increase, which makes sense because you get half as many pulses in half the time.

So for a 1/250 sync with a single speedlite in HSS I get < 1/2 power at 1/320th, then <1/4 power at 1/640, and <1/8 @ 1/1200.

36
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: DXO uh-oh?
« on: August 12, 2014, 02:46:17 PM »
On the 1Ds MkIII that feature came with FW 1.1.2 in April 2008. Don't know about any other bodies.

37
Canon General / Re: Another Canon Medium Format Mention
« on: August 12, 2014, 01:00:53 PM »
Just out of interest, what flashes are you using at 1/1600 sync?


Schneider Kreuznach  has some 1/1600th second sync leaf shutter lenses for the PhaseOne system. They are apparently extremely good...I think the price starts at around six grand for a 28mm prime.

You might find this article insightful:

http://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/why-leaf-shutter-lenses-matter/


No, I wasn't interested in the shutter, I have been shooting leaf shutter lenses since the mid seventies, I was interested in what flash puts out a decent amount of usable power in under 1/1600 sec.

Leaf shutters are often held up as some kind of golden bullet, especially here, but they have all sorts of their own issues (I own four) and what people seem to fail to grasp is that flash duration at decent power levels is normally much longer than 1/1600.


As I understand it, the higher sync speed allows you to shoot, with flash, at MUCH faster apertures in brighter ambient light than you are normally able to with slower sync speeds. If you read the article I linked, it becomes pretty clear why people want a high flash sync and how they use it.


Yes, I know all that and it wasn't the answer to my question, which was pretty simple, what flash is R Gomez using when he is syncing at 1/1600.

More specifically I'd like to know which flash model so I can look up the t1 time and look at the duration at various power settings. It would be nice to know the specific leaf shutter lenses he is using so we can work out the effective second aperture too. I don't want more links, just an answer to a simple question.

38
Canon General / Re: Another Canon Medium Format Mention
« on: August 12, 2014, 11:58:00 AM »
Just out of interest, what flashes are you using at 1/1600 sync?


Schneider Kreuznach  has some 1/1600th second sync leaf shutter lenses for the PhaseOne system. They are apparently extremely good...I think the price starts at around six grand for a 28mm prime.

You might find this article insightful:

http://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/why-leaf-shutter-lenses-matter/


No, I wasn't interested in the shutter, I have been shooting leaf shutter lenses since the mid seventies, I was interested in what flash puts out a decent amount of usable power in under 1/1600 sec.

Leaf shutters are often held up as some kind of golden bullet, especially here, but they have all sorts of their own issues (I own four) and what people seem to fail to grasp is that flash duration at decent power levels is normally much longer than 1/1600.

39
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: DXO uh-oh?
« on: August 12, 2014, 11:50:06 AM »
One of the nicest FW upgrades Canon did to the 1Ds MkIII enabled the joystick to adjust AF point without pressing any other button first, I really like that feature.

40
Canon General / Re: Another Canon Medium Format Mention
« on: August 11, 2014, 11:19:35 PM »
Just out of interest, what flashes are you using at 1/1600 sync?

41
Business of Photography/Videography / Re: Who owns the photo?
« on: August 11, 2014, 04:52:46 PM »
My understanding is if the photographer instigated the scenario then he owns the copyright regardless who takes it.

As an assistant i have shot many frames that were used for commercial purposes.. and I was happy to. I was only getting paid assistant rates not getting any of the bigger creative usage fees. Sometimes it was as simple as pressing the shutter for a still life which the photographer had directed and I set up, this was fairly common practice in the 80s and 90s when using 5x4 & 10x8 cameras. The Assistant basically did everything while the photographer directed everything and talked to the art directors and sometimes models while I shot the frames.
On some occasions I have shot more 'freeform' using my framing / timing  and judgement when the photographer is busy consulting with AD's or feels its in his interests to be taking care of something else on the shoot wind machine etc.

Plus there are many photographers that often don't shoot the actual shot themselves - Many fashion photographers, car photographers are as I mentioned busy doing other tasks that bring the shoot together more than pressing the shutter.
Terry Richardson, often gets his assistants to shoot as he directs and engages with the models (this is a mild way of putting it if you know his work!!!!) Plus the models often have shot kinda selfies of themselves with Terry .

Thesedays on still life shoots I often get assistants to shoot for me while I move lights and reflectors around, as its quicker and better me doing this than taking time to describe to assistant exactly what to do.

Wedding photographers often employ assistants / interns and get them to run around shooting 2nd cam reportage work. This is normally all part of the industry and great experience and learning to the assistants.

Now .. did the monkey happily gain from this experience ? In some sense I would think it was at least stimulating to it - did he understand the situation that anything he shot would be used and creative credit taken by the photographer .. of course not!

But I firmly believe that the photographer had sufficient input and insight to let the monkey take the camera and see what happens which is a creative decision to me.

Many artists don't produce certain aspects of their work, many sculptors and fine artists employ arttist assistants and technicians to actually craft certain or all parts of their artworks.
Do architects build the building.. ?
Many more examples

Your understanding is wrong. Every one of your scenarios, where you are a second shooter, where your assistants shoot for you, artists assistants etc all sign away any rights they might be granted under the law when they work under contract to the employer.

So take these scenarios, your camera is stolen but it is found a month later, some funny guy took it on holiday with him and took photos of a garden ornament all over the world, do you own the copyright? Of course not.

You leave your camera as a remote camera in the woods with a trigger, somebody moves it and takes a different shot to the one you had set up, do you own the copyright? No, you do not.

You leave your camera in the woods by accident, a branch falls on it and just presses the shutter button, do you own the copyright? No, you do not.

You leave your camera in the woods with the intention of wireless remote shooting, a child comes along and moves your camera and in the process pushes the shutter button, do you own the copyright? No you do not.

Take the last scenario and exchange a child for a monkey, you still don't own the copyright, you did not frame or take the photo.

Somebody does not have to own the copyright, an image can be copyright free, that is what Wikipedia are asserting, the image does not have copyright on it so they are free to reproduce it without restrictions.

42
Business of Photography/Videography / Re: Who owns the photo?
« on: August 11, 2014, 03:27:42 PM »
Hi, in Germany the situation would be quite clear. When a human take a picture, he/she owns the copyright. A copyright cannot be sold or resigned. Only user rights can be sold. But a monkey is no human and according to German law an animal is just a thing. So this monkey or his owner do not have the copyright because a thing cannot have a copyright.

Robert, you are missing Wikipedia's point. They are not saying the monkey owns the copyright, and they never have, they are also not claiming the "owner" of the monkey owns the copyright. What they are asserting is that the owner of the camera did not take the photo so he does not own copyright.

Or to put it more clearly in your terms, a human did not take the photo, so how can a human claim copyright? It is a bit more nuanced than that, but that is the core of the assertion.

43
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sony A77II
« on: August 11, 2014, 10:52:05 AM »

So, I'm sorry, but the reviewer in this video is full of crap when he says this kind of AF system has never been done before. MASSIVE LOAD OF BULL SH*T!!

The reviewer! It is Mr Gary, I'll say anything to sell my $60 $2 piece of plastic that can be done just as well with a milk carton (Google it), Fong.

Clearly he needs a reality check, so much of what he says is factually wrong it is painful.

Or to put it like jrista, WHAT A LOAD OF BULL SH*T!!

44
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sony A77II
« on: August 11, 2014, 10:32:15 AM »
For those interested in how innovative the "new" Sony AF system is, here is a copy of my Canon 1V manual, it is a film camera that came out in 2000, 14 years ago.

I have been taking auto changing AF tracking points for granted since I got my 1V's in 2003.

45
I have used another guys Spider holster set a couple of times. Highly recommend it. The main drawback is you lose the ability to use your custom AS plates, but in standard wedding shooting I don't find that too much of a loss. You can get the holster casting that just goes on your own belt too.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=808803&gclid=CNHRkfmpisACFUVo7AodylkAAQ&Q=&is=REG&A=details

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