October 20, 2014, 05:16:17 AM

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Messages - tomscott

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16
EOS Bodies / Re: Official: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
« on: October 06, 2014, 09:48:58 AM »
Kelby one got their hands on the camera with photographer Peter Reed Miller. Clearly a good Canon plug but still rated pretty highly!

http://youtu.be/dW9-8kBcx1I

17
Animal Kingdom / Re: Red Panda
« on: October 06, 2014, 09:22:18 AM »
Thanks, not an animal I had seen before. Very shy and timid but very beautiful.

18
Animal Kingdom / Re: BIRD IN FLIGHT ONLY -- share your BIF photos here
« on: October 06, 2014, 09:21:28 AM »
Thanks :)

20
Animal Kingdom / Red Panda
« on: October 06, 2014, 06:35:12 AM »
Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite Lake, Keswick, Cumbria UK

http://www.lakedistrictwildlifepark.co.uk

5DMKIII 70-300mm L

Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite, Keswick by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite, Keswick by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite, Keswick by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite, Keswick by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite, Keswick by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

Red Panda, Lake District Wildlife Park, Bassenthwaite, Keswick by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

The red panda (Ailurus fulgens), also called lesser panda and red cat-bear, is a small arboreal mammal native to the eastern Himalayas and south-western China that has been classified as vulnerable by IUCN as its wild population is estimated at less than 10,000 mature individuals. The population continues to decline and is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching, and inbreeding depression, although red pandas are protected by national laws in their range countries.

The red panda is slightly larger than a domestic cat. It has reddish-brown fur, a long, shaggy tail, and a waddling gait due to its shorter front legs. It feeds mainly on bamboo, but is omnivorous and also eats eggs, birds, insects, and small mammals. It is a solitary animal, mainly active from dusk to dawn, and is largely sedentary during the day.

The red panda is the only living species of the genus Ailurus and the family Ailuridae. It has been previously placed in the raccoon and bear families, but results of phylogenetic research indicate strong support for its taxonomic classification in its own family Ailuridae, which along with the weasel family is part of the superfamily Musteloidea. Two subspecies are recognized. It is not closely related to the giant panda.

The red panda is specialized as a bamboo feeder with strong, curved and sharp semi-retractile claws standing inward for grasping of narrow tree branches, leaves and fruit. Like the giant panda, it has a “false thumb” that is an extension of the wrist bone. When descending a tree head-first, the red panda rotates its ankle to control its descent, one of the few climbing species to do so.


23
Black & White / Re: Black and White Landscapes!
« on: October 06, 2014, 05:24:22 AM »

24
Landscape / Re: Mountains, Lakes and Rivers
« on: October 05, 2014, 03:27:46 PM »
Helvellyn & Striding Edge, Cumbria by TomScottPhoto, on Flickr

5DMKIII 16-35mm F2.8

Helvellyn and Striding Edge yesterday. Fantastic moody day, great walk with good friends although I was holding them back with the Camera!

25
Lenses / Re: 16-35 f4 IS vs 16-35 f2.8 II stopped down
« on: October 03, 2014, 12:24:10 PM »
Well the thing between these two is obvious. Do you ever shoot or need to shoot lower than F4. From what I have seen the 16-35mm F4 is a tad sharper in the corners but not night and day, get past F5.6 and they are very simiilar.

They are about the same size and weight, the new hood is a million times better, but the IS can be a very useful tool from testing you can shoot up to about a second with it meaning all new possibilities in different environments with good sharp results.

I still feel that the original 17-40mm has some advantages, it's size its tiny in comparison the new one has grown quite substantially it is also 200g lighter so for people who hike a lot this may be a benefit. When you step all of them down to F8-11 they all perform similarly the two older models suffer with a little more CA, the new one controls this very well, but has as much or worse vignetting.

Price, the F4 is bang in the middle but the 17-40mm is probably the most popular lens in canons line up being the smallest and cheapest so these can be had really cheap, the 2.8 is still redic over priced and the new F4 is still quite pricey.

I don't think if you have the 2.8 it's worth downgrading, I say downgrade because at 2.8 it's much more useful and can be used for events, landscape, architecture and atrophotography.

If you are serious about landscape you usually take a tripod anyway.

Cracking lens but not really a very exciting lens as dustin abbot has said.

26
EOS Bodies / Re: Tilt screen - Articulating screen
« on: October 03, 2014, 07:27:08 AM »
It is an issue with weather sealing as far as I know.

The pro bodies take a fair amount more hammer and are used in more demanding situations than the amateur bodies.

Saying that the 70D is Canons most appealing camera for video, it has all the features you would want including dual pixel phase detect AF with the tilting touch screen for nice smooth transitions.


27
Software & Accessories / Re: Messenger Bag for my 5D3+24-70+70-200
« on: October 03, 2014, 04:09:36 AM »
I'm also looking for a discrete bag. A few people stated the Think Tank Retrospective 7 holds a 5DIII, 24-70 2.8 and 70-200 2.8. Will it hold a gripped 5DII with those two 2.8 lenses, or would I have to look at the Retrospective 10? Thanks for great feedback on bags!!!

I think it will struggle. There are 3 compartments, middle is where you put the camera. If you put a grip on you may have to put it sideways and it will probably overlap one of the other lens pockets.

There are bigger bags in the lineup but the 7 is quite big as it is and the one up is a big bag physically.

28


Its truly a great time to be a photographer, and the world is so easy to travel and everything is so accessible now is the time.

People get consumed with their lives and work, they don't realise what is out there. Once you experience it, it will change your perspective of life and whats important. Photography is a really good catalyst for this IMO.

That is way too mature of an attitude for this site.   ;D

Haha maybe, well I have got fed up of work at 26… I work as a photographer and graphic designer for a Newspaper for many a perfect job in this economy. I have quit work, sold my car and going traveling for 5 months across south, central and northern America.

Bit more info here:
http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=22621.0

I felt consumed by it and wasn't happy, same thing everyday. So decided to have a life change in pursuit of… not sure when I figure it out Il write something about it!  :D

29
Im not sure I agree with you, there is always a need for new imagery.

The way population is expanding and natural habitats being destroyed, animals are migrating into suburban areas, new habits, new behaviour, endangered, critically endangered etc There is always something interesting and worth pursuing, its like saying ah well might as well not bother. If people did that originally we wouldn't know what we do today, pursuit of information and using it to educate the masses.

There will always be a need for new imagery for different publication. Going back to the gear, 600+mm lenses have been around for 30+ years, they may have got lighter a bit sharper but they are essentially the same, people still buy them to get closer so the tech has been there a long time. What is great now is for amateurs Sigma and Tamron have made more accessible in their 150-600mm.

Its truly a great time to be a photographer, and the world is so easy to travel and everything is so accessible now is the time.

It is also about education, how where when! Learning behaviour. The best wildlife photographers are ones who are interested in the subject and understand it. Learning is half the fun surely?

It sounds stupid, I live in Cumbria where there are more sheep than people, similar to New Zeland. You would think shooting a pic of a sheep is easy? Well any animal that is a Herbivore generally grinds its teeth while eating grass, shoot it at 1/250-1/500th and you will have a pin sharp body and a blurred head. Stupid example but I learned the hard way by thinking exactly the above. Even the most basic and domestic animals, there is a way and means of getting the right pic and knowledge is key!

People get consumed with their lives and work, they don't realise what is out there. Once you experience it, it will change your perspective of life and whats important. Photography is a really good catalyst for this IMO.

30
Photography Technique / Re: Travel set up
« on: October 02, 2014, 09:30:52 AM »
Thanks for the links Rusty!

Very interesting reading about other peoples travels. The packing and planning is stressful making sure you have thought of everything! But like you I will relax once i get going!

Those posts are great! She certainly travels heavy tho, her situation is a little different to mine tho so I suppose she needs all the extra gear. I am trying to keep everything down to a minimum. Those Scottvests look interesting might have to have a look at those!

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