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Messages - triggermike

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31
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: October 27, 2012, 10:20:11 PM »
Hurricane Sandy brushed by South Florida and left us with one of the most incredible surfs we have ever seen!!!!! This is the pier at Deerfield Beach, Broward County, Florida . . .

32
Canon General / Re: when/how to start a photography business?
« on: October 12, 2012, 11:29:40 PM »
Time is money.

When setting "reasonable" prices, you need to get a feel for 'how many' will buy and look at the time you spent. Here in USA, when starting out, you probably want to making at least $50/hr.

33
1D X Sample Images / Re: Any Thing shot with a 1Dx
« on: October 01, 2012, 09:13:27 PM »


The Pilot.

Nice portrait - well done!

34
EOS Bodies / Re: Time from Announcement to Release
« on: August 29, 2012, 10:54:28 AM »
Rent a 5d mkiii for your trip.

35
Portrait / Re: Speedlight for perfect night portraits
« on: August 27, 2012, 05:57:25 PM »
+1 on Neil van Niekerk's website and his book - worth every cent.

36
Portrait / Re: Speedlight for perfect night portraits
« on: August 27, 2012, 04:25:23 PM »
Use Manual mode setting on the camera. Meter the ambient (non-subject portion) and set the camera using the aperature you want with the corresponding speed the meter is telling you to set. If the speed is too slow for your liking (REALLY slow - as T Bruce mentioned the flash will freeze your subject), bump up your ISO to get faster speed for the same aperature. I usually like to dial back a half-stop or so on the ambient exposure so the subject will stand out more. Now turn on your flash and use in E-TTL and all will be fine! This is even better indoors at many occasions because you can simply leave your manual settings as they are from scene to scene as the ambient stays relatively consistent. If the scene changes dramatically, just dial a new speed - but small variations in ambient, especially if you slightly underexpose, will not kill the shot.

37
I would not skip the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. It may be touristy, but you're there to photograph the Canyon. The views and vantage points are spectacular from the south (as well as the North.) One thing to know is the South Rim is a lower elevation than the North Rim. When viewing from the North Rim, you see the flat land beyond the canyon. When viewing from the south, you see all canyon. Also, great sunset opportunities at the South Rim.
Try to go to Moab if you can. Two parks in one place which can't be beat and a nice small town to stay in.
I'm jealous!

38
Animal Kingdom / Re: Osprey Flight Shots
« on: August 25, 2012, 10:25:24 PM »
Beautiful!!! That new focus speed on the mk iii is really shining!!!

Here's  one I took last year -

39
Speedlites, Printers, Accessories / Re: What size Softbox
« on: August 22, 2012, 10:36:42 PM »
For larger groups with speedlites, use rectangular shaped box, strip box or multiple square (or rectangular) boxes. You can also use shoot-thru umbrellas (multiple if necessary) for groups. Umbrellas are very inexpensive - get a couple and try it out. Use one as a key and one opposite as a fill.

40
EOS Bodies / Re: Shooting leveled landscape pictures
« on: August 22, 2012, 10:29:09 PM »
Shoot conscientiously as level as possible, then level further as necessary in post-proceessing using the level tool.

41
Portrait / Re: West Somerset Railway
« on: August 22, 2012, 08:55:14 AM »
Overall good lighting and pretty models. Photo 1 is the best IMO as the lighting is good and you have included some of the railway elements. Photo 2, though well lit, beautiful subject and a nice portrait, it does not include any of the railway elements which is the subject of the post. Phot 3 could be improved by eliminating the "hot spot" on the back wall paneling (either by reshooting or via post processing.) Hope this helps!

42
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: July 14, 2012, 02:24:46 PM »
No matter how much you spend on tripod/head, make sure to get a quick release mechanism at the head which is "Arca-Swiss" compatible.

And now some more birds . . .


43
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: July 13, 2012, 11:47:09 AM »
Quote
I would add, "patience".  Sometimes animals take forever to do something interesting.  Planning and local knowledge of when animals are active, where the good sunsets are, when the boats come in, etc...is also a huge factor.  Even general tidbits like, animals generally feed at dawn and dusk, and small birds are generally more active in the hour after a rainstorm, etc...

Good points! And that patience can't be stressed enough - even when you are knowledgable about the surroundings, habits, etc. Almost every good photo of a bird, moose, bear, etc. I've taken was at a time when I was ready to give up or leave. I once went to Brooks River Falls to photograph bears and jumping salmon and waited an hour with no luck, got kicked off the viewing platform, then re-entered and stayed another hour and finally got the photo I wanted!

44
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: July 13, 2012, 11:03:51 AM »
Quote
Casual photographer learning new hobby. I want to learn how to take such amazingly beautiful bird shots as I am seeing so many of you guys posting. Gary, I especially like your work...any tips you (or any other posters) could give me. I have a 7D and 100-400L and a cheap $30 tripod that broke. I need to get a good tripod and monopod ( and heads) for birds, flowers and maybe landscapes. Don't want cheap any more but since I'm not a pro, I don't need a Rolls Royce. I don't mind paying for good quality. What do you use or recommend? Also, I've only shot jpegs ( I know I must learn to use RAW) and some pp with Canon's DPP. What do you use and how do you do any pp? I have been reading this forum for several months and am learning a lot from all of you, so this isn't meant only for Gary. Thanks everyone for your time to give advice and show case your work.


Gitzo legs, Acra or RRS heads are great recommendations - but are in the realm of "Rolls Royce". Here's a nice, lightweight carbon fiber/basalt tripod capable of holding what you have and a little more for almost half the price.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/795783-REG/Velbon_GEO_N530_GEO_N530_3_Section_Carbon.html
And here's a nice ballhead that won't strap ur wallet
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/848858-REG/FEISOL_CB_40D_CB_40D_Ballhead_With_QP_1444750.html
There are other similar ballheads out there in this price range. If you want something more, or the best, you're going into the over-$300 range for a ballhead.

As for your "hobby", the largest impact on your work is composition, followed by proper light/exposure/technique. Equipment is AFTER all these. My best recommendation is to peruse the web and your local bookstore for many great books out there which are invaluable. I've been at this photography thing for more than 35 years and I still pick up books every couple months or so - there's always something else to learn. Sometimes it just one small tidbit which makes the entire book worth the purchase!

Good luck.

45
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: July 12, 2012, 12:55:34 PM »
Nice Vulture!!! Up close and personal!!

Here's a couple more . . .


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