March 04, 2015, 10:49:48 AM

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Messages - ecka

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16
Lenses / Re: New Unique Macro Coming? [CR1]
« on: February 08, 2015, 01:30:11 PM »
150mm w/ 2:1 macro.

+1
 Or 200/4 IS 2:1 Macro ;). Or it could be a 100mm f/2 1:1 macro with a built-in 2x TC, which converts it into 200/4 2:1

17
What's wrong with 20mp?

18
EOS Bodies / Re: POLL: aa, or not to aa (5ds vs. 5dsr) ?
« on: January 30, 2015, 02:10:17 PM »
Option number 5:
Yes, but only if the resolution is high enough, so that diffraction would take care of it :).

19
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 30, 2015, 08:51:33 AM »
Hi ecka.
Does the battery grip interface support the rear wheel too, as this is not normally replicated on the grip whereas the other controls are.
While your at it I'd like a battery grip for my 40D BG-E2N (MarkII perhaps) with an AF ON button please, this would help me not get confused when swapping between 40D and 7D.  ;D

Cheers, Graham.

Hi Graham. Everything is possible, at least in my world :). We only need tools to make it happen.

Well, I'm not the engineer here, but as I said before, everything is possible. If you are asking for an easy fix, then maybe some MagicLantern developers can answer this question. I'm sure this is not a big deal, really. It only takes time and tools.
About the 40D grip, perhaps buying a second 7D body would be much cheaper and better solution.

20
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 27, 2015, 07:52:11 AM »
Fully agree. While I really like Ecka's idea with the left side battery/handgrip, a DSLR does not seem to be a good choice for left-handed operation at all. Too big, too heavy.

Mirrorless would be a much easier - and immediately available - route to go. Canon EOS M or even smaller M2 - (maybe even M3 any time soon) plus any of the EF-M lenses, including zooms is lighter and easier to handle - thanks to touchscreen.

I got a small 29 € L-bracket for my EOS-M that could be used as left side grip to hold camera, while turning zoom ring with index finger and tapping touchscreen with thumb to select/activate AF. Camera can then be set to take shot automatically as soon as focus is locked. Right hand not needed for (basic) operation.

I'll probably get shot for saying this on a canon forum,  but if small size and weight were paramount, I would pick up one of the Olympus micro 4/3 cameras.

I agree. It is really big and heavy, but the same idea should work for SL1/100D or even EOS M (yes, a battery grip for EOS M :D ).

21
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 27, 2015, 07:43:56 AM »
Hi ecka.
I think this is absolutely the correct route, at least this is what I saw in my head when I started reading this post, just don't have the ability to create the artwork, nice job by the way. If I'm correct the 5DIII and 7DII both have the joystick duplicated on the battery grip so the only major control that is not dealt with on this solution is the rear scroll wheel.
How difficult would it be for one of the third party manufacturers to run with this, they have access to all the control buttons and wheels needed. The only addition I can see that might be needed is an aluminium or maybe carbon composite reinforcement for the L shape due to the torque that would be transmitted especially on some of the larger standard zooms before you get to the range equipped with a bracket. I know that there would be costs but with today's rapid prototyping technology I'm sure this could be kept quite low.
Amazing to get from problem to solution in 5 pages!

Cheers, Graham.

PS @ dilbert, thank your lucky stars that you are not disabled and be less selfish in your attitude towards us, there are a lot of us out here!

This is it ;)

Hi Graham. Everything is possible, at least in my world :). We only need tools to make it happen.

22
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 26, 2015, 06:43:16 PM »
Pistol Grips are readily available, can use either hand.

use it as is, or could be the base of a project to make a left grip.



This could work even for some bigger lenses with collars, like 100-400L or 300/4L :).

23
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 26, 2015, 03:36:07 PM »
This is it ;)

24
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 26, 2015, 02:59:38 PM »
I support the optional "left grip" idea.
Could an ambidextrous design work for right-handed people too? :) Any advantages?

25
Lenses / Re: Which Sigma Lense?
« on: January 25, 2015, 01:17:46 PM »
Definitely Sigma 18-35/1.8 Art.

26
Lenses / Re: Upgrading lenses for college student
« on: January 24, 2015, 10:54:26 AM »
Best budget lenses:
EF-S 18-55 IS STM
EF-S 55-250 IS STM
EF-S 10-18 IS STM
EF-S 24/2.8 STM
EF 40/2.8 STM
YN 50/1.8

27
Landscape / Re: Within Forests
« on: January 20, 2015, 08:08:08 PM »

IMG_1261 by ecka84, on Flickr

28
Since getting a 35mm f/2 IS, I rarely use the 40mm pancake.  If the 35mm IS fits in your budget, I'd recommend going for that instead of the 40mm.  I also find myself preferring to either use the 35mm or any of the 50mm options I have, including the 50mm f/1.8 II.  The positives about the 40mm pancake are the low cost, fast and quiet focusing, and size.  My negatives are "just OK" image quality (maybe I have a bad copy) and the short barrel doesn't give you much to hold onto.

I don't mind the build quality and noisy AF of the 50mm 1.8 II.  I don't think the AF is that slow.  Yeah, the bokeh isn't as pleasing as that of other 50mm lenses, but it costs a lot less.  If I had to make a recommendation to someone, I'd advise the 40mm pancake over the 50mm 1.8 II.  They'd probably be happiest with the 40mm, but I know they'd be even happier with the 35mm f/2 IS.

Even though I don't use it often, I can't bring myself to sell the 40mm pancake.  First, I wouldn't get much for it.  Second, it's so convenient to carry as a wide-ish just-in-case option when I am using telephoto lenses.

TBH, from what I've seen, 35 IS has some really nervous and bad looking bokeh, which perhaps is typical for 35mm. Not to mention the monstrous 3 stops of vignetting wide open. The IS is good for video, very good, but is it worth 4 times more than the 40mm pancake? The tiny thing is one stop slower, but it vignettes one stop less too. I'm just trying to be objective, the pancake has it's own shortcomings, but (IMHO) there is a lot less to hate about it, for the price.
Curious.  The-Digital-Picture.com confirms your note on vignetting, but the bokeh looks pretty good.  I use mine wide open most of the time (which is one reason for buying an f2.0 lens) and haven't noticed the vignetting at all.  I have no complaints on bokeh, but then my subject matter hasn't revealed it much.

You make a good point on value.  The pancake is an incredible lens for a great price.  The 35 IS shines in low light, action, and creative slow shutter shots.  One needs to determine whether these scenarios are worth the extra price tag.

Well, 35 IS bokeh may be lacking the smoothness in a specific focus range, just like 40 STM does, but it also has that "directional pattern" towards the edges and corners, which (IMHO) makes it even worse. Maybe it's not that obvious on crop cameras, but on FF it looks pretty bad.
About the vignetting. It may not show if you are shooting JPGs with the peripheral illumination correction turned on.

29
Since getting a 35mm f/2 IS, I rarely use the 40mm pancake.  If the 35mm IS fits in your budget, I'd recommend going for that instead of the 40mm.  I also find myself preferring to either use the 35mm or any of the 50mm options I have, including the 50mm f/1.8 II.  The positives about the 40mm pancake are the low cost, fast and quiet focusing, and size.  My negatives are "just OK" image quality (maybe I have a bad copy) and the short barrel doesn't give you much to hold onto.

I don't mind the build quality and noisy AF of the 50mm 1.8 II.  I don't think the AF is that slow.  Yeah, the bokeh isn't as pleasing as that of other 50mm lenses, but it costs a lot less.  If I had to make a recommendation to someone, I'd advise the 40mm pancake over the 50mm 1.8 II.  They'd probably be happiest with the 40mm, but I know they'd be even happier with the 35mm f/2 IS.

Even though I don't use it often, I can't bring myself to sell the 40mm pancake.  First, I wouldn't get much for it.  Second, it's so convenient to carry as a wide-ish just-in-case option when I am using telephoto lenses.

TBH, from what I've seen, 35 IS has some really nervous and bad looking bokeh, which perhaps is typical for 35mm. Not to mention the monstrous 3 stops of vignetting wide open. The IS is good for video, very good, but is it worth 4 times more than the 40mm pancake? The tiny thing is one stop slower, but it vignettes one stop less too. I'm just trying to be objective, the pancake has it's own shortcomings, but (IMHO) there is a lot less to hate about it, for the price.

30
50/1.8 AF noise alone could compromise the low profile, unless it is a very noisy street :).
40 STM works for me.

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