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Messages - LetTheRightLensIn

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1906
EOS Bodies / Re: 5D Mark III with Continuous RAW Video Recording
« on: May 26, 2013, 06:19:39 PM »
Magic Lantern RAW video for the Canon EOS 5D Mark III comes to the Mac & OSX
http://blog.planet5d.com/2013/05/magic-lantern-raw-video-for-the-canon-eos-5d-mark-iii-comes-to-the-mac-osx/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Planet5dBlog+%28Planet5D+Blog%29

This was very helpful. It looks like the RAW workflow is starting to take shape!

I want to preface my next question by saying that I'm a video n00b. Should I do most of my tonal/color adjustments in ACR, or should I wait until I have the footage in AE/Premiere and do most of it in Davinci Resolve, MB Looks, etc.? Does it matter where I do it? My instincts tell me that there are two competing issues:

1. Which program is better at a specific task (e.g., recovering blown out clouds).

2. Flexibility of not having to go upstream to make changes to footage and then re-import downstream. For example, if I do my tonal/color work in ACR, won't that mean I have to go back-and-forth, rather than being able to quickly make adjustments via plugin without the extra step of re-importing?

Again... I'm just a n00b here. :-)

I think the stills software tends to have more powerful sliders when it comes to saving highlights, changing brightness, shadow, curves, contrast, etc. The CS6 version of ACR has some very powerful tools that are not just simple dials, pre-sharpening, NR, etc. And then do a few more tweaks in Photoshop itself if needed. Photoshop also hs some very powerful plug ins for creating B&W and such (although I'm having trouble getting the NIK stuff to batch so that is not working out yet). I'd try to get it right as much as you can with those controls. Then you can use AE to save it out to Cineform 12bit or something and do the rest in Premiere. Once it's save into video you can't use ACR or Photoshop on it anymore I don't think (without doing crazy stuff at least).

How do you go about color grading/correcting THAT many images?

Do you select a bunch of them at a time, that appear to be 'similar' for some things?  I was just thinking that it would be nigh impossible to do a lot of layer masks on a bunch of images, etc...since things would be moving and you'd have to do it frame by frame...?

I could see in bulk doing a mass change in global things, like total contrast, white balance, etc...but if you had say, a blown out window, that would take a lot of work to restore that frame by frame wouldn't it?

If you could get that footage, still raw where Davinci could do it, then you could use their tools to have tracking done for you on that window, etc....

So, just curious can you give some more in depth on what all changes you manage with PS and the like? I like the idea, but can't imagine the workflow...

Thanks in advance!!

cayenne

Well obviously if you need to do tracking masks and so on leave that stuff for video editing programs, but you can do an awful lot, awfully well with ACR/PS. The new ACR sliders almost work like mini-HDR.

1907
EOS Bodies / Re: Why no crop mode on 5d mkiii 1dx
« on: May 26, 2013, 06:18:03 PM »
...
Gimmie Chuck Westfalls number so he can explain why canon left out this feature.
...

http://fakechuckwestfall.wordpress.com/

Enjoy. :)

Oh dear though he seems to have gone all moon landings/9/11 conspiracy theorist though....

1908
EOS Bodies / Re: Why no crop mode on 5d mkiii 1dx
« on: May 26, 2013, 05:59:25 PM »
http://www.eoshd.com/content/10294/3-5k-canon-5d-mark-iii-raw-video-with-magic-lantern-and-latest-updates
 
seems to me it is possible ml crop mode. on 5d iii

Yes, with the new ML releases you can get crop mode on 5D3 now in video.


1909
That's what I'm seeing too, that the 32GB and 64GB are the fastest. Personally, I will be avoiding KomputerBay until the dust settles. I bought a KomputerBay 128GB and it clocked around 72MB/s. I don't see any risk in ordering a KomputerBay 64GB, but be ready to return it. I've got a Transcend 128GB on order (from weeks ago, before I knew they were unreliable), but I'll be ready to ship it back same day I get it.

The other known solid candidates are Toshiba, Hoodman, Lexar, and Transcend. I've got a Lexar 32GB and a Hoodman 64GB and they are both solid.

I have three 1000x 32GB Lexar that run fine. And a Hoodman 64GB that was supposed to arrive today but got held up.

The Toshiba don't seem to have arrived for direct sale in the U.S. yet, supposedly they are the fastest of all and perhaps might be able to do 1920x1080p30 (the Lexar max out at 1920x1080p24).

1910
It seems like there must be something wrong with my card now. It was brand new Lexar 1000x 32gb. I recorded about 10 1920x1080 raw clips on it with no problem...usually about 3 at a time after which I would delete the files but not reformat or anything. Then it stopped working. Now it will write 116.1mb before the buffer fills. This is regardless of what resolution I try. ML shows a write speed of 6.6mb/s, so something has crippled the card.  Just for the heck of it, I tried one of my older Lexar 400x 16gb cards and ML is able to write to them at 26mb/s no problem, so it's not the camera.

I've tried reformating, aligning partition to 4096, completely overwriting the card. Still, no change from 6.6mb/s. Does this sound familiar to anyone? I'm thinking that it's 3 days old at this point and I should just return it.

The other isolation test (in addition to trying a different card) would be to try that Lexar card with a different camera. But that's probably academic at this point. Bottom line: if it doesn't work... it doesn't work. And if you can solve the problem by getting a different card... save yourself the headache.

I've purchased several cards because it's clear that the size options are a function of the card's performance. I'm returning a KomputerBay 128GB card. I'll find out how the Transcend 128GB works when I get it next week. If the Transcend 128GB doesn't work out, I'll be trying Toshiba 64GB and maybe Transcend 64GB (if I feel like pressing my luck). Considering how much we pay for these things, the ability to return it is part of the cost.

I'd try sticking to 64GB (or 32GB) since all the almost all of the 128GB seem to run a touch slower (and some such as the Komputer Bay vastly slower).

Also I'd avoid KomputerBay at any size since I'm reading so many reports about cards failing after two weeks and talk that they use Lexar parts that got rejected.

1911
For an AE only workflow it should be possible to do it if you can find and .icc profile that has sRGB/REC709 primaries mixed with gamma 2.2 instead of sRGB TRC. I didn't find one with a quick web search, but I'm sure one has to be out there. I think I will just make my own such. Then you could just use that in AE and it should be good (at worst if you used that for the output conversion profile that should force it to work out).

1912
Okay, so I have been playing with this today after receiving my 32gb Lexar 1000x card. It's really amazing. The amount of color and detail is phenomenal. I don't think it's been posted here, but After Effects can work with the DNG files directly. So workflow is:
1)copy M00000*.RAW to computer
2)raw2dng M00000*.RAW
3)In AfterEffects File->Import->File
4)Choose the first DNG file only (this should cause After Effects to import as Footage)
5)Adobe Camera Raw opens and shows you the first frame. Tweak as needed...it will apply to all frames automatically.
5)Right-click the imported footage in the Project window and choose Interpret Footage->Main
6)Change the frame rate to 23.976(or whatever you shot at)
7)Create a composition with the size and frame rate as what you shot
8)Drag footage onto composition.
9)Render as whatever you like (I've been using H.264, Main profile 5.1 with 31Mbps average and 52Mbps Max)
10)...
11)Profit!

I will add though, working with the DNGs in Lightroom is still really useful though. I find it much easier to tweak and do cool stuff. I also created a PS Action to batch process images in Silver Efex Pro 2...that takes a LONG time, but was really cool.

You can also set AE to default to 23.976 (and 16bits) if that is how you shot most of your footage (very likely since 1920x1080x30p tends to choke out after a few seconds even with 32GB Lexar 1000x, I can only get 23.976 rates sustained). And then you can simply change step 3 to "Import-Multiple Files" and then you pick the first DNG and edit in ACR to set the template and then it pops open the file browser again and this time you hit "Import Folder" (make sure that the DNG are numerically orderded and have nothing more than a simple letter at the end of the numbers otherwise, for some reason, AE tends to get confused and not think you have a sequence and then you have to mess around forcing it to realize what is going on) and then skip straight to step 9!

I've been exporting to AVI lossless 16bit and also trying CinemarkAVI 4:4:4 HD optimized/filmscan1/2 to preserve everything best for use in Premiere Pro so I don't lose enough more on final compression out of PP and if I do end up compositing or editing colors more in PP. For files that are not Earth shattering, I think I might just keep the CInemark 4:4:4 for archival purposes to save space and delete the original RAWs (for really good stuff I feel like I'd still want to hang onto the RAWs for now and delete the intermediate footage when I feel I probably won't use it again for a while).

I'm thinking of making a deep color video, since some of my flower shots are to intense for sRGB gamut. I might make the footage in ProPhotoRGB if I can get full color management working in MPC+MadVR or I might just render them to the profile of my monitor set to native gamut (although they would've be shareable with others for the most part in this case). It would be pretty cool. Deep color video is not something the average person on the street has been able to really mess with before. But RAW video allows it. At least from Canon DSLR.



1913
Okay, so I have been playing with this today after receiving my 32gb Lexar 1000x card. It's really amazing. The amount of color and detail is phenomenal. I don't think it's been posted here, but After Effects can work with the DNG files directly. So workflow is:
1)copy M00000*.RAW to computer
2)raw2dng M00000*.RAW
3)In AfterEffects File->Import->File
4)Choose the first DNG file only (this should cause After Effects to import as Footage)
5)Adobe Camera Raw opens and shows you the first frame. Tweak as needed...it will apply to all frames automatically.
5)Right-click the imported footage in the Project window and choose Interpret Footage->Main
6)Change the frame rate to 23.976(or whatever you shot at)
7)Create a composition with the size and frame rate as what you shot
8)Drag footage onto composition.
9)Render as whatever you like (I've been using H.264, Main profile 5.1 with 31Mbps average and 52Mbps Max)
10)...
11)Profit!

I will add though, working with the DNGs in Lightroom is still really useful though. I find it much easier to tweak and do cool stuff. I also created a PS Action to batch process images in Silver Efex Pro 2...that takes a LONG time, but was really cool.

One problem I find using AE only even when you don't need to do anything in PS is that you get stuck the file being put out in sRGB format and yet most video monitors/hdtvs/etc. use gamma 2.2 which is NOT what sRGB format uses so you get a tone curve shift which slightly increases apparent contrast/saturation/darkes deep and mid tones so then all your careful ACR edits in AE don't look quite right in Premiere Pro or when you play the files back with most software unless you calibrate your screen to sRGB TRC instead of gamma 2.2.

I guess you might be able to set the output profile under color management in AE to not use Working Space but to an .icc profile that uses sRGB/REC709 primaries mixed with gamma 2.2 though. I haven't come upon such a profile though. I think I will try to make one myself. That would solve the AE-only workflow color management issues.

(With PS workflow as I said in my other message here you just stick in a convert to Custom RGB REC709 primaries gamma 2.2 profile step as the last step in your batch action before saving/closing so you don't have to have on hand an .icc file that has the proper settings.)

1914
EOS Bodies / Re: New AF Technology Coming in July? [CR1]
« on: May 25, 2013, 02:15:17 PM »
The surprise is that the 70D will focus better than the 1DX and that only Rebels and xxD will get top AF from now as the new Canon responds to constant cries from customers that the lower tier bodies always have worse AF.  ;D ;)

1915
First, of course ACR should be set to sRGB working space and 16bits when using it to do ML RAW video (for stills ProPhotoRGB 16bit makes most sense).


1916
Basically when you use the Photoshop/ACR workflow to process the RAW DNG folder you have to set working space for ACR to sRGB 16bits which is all fine BUT most people calibrate monitors and TVs to something like gamma 2.2 but you were editing in sRGB and as soon as you take the footage out of something not completely color-managed which includes almost all video playback software you end up with the sRGB video file's sRGB tone response curve not getting converted for use on a gamma 2.2 display and you get the contrast and saturation a trace boosted and the shadows and lower mid-tones become too dark.

The fix is to add a step right before you save out as TIFF in your batch action. Use "Edit->Convert To Profile->Custom RGB" and then rename it to "REC709 Primaries With Gamma 2.2" (or whatever) and hit OK (it should already have selected REC709 primaries and gamma 2.2 for you automatically, if not, make sure it has gamma 2.2 set and REC 709/sRGB primaries set). This will store each TIFF in Gamma 2.2 with sRGB/REC709 primaries instead of in sRGB TRC with sRGB/REC709 primaries so your videos should look the same when played back on your sRGB/REC709 primaries and gamma 2.2 calibrated display as they did when you edited the initial frame in ACR/Photoshop.

But that is not all. That simply makes the TIFFs get stored as gamma 2.2 but AE will still convert them back into sRGB TRC instead of leaving them at gamma 2.2 unless you make sure to set "Preserve RGB" as one of the options for the output codec in the render queue and I believe that you also need to change AE preferences to chose "None" for working space to turn off its color management engine.

That does the trick (it's actually simple all you do is turn off the AE color management once and save those prefs and then just add the convert to profile with gamma 2.2 thing to your RAW batch action in Photoshop once and you are good to go with nothing more needed to be done each time.

Then when you import into Premiere Pro it looks the same way as it did in Photoshop/ACR (assuming your monitor is internally calibrated to sRGB/REC709 gamut and gamma 2.2 D65m if not there may be slight variations due to primaries in different locations and such although if you at least calibrated it through software the gamma/WB ramp should still work in your video card and that should still match up more or less).
It really makes a considerably noticeable difference. Your video won't end up overly saturated/contrasty/dark in dark to midtones compared to what you thought you had prepared in Photoshop/ACR. If you were fine-tuning in Premiere Pro anyway I suppose it doesn't matter but it saves you from having to re-tune to make up for sRGB vs gamma 2.2 differences which is hard to exactly do by hand and it means less need to push bits around once you are possibly no longer in full bit format.

1917
Here's some footage I edited together from last weekend in Central Oregon:

https://vimeo.com/66866250

All but the last three shots are with the Magic Lantern firmware....it's a bit tedious in post but WORTH IT!

nice!

1918
They have fixed the Mac GUI version of raw2dng, no more 2GB recording limit!  That was very fast and very un-Canon!

That's because it's not Canon, it's the MagicLantern team  :o

Exactly!  A rag-tag band of part-time, just-for-fun programmers can fix their software in a couple of days...meanwhile Canon announces a firmware update and then takes over 6 months to actually roll it out... :o

Well, they have some advantages. If things break and your camera no longer works, they aren't legally liable. Granted if it happens to too many people they'll just stop using it. But Canon needs to make sure things are as bullet proof as possible, otherwise they face potential massive liabilities. Also, ML runs on top/alongside the Canon firmware, they don't have to do everything top to bottom like the firmware does.

That said...I definitely agree Canon should move faster with some of their firmware updates.

They also have some pretty huge disadvantages though. Zero documentation to work off of (other than for the basic ARM core and a few standard bits)!

1919
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: yes or no..6d for video...
« on: May 23, 2013, 09:12:58 PM »


No, not the 6D for video. Too much aliasing and moire. If it is going to be a Canon, then the 1DX is definitely the best and the 5D3 the next best. The others won't do much for you.
[/quote]

VAF filter for 365 is still 700 less than 5D with same video quality.
[/quote]

With the ML hack the 5D3 is miles better than 6D+AA filter. 6D uses slow SD cards that can't support ML RAW so well.

1920
Theory!

Flipping the switch triggers metering. Since evaluative metering invokes code that looks at multiple metering points and tries to intelligently guess what to do, it's somewhat reasonable to assume that it might a different decision on what to do each time it's invoked if the light entering the lens in non-uniform across the image.

A way to test if this is happening is to point the camera so the image is completely uniform in brightness across the image — at the sky, or a flatly coloured wall, etc.

Please bear in mind that I don't own this lens or camera, but I do have experience in programming. In algorithms like this, it's often the case that there's some guesswork involved — hell, I once implemented an algorithm that would just randomly choose one of tho values if it couldn't determine one value over another with any degree of certainty, and it worked just fine.

Since I doubt the camera saves the reasoning behind its metering decisions between each metering, I can easily see this sort of thing happening in something that's supposed to be "smart" like evaluative metering. If you require absolutely consistent metering, I guess evaluative isn't the right mode to choose.

+1

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