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Messages - danski0224

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166
"List price" on Amazon is meaningless. Estimated retail of $299 at Canon USA webpage.

The MF4890dw was available 8/2012 on Amazon, not sure if these devices get annual-ish updates.

I have (had) a MF4690 and began seeking a replacement due to scanner incompatibility with new Windows OS. The WIA driver portion was no longer supported. It figures that shortly after buying a new multifunction, Canon decides to update something and now it works. Kinda peeved about that, and the driver issue was well known on the web- which is part of why I decided to get a different machine. That said, it has been reliable and inexpensive to operate.

For a little more, I'd suggest getting a color laser multifunction.

I have a Lexmark cx410 series, and the print output is pretty darn good at 1200 x 1200 dpi. There aren't many color lasers with a native 1200 x 1200 print output at that price point (1200 x 1200 for monochrome is more common, but typically near $1k USD price point). It will do wireless, but you have to get an add-on dongle. It won't do wireless/ethernet/usb at the same time. Kind of a pain to set up, but as mentioned before, output is very, very good.

Color output is near inkjet photo quality. PS3 emulation, too.

The Lexmark print app works for me. I didn't know about the wi-fi dongle and didn't order one.

Lexmark has a toner return program with some benefits.

The cx410 series does have Linux driver support.

The cx410de is $400 at Amazon as of this posting: http://www.amazon.com/Lexmark-CX410de-multifunction-printer-scanner/dp/B009RS0Y16/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1387280788&sr=1-1&keywords=lexmark+cx410

Not sure if you will find much multi-voltage support in a consumer level machine.

For an extra $100 or so, seems like a no-brainer to me.

167
Hello Mr Surapon Sir, these are lovely images - thanks for sharing.

Here is a photo of my wedding ring :)

5D III, EF100 f2.8, focus stacked

What is the inscription?

168
Nice pictures :)



Does something similar that tilts towards/away from the viewfinder exist? Even a 45* angle would be nice compared to the 90* angle.

 

169
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Thinking of swapping a 5d3 for a 1D4.....
« on: December 12, 2013, 07:53:53 AM »
I totally agree with the likelihood that the 1 Series use higher tier componentry.   There must be some reason people claim that 1 Series RAW files can be pushed and pulled more than lower tier bodies.

I use the spot focus feature tons so that's a knock against the 1D4.

You're probably right that the 1D4 may retain more value long term given that it is the last in the line of APS-H bodies and is very popular among wildlife photogs.  No doubt it is a great camera.  Just not convinced yet that it would be a step up from the 5D3 -- perhaps more of a lateral move....I mean I realize the build quality and FPS are an advantage but as has been discussed it does lose out on the 5D3 for some features (5D3 has 2 more cross type points, spot focus, low light servo performance).

Yes, for some reason, 1D files can be manipulated more in post, at least in my limited experience. I also think Canon files can be messed with a bit more in DPP than Lightroom, for example. But, Lightroom wins in the interface department.

I think the files look different, too.

It is possible, given good exposures to start with, that the 5DIII file can be cropped to match a 1DIV file with no loss in IQ. It may be possible to do the same with a 1DX file- crop it to a 1.3x FOV with no loss in IQ. The "reach" arguments are going away as technology marches forward.

I have noticed that Canon seems to be splitting up feature sets across the product line. Note the stellar center point in the 6D vs other current FF offerings. But, Canon made the body smaller than the 5DIII, which isn't appealing to me.

If low light AF performance and spot focus without a Big White are important, then a 1DIV isn't an upgrade over a 5DIII.

There are 3rd party focus screens available for the 5DIII, but ease of use doesn't come to mind. If focus screen use is of importance, then the 1DIV becomes an upgrade over a 5DIII.

The 1DIV also lacks all of the cool stuff that can be done with current Canon RT flashes through the camera menu. Although it may be possible to address this with a firmware update, it hasn't happened yet.

Given current offerings, the 1DX is the only one that has limited occurances of the word "or" when describing feature comparisons between current models.

The one major thing that the 1DIV has over the 5DIII is value in the used market. If the 1DIV is in good to excellent shape, you can flip it with little effort, and get more funding towards a 1DX or try out a 6D.

170
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Canon EOS 7D Firmware 2.0.5 Now Available
« on: December 12, 2013, 07:15:33 AM »
I wonder if the 3rd party issues are intentional or if they are a side effect of the coding.

Some 3rd party issues, like battery compatibility, are intentional.

Others, like the reported ML incompatibility, or lens issues, may not be quite as intentional.

In either event, users purchased the main hardware from Canon.

If Canon is intentionally seeking out ways to create havoc with 3rd party accessories, they must realize that in some instances, it will reduce sales.

I'm sure there are thousands of 7D users that bought the hardware (or, continue to use the hardware) just because it runs Magic Lantern.

Some 3rd party lenses are better than OEM. "Better" can have many meanings. In any event, choice is good. If there are issues with 3rd party lenses with this update, this will make or break promises of service when the stuff doesn't work.

Losing all those battery sales must be a sore point, but maybe there is some validity to saying that the OEM's are priced too high. Someone will always make knockoffs, but maybe if the price was lower for OEM, they would sell more...

171
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Thinking of swapping a 5d3 for a 1D4.....
« on: December 11, 2013, 08:33:34 AM »
Just wanted to get some thoughts from people who have had both cameras.

I shoot a lot of varied stuff from portraits to events, landscape, nature and wildlife (this is where my main interest lies).  I upgraded from a 7D to a 5DIII mostly for the better noise handling and full frame sensor despite losing the crop factor advantage.  I have been very happy with my 5D3 and I would absolutely love a 1DX for the integrated grip, better weather sealing, FPS and deeper buffer.

The 1DX however is currently not in my budget so I have been kicking around the idea of going from my 5D3 to a 1D4.  The only issues that I have run into with my 5D3 are having to wait for the buffer to clear from some action sequences I've taken and the lack of interchangeable focusing screens when I've been using some of my Zeiss lenses and manually focusing large aperture lenses.

Anyone have any thoughts on this crazy idea?

I noticed landscapes in your post above.

If you use wide angle lenses, there is a difference between the 5DIII and 1DIV.

There is the option of a Canon Refurb 1DX. The CPW price alerts work.

I wouldn't expect the retail price of a 1DX to come down anytime soon, nor would I wait in anticipation of this rumored big megapixel body. If the "studio" body materializes, it is aimed at a different segment than the 1DX, so it isn't really a replacement of the 1DX, therefore, the anticipated 1DX price drop may not happen.

Also note that the 1DX does not support the Ec-S screen, and I don't recall seeing anything on this in the upcoming firmware update. That said, I can see a difference looking through 5D series and 1DX viewfinders. The 1DX appears clearer to me and where manual focus was maddening in a 5DII, I can do it through a 1DX (yes, diopter was adjusted in both instances).

There are many posts claiming similarity between the 5DIII and 1DX cameras, and I think they are further apart than what meets the eye or spec sheet. I suspect that a comparison between exploded parts diagram views with part numbers of both cameras would confirm this.

The 1DIV does NOT have the same spot focus feature found on the 7D, 5DIII or 1DX. The 1DIV spot focus feature only works with the supertele lenses with a focus button.

The 5DIII focuses better in low light than the 1DIV. "Low light" is kind of vague, but you may want to try it out if you can with both cameras.

It is hard not to recommend the 1DX.

It is possible that the 1DIV will retain more value over time than the 5DIII, so switching now may not be a bad move.

172
Canon General / Re: Useless or absurd accessories
« on: December 10, 2013, 08:11:10 AM »
I bought a micro camera to clip onto Fluffy's collar to see what she did all day. The camera was set to take an image every 10 seconds. I managed to capture 9 hours of sleeping cat.

I tried it on her outside. She came back without camera and collar. I never found it.

Don't ask, don't tell...

Secret life of cats.

 ;D

173
It seems that lots of posters here have never worked in retail, and therefore do not know how some "customers" act.

"Morals" never even enters the thought process, it is always about getting something for nothing... or pitching a fit at the cash register until they get what they want.

Not directed at the OP, just a thought after going through this discussion.

Props to Helen for even entertaining a discussion over what amounts to a print error.


174
Are you sure? If I'm on, say, photo black and pick a matte paper the 3880 will change for me. I don't have to walk up to the printer and change it on the printer UI.

You may be right. I missed a sentence in the manual, and the printer may switch automatically.

"You may sometimes need to switch catridges as described below when using non-Epson media".

I am ordering the Epson "Signature Worthy" sampler pack.

175
Well, those of us in the USA have had some pretty darn good deals on Canon paper lately, if you purchased from Canon USA. Still have a B1G4 thru 12/28.

For me, the cost of the paper is negligible.

I am hoping for a buy 1 get 4 ink sale....

 ;D

176

Good find. There's very little real difference between the two.

I highly recommend trying out Epson's Hot Press Bright paper. Epson has a paper sample pack that's worth getting. It has two sheets each of all the press variations, exhibition fiber, etc. I was a glossy paper fan until I tried the press papers. Of course there's a ton of papers from 3rd parties as well.

I may give that a shot.

I did pick up a pack of Canon matte paper, and although I didn't like it at first, the look has grown on me.

I also picked up the Red River sampler pack plus their special media sampler pack.

Once the remaining new inks come in, I'll change them and then do some test prints. I'll probably follow Red Rivers advice and just print the same image on each sampler page for reference.


Exactly. I do consider the 3800/3880 economical once you've dealt with the up front cost above the value of the ink included with the printer.

In the same line of thought, the Pro-10 has value for dialing in smaller prints.

177
Thanks for the detailed reply and that's some interesting math!  I have owned several Epson printers over the years and have never been happy with the color, even after extensive calibration.  The Canon profiles and ability to print in 16-bit color aren't perfect, but MUCH closer than any of my calibrated Epson's ever were.  Being able to make a single print versus many to get the color right is going to save me a lot of money.

The first few prints out of my new to me printer weren't so good. I used the modified version of the Atkinson Test Print that is available for free online.

The print done with the Canon Pro-10 was stunning.

First print from Epson 3800 was bleh. More like WTF because the demo print that was done for me was absolutely stunning on the same Canon paper. The person I bought the printer from sells prints for a living, so I bet he had it dialed in...

Then I found a new revision for Traditional Photo Paper ICC profiles (10.0 12/09/2013) and PDF instructions on how to use it on the Epson website. Once I followed the instructions for Photoshop, I could not visually differentiate the Epson 3800 output from the pro-10 output- even using an Epson printer to print on Canon photo paper  ;D so my stash of buy one get 4 is good  ;).

Similar issues in Lightroom, but once I figured out what profile to use, print output was fantastic.

Even moreso considering that some of the cartridges in the 3800 printer are 3 years old.

Granted, the printer interface for the Pro-10 is much nicer than the Epson, and switching black inks is automatic on the Canon and must be done manually on the 3800.

178
I bought a Pro-100 several weeks ago when Adorama had it for $100AR with free paper.  For that price, I thought it would be worthwhile to get some additional control and convenience over my prints.  So far I've made about 30 prints (mostly 8x10) and the indicators still show everything as full.  Does it drop like a cheap car fuel gauge or something? I.e. 300 miles to half tank, 350 miles to 1/4 tank, 10 miles to Empty!

I have a Pro-10 and the ink levels drop fast in my use.

I have some 13 x 19 prints I have done, and those are quite a bit bigger than 4 x 6 or 8 x 10. Could ba a "duh" moment, or maybe I had different expectations.

I think I have done about 10 each 13 x 19 and probably 20 8.5 x 11 and maybe a dozen 4 x 6, and I'm through the starter inks and getting into a 3rd change on some.

The Pro-10 cartridges have an ink volume of 14ml and cost ~$16 each.

The Epson 3800 cartridges have an ink volume of 80ml and cost ~$60 each.

Simply based on volume and OEM ink costs, Canon is $91.42 for 80ml of ink (5.7 Canon cartridges for 80ml). This doesn't account for wasted ink during cartridge replacement. Six cartridges = $96. Both printers don't use the same number of ink cartridges, so a direct comparison is difficult.

There is a print cost comparison at Red River Papers, and the Canon is roughly 2x Epson per print in their testing.

There is an established Epson ink aftermarket too.

So, the smaller cartridges explain why the levels drop fast on bigger prints.

I find the Canon Pro-10 output very nice, but it isn't economical*. It would have been better to figure this out beforehand :)

* inkjet printing isn't "economical", but small ink cartridges don't match well with bigger prints...


179
Well, I happened upon a gently used Epson 3800 for a fair price. It was local, so I could check it out.

Had to buy some ink, but I'm still in it for less than a 3880 refurb and way less than a new 3880.

Doesn't seem to be too many real life major differences between the 3800 and 3880 based on a quick search.

Network setup (wired) was a bit of a pain. No PnP there. Had to read the manual.

Tried out some prints onto Canon paper, and as long as I pick the right settings, print output looks very, very good.

The choosing the right print settings part is more involved than the Canon Pro-10.

180
I looked at the 4900, and the net is full of poor reviews. I get it that it is more common to post poor reviews than good ones.

Any particular time to watch for Epson deals, with "Black Friday" and "cyber Monday" distant memories now?

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