October 24, 2014, 03:57:35 AM

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Messages - ahsanford

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181

For those stuck with a style of LCD they do not prefer, would you pay a typical Canon markup price for an add-on like a grip or wireless speedlite transmitter (let's say $300) to have the option to dismount your current LCD 'module' for one with the functionality you prefer?  Let's presume is was quick-connect-like and could be changed out in a matter of seconds (like a lens).

Would you own more than one and change them out based on what you are shooting?



Never say never, but I doubt I would.  Far better for Canon to put an articulating touch screen on all cameras and then let folks articulate and/or touch if they want to or leave face out and not touch if they don't.

Sure, but see page 2 of the survey data.  Though leaving it unarticulated addresses some of the fears of robustness, a lot of non-articulating-screen folks might have a weather-sealing hangup if they did that.  Even if the screen is left in place, there still are moving bits and mechanism there that a solid (integral) display would not have.

- A

182
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 18, 2014, 01:03:12 PM »
How big is the birding/ wildlife photography base for a high end crop camera? I know that the bird/ wildlife pro photographers trend toward 1DX, but there are some very well respected pros using 7D and the Big Whites. Amateurs with this interest are grouped into "money no object (already own a Big White)", "value for money, middling budget (using a Little White 400, 100-400, or a Tammy, planning on upgrading to Big White eventually)", and "bargain basement / don't plan to invest in a Big White, will stick with Little White". I am in the middle group and am a good sales target for a high end crop camera. The last group will be reluctant to pay a premium over the 70D for a higher frame rate.  The first group? I have to say that I have not seen many 1DXs in the hands of amateur bird/wildlife photographers locally, with the exception of a very few tripod/blind shooters.

You nailed it.  The middle group should be willing to pay anything for the 7D2 (I'm not kidding: $3-4k!) because it saves them from having to go all Great White, which costs much, much more.  I continue to rep for these people as the 7D2 represents (for them) is the best single possible upgrade they can make for longer BIF/wildlife/sports/racing shooting in the pricey but not impoverishing $2k-ish investment.  (That... or possibly the new 100-400 if it is really solid.)

The size of that middle group is the question.  If it's big enough, I think Canon should make the 7D2 that crop-sized 1DX and pro-it-up with best in class features, and ask north of $2k for it.  Let the 70D be the premium APS-C rig and the 7D2 be the exotic long-range specialists' super-tool.

But there is a legitimate point folks make that Canon needs a $1,500-$1,700 or so crop body and the 7D2 must be it.  That would speak to your third group being wooed with something clearly better than the 70D (for more than just framerate: I'd think the AF, build quality, pixel count, etc. would all be improved) and not for twice as much. 

The first group buying a 7D2 will happen if it's 'pro' enough.  Not having to lug as heavy a Great White into the bush is a weight-related win, and it's like a built-in 1.6x T/C without an AF performance or sharpness hit for those who do want to lug their big lenses and net even longer shots.  So I could see 1DX users picking up a 7D2 as a second or third body, sure.

- A

183
61 responses, everyone, nice work!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s_thankyou.aspx?sm=Ws7JK%252bcabzvEcxXxJcXkq45j8D7iDKRGz0nakT9q9A0%253d

Thanks for the perspective.  We have a pretty healthy split between the four camps.  I know we 61 voices are not Canon's market (not remotely), but do you think there's merit in a 'skinny digital back' just for the LCD?

For those stuck with a style of LCD they do not prefer, would you pay a typical Canon markup price for an add-on like a grip or wireless speedlite transmitter (let's say $300) to have the option to dismount your current LCD 'module' for one with the functionality you prefer?  Let's presume is was quick-connect-like and could be changed out in a matter of seconds (like a lens).

Would you own more than one and change them out based on what you are shooting?

I'm not trying to start a Kickstarter here -- I'm just curious how much value people would see in fundamentally changing their camera body in this way.

- A

184
Software & Accessories / Re: Lee Big Stpper with UV filters
« on: July 18, 2014, 01:08:46 AM »
I don't have the Lee Big Stopper, but I use grad ND filters a lot.  I have found that I sometimes get mechanical vignetting at wider angles if I leave the protective filter on.  Something to look for.

+1.  On the 24-70 you can stack, though I don't.   

But under 24mm you need to watch how much stuff you are stacking up in front of the front element or you'll lose your corners from vignetting.

- A

185

Reminder for those who just jump to the end of a thread and add their thoughts, there is an ongoing survey at survey monkey to mine this out very crudely.  More responses are welcomed:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TK65Z2Y

Thanks!

- A

186
If Canon is listening.......................  Touch screen is nice, but there has to be a way to turn it off and on without turning off the camera. 

Agree.  I am stunned Canon hasn't gone touchscreen on most models (maybe not the T3 or T5) and simply put a 'touchscreen defeat' option in the menu to satisfy both camps.  One would think that if we can have a lock screen on a phone, a touch screen could be shut off on a camera.

That might limit the ability of the engineers to optimally make a smudge resistant screen for those who don't want a touchscreen, but that's not my area of expertise -- I defer to the materials guys and consumer electronics designers in this forum (if we have any).

- A

187
My old G1X had the swing out type display, similar to the 70D.  Mt new G1X MK II has a swing up touch screen that is larger, and much easier to use.  Plus, it can be made much larger, since it does not need all the supporting structure.  It appears to be much more difficult to damage, I worked in electromechanical design for 35 years, and can pretty well tell as far as reliability of a structural design.

It also looks very water resistant, the flat cable enters the body thru a rubber seal that will resist water entry, and might even be sealed, but I can't tell from the outside.

So far, its a improvement, but long term usage will tell better.

Anything is possible if you put the time and thought and cost into it.  The new Pentax MF rig with the 51 MP sensor is weather sealed and it has a tilty screen.  I don't think it swivels, though...

- A

188
On 2 & 3, there is no option for the fact that my camera simply doesn't have those features. There are things I WOULD like, but I'm not about to buy a new body just for them and the survey doesn't ask me what I want, it asks what I don't want. I respect the intent of the survey, but I think there is value in knowing what people want in a future body (but don't have in their current body/bodies.)

Thanks for putting it together nonetheless.

I am familiar with market research in my industry (not cameras), and yes, we'd have 6-8 questions to even 'rangefind' what type of user you are, what you currently use, what you lack today, etc.

So I admit that this is as crude a survey as you get.

- A

189
We need to start calling you survey man!  I'm all for a tough version of the articulated LCD - I had one on the 60D and loved it for macro and overhead shots.  I hate touchscreens of all varieties, phones included (not that we have a choice), but will concede that the one on the EOS M works well and is faster than the Q button for those random settings.

I'm just trying to segment the market using the CR Forum dwellers (who are the only people who buy cameras of course).

See this posting from that 7D2 thread:

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=21693.msg415241#msg415241

It's possible we have enough of a split on opinion that Canon should consider something like a relatively thin (1 cm?) removable module for the LCD, so people could slap in one of 3-4 different LCD types based on their preference.  Think of it like a MF digital back with just an LCD.  Then people could have whatever they want.  We can tweak our focus screens in some cases, so why not get the LCD we want?

I think of body selection as a sensor size first, IQ/AF/DR vs. price second, features are third sort of approach (and everyone's order is different!), etc. but possibly folks desperately need the LCD to be a specific variety or they just won't buy that body. 

So I'm wondering if the market is sufficiently spread out enough to warrant (a) two standalone SKUs -- identical cameras with different LCDs or (b) a modular snap-it-together setup that users can tailor to their needs.

The respondents so far -- even from this forum, a Gear Acquisition Syndrome opium den of mad enthusisasts and pros -- shows a fairly even split in LCD preference.  It's far less polarized of a preference than I would have guessed.  But let's see, I'd like to get a good 50-100 responses.

- A


190
I started a survey on a 7D2 rumor thread, but thought I'd increase my hits by having a standalone posting.

Head here for my simple and fast survey re: displays on the back of DSLR bodies.  I'm trying to segment everyone's take on touch vs. no touch, rigid vs. tilty-swively, etc.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TK65Z2Y
(I did this offsite to get more than one question asked with a multiple checkbox response, that's all)

Everyone can participate once, and then repeating the link should show the results.  It's interesting so far, but I'd like more responses if you have 90-120 seconds to give.  It's fast.

Thanks,
A


191
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 17, 2014, 03:50:02 AM »
In general:

This may be a bit above your price range, but this Gura Gear bag is designed expressly for mixed cargo:
http://www.guragear.com/uinta/

The F-stop Mountain series is similar in its configurability and chambering of different types of items:
http://shop.fstopgear.com/us/products/mountain.html

It seems a small distinction to have separate compartments, but it lets the nasty dirty campy stuff stay in a separate chamber. 

But in specifics, the type of camping you are doing defines your answer.  Car camping is not backcountry camping...

- A

192
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 16-35 F/4L IS -- Reviews are trickling in...
« on: July 17, 2014, 02:00:17 AM »

IS data re-run with Neuro's advice in mind.  A solid 2s run-up with the IS was used for each shot.

New IS data below.  Same non-IS data as before.

1) IS OFF at 16mm, I netted:

  • 3 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure
  • 2 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/8s exposure
  • 1 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/4s exposure

2) IS ON at 16mm, I netted:

  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure
  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/8s exposure
  • 4 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/4s exposure
  • 2 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/2s exposure
  • 1 out of 5 sharp shots at 1s exposure (two borderline ones were called 0.5 each)

3) IS OFF at 35mm, I netted:

  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/60s exposure
  • 4 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/30s exposure
  • 1 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure

4) IS ON at 35mm, I netted:

  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/60s exposure
  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/30s exposure
  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure
  • 4.5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/8s exposure (a borderline one was called 0.5)
  • 3.5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/4s exposure (a borderline one was called 0.5)
  • 2 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/2s exposure
  • 0.5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1s exposure (a borderline one was called 0.5)

I'll be damned.  Neuro's trick shows 16mm IS is more like a 2 stop benefit, but the 35mm data only slightly improved (still around 3 stops).

Neuro, is this true with all IS lenses?  That might imply sports guys with long glass never net as sharp a shot with the first frame in a long burst that they might get with the rest...

- A

193
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 16-35 F/4L IS -- Reviews are trickling in...
« on: July 17, 2014, 01:41:32 AM »

Neuro.  Wow.  Had no idea.  My 5 shots were discrete shutter depressions, but they were in rapid succession.

Will check this out now. 

- A

194
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 16-35 F/4L IS -- Reviews are trickling in...
« on: July 16, 2014, 09:12:32 PM »
Just ran a crude IS test on my 5D3.

1) IS OFF at 16mm, I netted:

  • 3 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure
  • 2 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/8s exposure
  • 1 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/4s exposure

2) IS ON at 16mm, I netted:

  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure
  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/8s exposure
  • 4 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/4s exposure
  • 1.5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/2s exposure (a borderline one was called 0.5)
  • 0 out of 5 sharp shots at 1s exposure

3) IS OFF at 35mm, I netted:

  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/60s exposure
  • 4 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/30s exposure
  • 1 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure

4) IS ON at 35mm, I netted:

  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/60s exposure
  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/30s exposure
  • 5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/15s exposure
  • 4.5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/8s exposure (a borderline one was called 0.5)
  • 2 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/4s exposure
  • 1 out of 5 sharp shots at 1/2s exposure
  • 0.5 out of 5 sharp shots at 1s exposure (a borderline one was called 0.5)


Granted, n of 5 is weak statistical power for a variable like my grip/shooting technique and the method of selecting sharp shots is decidedly subjective, but the numbers above suggest I'm seeing a sliver over 1 stop IS at 16mm and about 3 stops IS at 35mm.

Perhaps infrared has found something here.  I don't want to go on a witch hunt, but can I ask others with this new lens to attempt a similar evaluation?  Your grip / breathing very well may be better than mine, but the approach should work -- use non-IS to find where your ability fails you, and then see how much further IS lets you slow the shutter.

- A

195
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 16-35 F/4L IS -- Reviews are trickling in...
« on: July 16, 2014, 06:43:53 PM »
Ahsanford,
Yeah..everything I have read is super positive about the IS.  I am an extremely experienced  photographer. 

...

Like I said, I am very experienced and truly know and understand ALL the variables...except the IS ..LOL!

Super helpful, thanks.  I'd agree your test should absolutely net sharp shots.  Something seems amiss.

Potential culprits:

  • How good is your grip / mechanics of holding the camera steady?  I presume this is not your problem, but it's worth ruling out:  pick a 'tough to handhold without IS' shutter speed (say 1/4s for a 16mm shot or a 1/15s for a 35mm shot) and take 10 shots with and without the IS on.  If the IS shots have a higher hit rate and the than the non-IS shots, that implies the IS is working and it may be your grip / holding technique.

  • Do you know the IS is on and working?  One simple test is with your ears.  Verify the IS switch is 'on' and switch the lens to MF (so you don't hear focusing adjustments) and then you press the shutter halfway with your ear next to the lens.  You'll initially hear a little noise at half-shutter-press, but after you let go, the IS motor/mechanism/whatever should be whirring in the background for an additional moment or two.  It's really, really faint with IS in the year 2014, but the sound is there if you listen for it.  If you don't hear that noise, I'd wonder if there was a glitch with the IS internals or possibly you have a faulty connection with the IS switch.  I defer to the nerdy folks and professionals on this forum, but if you can't hear the IS going when the switch for IS is 'on', something is off and I'd consider returning the lens.

  • It could be a poor AF, potentially.  Take AF out of the possible root causes and repeat your test:  switch to MF, go LiveView and 10x manually focus and repeat your 'tough to handhold without IS' test.  And yes, you need to handhold during LiveView for this -- it shouldn't be too hard with these wide FLs (I'm reaching / speculating at this point.)

- A

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