August 01, 2014, 12:49:47 AM

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Messages - ahsanford

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31
Hey gang,

I've already gotten two private message inquiries on my lens, but as I lack 25 posts at FM, I cannot respond to them privately!

Is there some way I can contact these folks directly, or must I reply to my own advert with a public answer to a private question?

- A

32
Lenses / Re: What would a 16mm or 18mm F2 FF lens look like?
« on: July 23, 2014, 10:54:45 AM »
I LOVE my 20mm 2.8 lens, but man is it showing its age. I still haven't seen the perfect wide prime from Canon, but I'm hoping for a 20mm refresh. If not, I'd buy a 16mm or 18mm in a heartbeat.

I love to see a release of a Canon 20mm f/2 IS

I would not hold your breath there.  The next non-L IS refreshes would logically be the 50 and 85 -- I'm amazed they aren't out already.

- A

33
Lenses / Re: What would a 16mm or 18mm F2 FF lens look like?
« on: July 22, 2014, 05:26:25 PM »
At the cost for a good lens, the market would be small.  Since most (not all) wide lens usage is for landscapes, where f/16 is often used, it would be a waste.  For real estate interiors, auto interiors, or in tight quarters, it might work, but having proper lighting would be better and cheaper than paying $5,000 for a lens, and then not having the depth of field needed for interior photos.

What kind of use would you have for it?  A wide angle like that is not suitable for portraits.

Astro, I'd presume.  Wide + Fast is just what you need for stars, I'm told.

- A

34
Local camera shops here in Los Angeles were the same story as B&H, KEH, Adorama, etc.:  they offered around $650 for something they'd clearly flip for $1100-1300, so that's out.

I've opted to give Fred Miranda a try.  We'll see how it goes.

My only hangup was the call to describe my lens as a 9 or 9+.  I believe it to be a perfectly clean lens other than scuffing on the hood, so I called it a 9+ but was sure to flag the hood scuffing.  We'll see how I do!

- A

35
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 22, 2014, 11:13:18 AM »
I'm sure mammals require more effort (staying downwind, etc), but I've never attempted to photograph them.

Mammals can be easy.  They let you get nice and close sometimes.  Just make sure any bunnies you try to take pictures aren't from Caerbannog...

It's just a rabbit!

Well, that's no ordinary rabbit!  That rabbit's got a vicious streak a mile wide!  It's a killer!

Run away!

36
eBay is the best bet to sell it fast at fair market value but there are fees.  Craigslist is cash in hand, no fees, but it can take a looooooong time to sell a big ticket item like a lens and you have to deal with the tire kickers and flakes.  It also depends on where you live - if you live in a big city its a lot easier to sell on CL.  You might be able to sell it on Fred Miranda but I think you need to have an established post history to sell there.  Selling to any retailer, like KEH or Adorama is obviously not going to get you the most money because they have to resell it at a mark up but at least its quick and sure.

I am in a major city, but I get the heeby jeebies that they'll know (a) I own other decent gear and (b) where I live, so it becomes a 'meet me at Panera Bread' highly public transaction.  Not a fan.  They could ask to hook it onto their body for test shots -- a totally fair request -- and then just walk away.

eBay is a dead end for me as I don't have any sales racked up.  No one would trust an unproven seller with a nice lens purchase, one would think.

So I'm leaning towards the fire-and-forget big online houses, but I'd love to hear of another option if there is one.

Thx,
A

37

And I think I'm a jerk if I dangle that I have a 24-70 F/2.8L I and do not let people have a look at it.

Attached advert from a guy who clearly has not sold much gear.  Reach out if interested with a message.

- A

38
Gang,

I've had a 24-70 F2.8L I sitting unused since I opted for the 24-70 F/4L IS (which is a joy to use, by the way).  I made up my mind to sell it some time ago.

So I went through one online quoting process with a few folks -- KEH, B&H, Adorama, etc. -- and kept seeing quotes of X and the same lens being sold at the same sites for 1.5X. 

I lack the eBay time to rack up happy customers, and I'm told that eBay is a customer-tilted justice system in which I may be found guilty without a proper trial.

So I am asking:  what is the easiest way to sell lenses that minimizes drama, maximizes simplicity, and doesn't involve me giving it away for nothing. 

Easy question, right?

Annnnnnnd:  Go!

- A

39
Software & Accessories / Re: Lee Big Stpper with UV filters
« on: July 20, 2014, 01:47:43 AM »

[his test shots]



There are a ton of variables that affect your vignetting performance, so we can't just say "the 17-40 vignettes at ____ FL".  These include a few that you mentioned, but there are others:

  • If you are using UWA Lee rings or standard Lee rings.
  • How many slots in the holder, if there is a 105 CPL ring in front, etc.
  • If you leave a clear/UV/haze on the front element of the camera before the Lee hardware is applied
  • How tall + how far off of the front element the filter ring is located
  • How thick the CPL is, and if the leading edge is stepped out beyond 105mm (which some do to avoid vignetting)

I ran a similar test on the new 16-35 F/4L IS and got different results than you did, which should be expected given differences between the lenses:
http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=21554.msg409701#msg409701

- A


40
Software & Accessories / Re: Lee Big Stpper with UV filters
« on: July 18, 2014, 07:57:52 PM »
I just got my Lee filter kit and Big Stopper. Planning to use on my 2.8 16-35 II and my 2.8 24-70 II. I normally keep B and W UV filters on these for "protection".  Just wondering what others who own the Lee system do......do you put the adapter on over your UV, or take the UV off while using the Lee system. I put the adapter on over my B & W's.... it fits, but when you take the adapter off the UV filter tends to come with it and I could see it easily getting stuck. I have been reading a lot about the UV or no UV "protective" filter debate. I have always used them, but I may "go bare" now.....just wondering what other Lee users do! Thanks for any info!

I don't see the reason for using the UV-filter when I'm using my Lee system. Not like it is protecting against anything (it's no longer the outermost filter on the lens) the only thing it might do is decrease the IQ, introduce extra flare and possibly vignette. Normally I leave my wide angel adapter ring on my 17-40mm all the time, because that's what I use most of the time. That in turn means I don't use a UV-filter for that lens.

I think some UV/clear filter believers (goodness knows I am one) believe every lens' front element should be protected if possible.  And there is legitimate concern for this in the context of 100x150 / 4x6 / 4x4 filter user -- if you are shooting the tide or a river and your camera takes a splash, takes a sandy gust of wind, etc., a Lee Foundation holder and a Big Stopper will do little to protect the front element.

All that said, using my Lee square/rectangular ND grads and NDs is the one time I leave my lenses front elements exposed.  The certainty of vignetting on wide angles is worse than the possibility of a nasty salt water splash.  Keep in mind that I principally use these sort of filters on wide angles.  I don't know if I would make the same decision on longer FLs.

- A

41

For those stuck with a style of LCD they do not prefer, would you pay a typical Canon markup price for an add-on like a grip or wireless speedlite transmitter (let's say $300) to have the option to dismount your current LCD 'module' for one with the functionality you prefer?  Let's presume is was quick-connect-like and could be changed out in a matter of seconds (like a lens).

Would you own more than one and change them out based on what you are shooting?



Never say never, but I doubt I would.  Far better for Canon to put an articulating touch screen on all cameras and then let folks articulate and/or touch if they want to or leave face out and not touch if they don't.

Sure, but see page 2 of the survey data.  Though leaving it unarticulated addresses some of the fears of robustness, a lot of non-articulating-screen folks might have a weather-sealing hangup if they did that.  Even if the screen is left in place, there still are moving bits and mechanism there that a solid (integral) display would not have.

- A

42
EOS Bodies / Re: Eos7D mk2, How EXCITED will you be if . . .?
« on: July 18, 2014, 01:03:12 PM »
How big is the birding/ wildlife photography base for a high end crop camera? I know that the bird/ wildlife pro photographers trend toward 1DX, but there are some very well respected pros using 7D and the Big Whites. Amateurs with this interest are grouped into "money no object (already own a Big White)", "value for money, middling budget (using a Little White 400, 100-400, or a Tammy, planning on upgrading to Big White eventually)", and "bargain basement / don't plan to invest in a Big White, will stick with Little White". I am in the middle group and am a good sales target for a high end crop camera. The last group will be reluctant to pay a premium over the 70D for a higher frame rate.  The first group? I have to say that I have not seen many 1DXs in the hands of amateur bird/wildlife photographers locally, with the exception of a very few tripod/blind shooters.

You nailed it.  The middle group should be willing to pay anything for the 7D2 (I'm not kidding: $3-4k!) because it saves them from having to go all Great White, which costs much, much more.  I continue to rep for these people as the 7D2 represents (for them) is the best single possible upgrade they can make for longer BIF/wildlife/sports/racing shooting in the pricey but not impoverishing $2k-ish investment.  (That... or possibly the new 100-400 if it is really solid.)

The size of that middle group is the question.  If it's big enough, I think Canon should make the 7D2 that crop-sized 1DX and pro-it-up with best in class features, and ask north of $2k for it.  Let the 70D be the premium APS-C rig and the 7D2 be the exotic long-range specialists' super-tool.

But there is a legitimate point folks make that Canon needs a $1,500-$1,700 or so crop body and the 7D2 must be it.  That would speak to your third group being wooed with something clearly better than the 70D (for more than just framerate: I'd think the AF, build quality, pixel count, etc. would all be improved) and not for twice as much. 

The first group buying a 7D2 will happen if it's 'pro' enough.  Not having to lug as heavy a Great White into the bush is a weight-related win, and it's like a built-in 1.6x T/C without an AF performance or sharpness hit for those who do want to lug their big lenses and net even longer shots.  So I could see 1DX users picking up a 7D2 as a second or third body, sure.

- A

43
61 responses, everyone, nice work!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s_thankyou.aspx?sm=Ws7JK%252bcabzvEcxXxJcXkq45j8D7iDKRGz0nakT9q9A0%253d

Thanks for the perspective.  We have a pretty healthy split between the four camps.  I know we 61 voices are not Canon's market (not remotely), but do you think there's merit in a 'skinny digital back' just for the LCD?

For those stuck with a style of LCD they do not prefer, would you pay a typical Canon markup price for an add-on like a grip or wireless speedlite transmitter (let's say $300) to have the option to dismount your current LCD 'module' for one with the functionality you prefer?  Let's presume is was quick-connect-like and could be changed out in a matter of seconds (like a lens).

Would you own more than one and change them out based on what you are shooting?

I'm not trying to start a Kickstarter here -- I'm just curious how much value people would see in fundamentally changing their camera body in this way.

- A

44
Software & Accessories / Re: Lee Big Stpper with UV filters
« on: July 18, 2014, 01:08:46 AM »
I don't have the Lee Big Stopper, but I use grad ND filters a lot.  I have found that I sometimes get mechanical vignetting at wider angles if I leave the protective filter on.  Something to look for.

+1.  On the 24-70 you can stack, though I don't.   

But under 24mm you need to watch how much stuff you are stacking up in front of the front element or you'll lose your corners from vignetting.

- A

45

Reminder for those who just jump to the end of a thread and add their thoughts, there is an ongoing survey at survey monkey to mine this out very crudely.  More responses are welcomed:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TK65Z2Y

Thanks!

- A

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