July 26, 2014, 02:01:22 AM

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Messages - RustyTheGeek

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16
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 21, 2014, 06:45:08 PM »
I personally think any camera "backpacking backpack" is a huge waste of money and the people buying them are not really backpackers, they just like to think they are. Weight is a huge burden when backpacking, and all of those camera packs are ridiculously heavy. For example, the 35L Rover Pro is 5 pounds! I think my main pack is 1.5 pounds for comparison...

Just get a pack that fits you well and use the money you save on a good down sleeping bag. If you go this route, get lens cases for each lens and make sure it has a belt loop. When you get to where you are gonna be shooting, put each lens case on the waist belt of the pack and unstrap the tripod from the back.

Works perfectly for me all the time. I had no complaints when I was doing 18 miles and 10k of elevation gain a day through the snow. Plus my pack has loops for ice axes. I could be wrong, but I have not seen that on any camera pack.

Niterider is being brutally honest.  If you want a photography backpack to carry lots of camera gear more comfortably on a day hike, by all means, go for it.  If you plan to do real hiking and live out of your backpack for 2+ days, do yourself a favor and get real hiking gear just like you already do for real photography.  Learn how to camp, hike and carry weight.  Get in shape.  Camp with others that are more experienced and become a knowledgeable outdoor person.  You'll likely spend over $1000 - $1500 before you're done and you'll still lust after some better hiking gear.  And you will likely devise a special unique method and system for your photography so you can enjoy hiking and photography simultaneously.

17
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 21, 2014, 04:41:47 PM »
The fstop satori looks nice but there doesn't appear to be many options for carrying much outside the pack.  There aren't many points to tie on a bed roll, tent, sleeping pad (above or below) or other bulky items that don't fit inside.  There don't appear to be many outside pockets.  I'm pretty old school I guess but when I take enough stuff to support me and a partner for 2 days or 10 days, I use at least 65-85 liters of space inside my pack depending on weather temps and amount of food needed.  And that's before any camera stuff is packed. 

That interior space number doesn't include a couple lightweight Eagle Creek zipper pouches I hang outside for small items like headlights, batteries, etc, my camp chair I strap on the outside and four different water containers that I can attach securely to the sides due to the way my pack is made.  The water containers include a 3L MSR dromedary water bladder, a 48 oz Nalgene collapsible soft canteen and two 24 oz Nalgene bottles that fit the (too slim for normal liter bottles) mesh pockets made for water bottles.  Close to 6L of water capacity (depending on needs) that is not using space inside the pack.

I see this a lot in most back packs I see, photography or not.  It's hard to organize most internal frame packs because there are few pockets or attachment points.  My Kelty Redcloud 90 (from 2011) is more versatile than most internal frame packs and the price doesn't break the bank.

Sometime I'll try to take a few pictures of my set up for others to see.  I'm just too swamped right now to do it.

Good luck!!!   :D

18
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 21, 2014, 04:18:29 PM »
Whenever you try out a backpack, you should spend plenty of time trying it on in the store and fitting it to your hip and torso.  The fitting should be done with at least 30+ pounds of weight added to simulate a load.

With regard to boots, everyone has their ideal fit and style.  But if you're carrying more weight, heavier duty boots are highly suggested (as opposed to trail shoes) and should probably include ankle support.  All leather boots are good but might be a bit hot.  Some people's feet sweat more than others.  Full synthetic/wool socks are mandatory.  NEVER wear cotton socks!!

Personally, until you have carried a decent amount of weight farther than 3-5 miles up and down hills, you really don't know how well the boots will work.  Typically you need at least a half size larger boot than your normal daily shoe size due to foot expansion when hiking.  Make sure there is enough room in the toe box when going downhill or you'll have toe pain and you might even lose a toenail if a toe is hitting the boot too much when going downhill with your pack.

19
I think winglet has good advice but I would take it easy on file level encryption.  In most cases, encryption only ends up making it harder or impossible to recover data in the event of a drive failure or accidental deletion.  It will also impact performance a bit.  I encourage folks to encrypt only sensitive data, not ALL their data.  I can't imagine the need to encrypt 1000's of photos, movies or music.  Save encryption for smaller data files that contain information you never want seen and contains sensitive information.

20
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 21, 2014, 10:14:21 AM »
Quote

You can always put camera gear in to a serious hiking backpack but it's hard (if not impossible) to take an expensive photography backpack and use it for serious hiking.


I could not agree more. I've been using a F-stop Loka for a few years now, and while it's a great backpack and probably one of the finest camera backpacks available, I feel a lot more comfortable with my Arcteryx Astral 65 even if I put twice as much weight in it. There is a world of difference, at least to my me and my back. I would say that camera backpack manufacturers have a very long way to go, when it comes to ergonomics.  I'm thinking of adding a Lowepro Toploader AW 50 to my kit, now that I have sold the Loka, to be chucked in with the rest of my hiking kit. It should hold a L-plated 6D with a wide angle zoom nice and snugly.

Generally I agree that trekking/mountaineering-specific packs are the best available in terms of wearing comfort. But the comparison of the F-Stop Loka with the Arc'teryx Altra is not really fair. The Loka is a 37 litre pack with not that much padding on the hip belt and the shoulder straps. It is not meant to carry 30 kilos like the Altra (which is a fabulous pack by the way). If you try a Tilopa BC (48 litres) or a Satori EXP (62 litres) you might get a rather different experience: both packs are very well constructed and padded so that you can carry your 20-30 kilos of photo gear, mountaineering stuff, clothes, food etc. quite comfortably. It's still heavy to lug around 20 kilos though…  ;D

Meh... 20 kilos (44 lbs) isn't that bad... but 30 kilos (66 lbs) is getting heavy!   ;)

IMHO - Once you pass about 20 kilos (44 lbs) every kilo (~2 lbs) after that becomes more and more significant.  And don't forget the general rule that you shouldn't carry more than approx 1/3 of your body weight.  I weigh between 172 - 178 lbs so that means I shouldn't carry more than about 55 - 60 lbs for long distances.  I have carried more than that for miles and it does add up after a while regardless of how well your pack fit is dialed in and optimized.  Make sure you have decent hiking boots and socks that are broken in and comfortable!

And I think I read somewhere in this thread that heavy gear goes in the bottom of the pack.  That's actually incorrect.  The heavy gear goes as close to your body as possible towards the middle/top of the pack so that the weight is transferred more directly through the pack frame to your hips and legs.  If it's in the bottom or outside swinging it pulls you off balance and is not carried well.

21
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: HUMIDITY ALERT!
« on: July 19, 2014, 05:40:16 PM »
I bought a couple of these caps from eBay way back.  They are well made and I figured a decent idea at the time but they are longer than the regular caps and so didn't fit the way I pack lenses into my lens cases.  So they live on some lenses in a drawer.

These caps are waaaay over priced for what they are.  I got mine for a fraction of that price on eBay way back.

In general, nothing is going to work in a constantly humid environment except for a storage device that removes the humidity constantly without regular maintenance.

22
Portrait / Re: Gypsy Girl
« on: July 19, 2014, 10:34:47 AM »
I like the first one, esp for the natural color.  The second one appears over saturated/processed but it's still a good image.  I also agree that a wider aperture on the second shot would bring out/isolate the subject more.  As for cutting off hands, I'm no expert but my understanding is that once you're above the elbows, that rule no longer applies.  In the first picture I would have zoomed in slightly more but not much.  It's a great composition regardless.  Be careful about adhering to some portraiture rules too seriously.  Some times those rules really matter and other times no one will notice or care.  Every shot is different.

All in all, both pictures are very nice.  Keep up the good work!!

23
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: HUMIDITY ALERT!
« on: July 18, 2014, 10:28:19 PM »
I don't know about the cat litter but many of the dessicants can be "recharged" or "reset" to an absorbent state by cooking them in the oven until the moisture they absorbed is expelled.  Something to keep in mind.  Many of the dessicant products that are housed in aluminum tins are designed to do this over and over.  Here is an example...

http://www.amazon.com/Pelican-Indicating-Desiccant-Silica-Canister/dp/B0018O035O

Just saying that maybe you could build up a supply of altoids tins or something when you make your own and be able to recharge them too.  Or use heavy duty perforated foil instead of paper towels.  Just a thought....

24
Late to the party, been off the grid.

To summarize...

1.  RAID configurations are nice but they are NOT backups, they just provide drive fault tolerance.
(Note:  If you don't fully understand RAID and have to recover, you may be in trouble.)
(Note 2:  Cheap RAID might bite you in the ass.  If it's not a battery backed up caching controller, it's cheap RAID.  A good quality controller is a must for all RAID above RAID 1.  Never use RAID 5, it's an old idea and unreliable.)
(Note 3:  If the last two notes scared you, stick with RAID 1, it's the simplest design and requires little effort by the controller to work.)
2.  Local backups are faster and better than online for system recovery.
3.  Online backups are easier, offsite and automatic so better for redundant file backup/recovery.  (Insurance backup.)
4.  Time Machine is better than nothing but Carbon Copy and Super Duper are MUCH BETTER BACKUP PRODUCTS for Mac.
5.  Do whatever makes you sleep well but more than one backup method is a good idea.
6.  I also do the network drive stored in a fire safe thing.  Just make sure the fire safe isn't a cheapo drywall lined thin metal box.
7.  Absolutely practice recovery!  I see backups all the time that were worthless without knowing.
8.  Try to have a email or other notification that tells you results when the backup runs and notifies you of errors.
9.  Don't use enormous volumes.  They are virtually impossible to restore if they fail.  2TB is big enough and even that will take a looong time to restore while you sweat bullets.

25
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 18, 2014, 07:41:45 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html

What kind of trip are you taking?  A 35 Liter pack isn't very big and it will be even smaller after you put in camera gear.  A 35 liter pack is usually only big enough for warm weather weekend trips.  Will you have to carry a tent, sleep gear, etc or are you just doing day hikes?  I really hope you are already an experienced hiker/camper so you know what you're doing on the trail.  Remember that back country pro photographers sometimes hire assistants to help them carry gear when necessary.  Don't over do the gear carrying it by yourself!


It's not serious camping, basically we are driving nearby the location we want to do camping, we are trekking around with backpacks but for sleeping we are going back to car to take tents and stuff. So it's not serious camping.

That makes a world of difference!  If I'm not mistaken, that means that you aren't really camping out of your backpack, you are car camping and day hiking.  That means you're likely carrying mostly camera equipment, a couple liters of water and some snacks.  So I'm guessing you're day pack hiking a few miles at most primarily to see the sights, enjoy the group companionship and take a lot of pictures.

I still think buying an expensive photography specific backpack is overkill and fairly useless as a true hiking+camping backpack but to each his own.  You can always put camera gear in to a serious hiking backpack but it's hard (if not impossible) to take an expensive photography backpack and use it for serious hiking.

Regardless, have a great time and let us know what you finally decide!   :)

26
Hmm... Hello 1 TB CF Cards!   :o

27
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 18, 2014, 06:48:48 PM »
I have been using a Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack which is an older version of the newer http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all-bundle-dyneema.html that has a removable hip belt.  When bringing photography equipment, I replace the hip belt with a Think tank belt and attach my Think Tank holsters, lens bags and accessory bags as needed to the exposed side portions of the belt.  This gives me an ultralight backpack with the ability to add photo gear as needed and the camera and lenses are readily accessible in the side holsters.

Interesting!  What about when it rains?

28
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 18, 2014, 04:55:30 PM »
Carrying plenty of water is dependent on the environment, particularly the temps and the availability of water along the trail.  I carried between 4L and 6L of water depending on whether trail camps were dry or not.  We also carried a Katydyn Water Filter and purification tablets as backup.

Everything in your pack should be protected from water in dry bags, ziplock bags, etc, esp your sleep gear.  If your water bladder spang a leak, that should be no different than if the pack fell into a river or stream or got drenched in a rain storm.

The external pockets and configuration of my Kelty backpack allows me to use my MSR Dromedary 3L bladder on the outside of my pack but otherwise it would be on the inside like most other folks.

29
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 18, 2014, 04:36:42 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html

What kind of trip are you taking?  A 35 Liter pack isn't very big and it will be even smaller after you put in camera gear.  A 35 liter pack is usually only big enough for warm weather weekend trips.  Will you have to carry a tent, sleep gear, etc or are you just doing day hikes?  I really hope you are already an experienced hiker/camper so you know what you're doing on the trail.  Remember that back country pro photographers sometimes hire assistants to help them carry gear when necessary.  Don't over do the gear carrying it by yourself!

30
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« on: July 18, 2014, 04:29:19 PM »
you are much better off using a proper backpack and putting your camera gear in it. or strap a small camera back to your backpack. you will not have a good time trying to pack weight in a camera bag. i just put my lenses in their soft cases in the lid of my gregory pack, and hang my camera in a dry-sack (brooks bag) off a shoulder strap, or on a capture clip if its dry out.

you arent going to get a hiking backpack on as carryon

Big Ditto!  In this case, it is hiking/camping FIRST PRIORITY, photography DISTANT SECOND.  Keep yourself comfortable and safe first, then consider the photography.

This means buying everything for the camping first, especially the backpack.  Hiking with the wrong or improper fitting pack is a huge mistake.  DO NOT BUY A PHOTOGRAPHY PACK FOR CAMPING!!

I just finished a 70+ mile 10 day trek at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico (2nd time).  I used a Kelty RedCloud 90 backpack.  Depending on Food and Water variables, I carried between 40 - 60 lbs on the trail and about 6 lbs of that was the camera gear.  I carried a Canon SL1 with a Tamron 18-270 lens, a 10-22 EF-S lens and extra batteries.  The extra lens was in a LowePro lens bag inside a dry bag inside my pack where ever it would fit.  The camera hung flat against my chest from a custom made rig of super magnets and flex straps that were connected to my back pack shoulder straps.  When I wasn't hiking, the camera simply hung from a climbing carbiner that hung from my belt at hip level.  I also had a dry bag in case I needed to protect the camera but I never used it.

In other words, keep it simple.  Don't try to take all your gear, just the essentials.  Abundant water is more important weight to carry than camera gear.

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