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1
Better than BlackRapid. If you don't want to look like a Commando in full militia gear ready to invade Poland, take a look at the stylish HoldFast Money Maker. A bit pricey, but you won't find a better dual (or even triple) camera strap:

http://holdfastgear.com/?products/money-maker.html

Count me out. That thing looks uncomfortable, and weird. Clark Kent   8)

BlackRapid is my suggestion as well. They just released another double strap that's perfect for my new EOS-M + 6D!

2
EOS-M / Re: Cases FOR EOS M + 22
« on: July 06, 2013, 08:56:15 PM »
Update:  I actually got a steal on a Lowepro Edit 110 which is a perfect fit for me.

I have an Edit 100 for my camcorder (Canon Vixia HF M41) - it also holds a directional mic, video light, spare battery, CPL, etc.  I think it'd be too big for the EOS M + 22mm that's being delivered to me next week; the Edit 110 would be way overkill, for me.

For my camera, I mean.  ;)

Hi, just want to say I love you

/thread

3
Very limited range. The crop shooters might be better off with two smaller and faster primes.

This lens will probably be around $1000 +/- 200.  50mm (~300) + 35mm 1.4 (900+). I don't know. I would probably stick with the single zoom when it comes to beginners and convenience

4
Regardless of the nay-sayers. This lens is awesome. Forget about the kit lens that comes with canon rebels. Once the new M comes out I will marry this lens to it!

5
Lenses / Re: New review of the Sigma 30mm f/1.4
« on: April 17, 2013, 01:08:52 AM »
Sigma is killing it!

6
CF > SD

C'mon. Stop supporting CF tech. SD is catching up in a more reliable and convenient package and on top of that its less expensive. At the current speeds they both are way passed practical speeds from what current cameras offer. Let CF die...

My d30 is CF only and I need to support CF until another format like XQD is adopted on canon. SD really sucks on the mk3.

Haha I see ::) I just want camera manufacturers to stop CF slots. It'll save them space for other electronics and it'll make our end a lot easier when all cameras have the same standard and computers can easily take SD.  ;D

7
CF > SD

C'mon. Stop supporting CF tech. SD is catching up in a more reliable and convenient package and on top of that its less expensive. At the current speeds they both are way passed practical speeds from what current cameras offer. Let CF die...

8
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS 7D L Announced, Shipping in May
« on: April 01, 2013, 09:22:31 AM »
Really? We're all 12 years old now? *sigh*

Okay, just because it's a joke, doesn't mean we can slack off people:
I'm switching to Nikon.


You obviously didn't find Google's joke funny then.

9
Lighting / Re: First external flash? Lots of beginner's questions!
« on: March 28, 2013, 01:44:31 AM »
Wow, thanks for all the great replies! :) I have read through all the posts, and I guess I'll be going for the 600EX-RT (I saw that one person suggested a Yongnuo unit), the Speedliter's handbook, and The Black Foamie Thing (!). I'll also get a nice stand, umbrellas and reflectors when I get to know my flash a bit better.

Also: If I'm going to a multi-flash setup down the road, would the only sane thing be to add more 600EX-RTs due to the RF? Would just like to know what I'm committing myself to.

Thank you so much, everyone! If I've forgotten anything, or if there's anything else a flash newbie should know, feel free to post it here!

I would strongly recommend against it, and put another +1 for Yongnuo.  You don’t know whether or not you’ll get into flash, or off-camera flash, and the 600 is a big investment.  Especially when you start adding in light stands, modifiers and a host of other supplies.  Get a cheap flash, if you end up getting into off-camera flash you’ll end up owning a lot more than one, so it won’t go to waste.

Personally I’d grab that refurb 430exII that was mentioned above.  It’s a reliable Canon (it is nice to have a reliable flash or two), you’ll have eTTL on-camera, and cash left over for accessories and the inevitable second flash you’ll get if you get into it.  I’d take some of that money and buy some cheap wireless triggers.  I love my Yongnuo RF-602s, but if I was to rebuy today I’d probably drop a little more cash for the 622s with eTTL.  The nice thing about the 602s is they’re dirt cheap ($25 for a set), so you can outfit a bunch of strobes for cheap.  If you grabbed that refurb 430 ($200) and a set of 602s ($25), you could be in a grand total of $300 for wireless flash with a stand, umbrella, and some accessories.  You don’t need off-camera eTTL to start.  And if you want to upgrade to an eTTL wireless, the 602s won’t set you back much, and you can always use them as a remote shutter trigger.  When you’re looking to expand your lighting setup, don’t hesitate to fill out your strobe lineup with some cheap Yongnuos, not every strobe needs to be high end.  I have a Canon 430 and 580, and Yongnuo 460 (2X) and 580 (can’t remember if that’s the number).  If I need eTTL or reliability, I grab a Canon.  When I need to put a light over water or stuck up on a pole, I grab a YN.  When I’m doing more complex lighting I use the basic YN 460s for background lighting or adding more juice, while the Canon speedlites are there for key and fill that needs to be more delicately controlled.  It works.

I'd also highly recommend spending some time reading Strobist, there is a wealth of information on that site and it doesn't suffer for the gearism that is on this one.  Edit:  just saw this was already mentioned.  It's worth stating twice, awesome site.

The point I suggested the 600RT is mainly for ETTL and future-proofing his investment. Yes, you can also do the 430ex, but the main point is for ETTL because of your moving subjects. I wouldn't go for a third party now, because you need reliable flash right now

10
I checked, it says 1920x1080 resolution. :)

It says 2560 x 1440 on Apple website.

11
Seriously, some guy just said "very rarely do people shoot in high iso"....are you kidding me?

To be fair, what he said was above ISO 6400.  I suspect he's true, only because until the most recent Canon bodies, shooting above ISO 6400 gave unusable results.  That's not true anymore.  On my 1D X, ISO 6400 is the new ISO 800.   ;)

>.< true I guess, but it would be nice if Canon did continue the improvement of its high ISO. Hah true, even 12800 saved me a couple of times.

12
Its about time Canon responded to the Nikon D800 and D800E. This fixation with high ISO, low DR, and high noise needs to stop. We need a quality camera to bring back the 1Ds range, a camera that is best in class.

For whatever reason Canon have been asleep at the wheel for a while now and its time they woke up. I have no wish for ISO extremes, nor do I shoot video at all, but I do shoot landscapes, so want a camera that has a minimum of noise and world beating DR. Maybe removal of the anti-aliassing filter?

It's a valid fixation.  There are many more sports and wedding photographers than landscape photographers.  Hence why Canon has dominated the market.

+1. Seriously, some guy just said "very rarely do people shoot in high iso"....are you kidding me? I'm not a sports photographer but UNDERSTAND the market Canon dominates. Sports photography is all about high ISO, high shutter! Just because you don't use it doesn't mean others don't.

Edit: Also whose to say by working in high ISO Canon won't create a new standard of where ISO 800 will produce as clean as an image as ISO 100 and so on as the years progress. You want to stop this improvement because of why?

13
Lighting / Re: First external flash? Lots of beginner's questions!
« on: March 25, 2013, 03:06:07 PM »
Wow, thanks for all the great replies! :) I have read through all the posts, and I guess I'll be going for the 600EX-RT (I saw that one person suggested a Yongnuo unit), the Speedliter's handbook, and The Black Foamie Thing (!). I'll also get a nice stand, umbrellas and reflectors when I get to know my flash a bit better.

Also: If I'm going to a multi-flash setup down the road, would the only sane thing be to add more 600EX-RTs due to the RF? Would just like to know what I'm committing myself to.

Thank you so much, everyone! If I've forgotten anything, or if there's anything else a flash newbie should know, feel free to post it here!

I would continue with the Canon RF system down the road. While you get used to flash by the time you feel pretty secure about your skills with one, Canon might have less expensive version of the 600-RT out.

14
Lighting / Re: First external flash? Lots of beginner's questions!
« on: March 25, 2013, 01:03:54 AM »

Incorrect.  The 60D has a popup flash, so you could use a single speedlight off camera in slave mode without additional equipment.

I would also recommend the 600RT, though.  The fact that Canon has finally introduced a radio capable speedlight makes it worth its weight alone.  You could also look into strobes.  Paul Buff products are fantastic.


Thanks for the correction!

15
Lighting / Re: First external flash? Lots of beginner's questions!
« on: March 24, 2013, 11:54:33 PM »
Hi all,

Started a similar thread over at DPReviews.com. Posting this here as well, to get as much good advice/many good answers as possible.

Just watched a few YouTube videos on flash photography, and found them to be very interesting. I've never used external flash before. I have a Canon EOS 60D and a Fujifilm FinePix X100, and I mainly shoot portraits of friends and family, as well as my dog (using a 50mm f/1.2L and a 24-70 f/2.8L), in addition to some street and landscape with my X100. I'm looking into buying my first external flash (would love a multi-flash setup later), and would like some advice on which one to get. This is mainly for my 60D and portrait/dog photography (compatibility with my X100 would be nice, but not at all required). I don't mind paying more for more features, but if a flash has features I'm never going to use, I'd rather spend my money elsewhere (or on several flash units).

Apart from specific advice on what flash to get, I have a few other questions:

i) What do I need for them to sync wirelessly with my 60D? (Does this require a 'master' unit sitting on the camera?)
ii) Are Canon Speedlites better than third-party alternatives in any way?
iii) What should I look for, specs-wise?
iv) I can afford a 600EX-RT, but I'm guessing there are features I'm guaranteed never to use, and that I'm better off spending money on several other units?
v) Are there any 'must-have' flash accessories?

Thanks a lot, and I apologize in advance for all the questions!

My two cents.

Only real advantage Canon Speedlight has over third party is ETTL - which tells the flash the "correct" amount of flash FILL power to throw unto the scene.

Seeing as you will be photographing moving subjects then this might be a good advantage for you. I'm not too familiar with the 60D but looking at a quick glimpse I see it has no pop-up flash which means you need a master for Off-Camera. With that fact alone, I would go with the Canon 600-Ex-RT. ATM it's not much more than the 580 plus. You will also want the ST-E3-RT at minimum. It will trigger the 600 pretty reliably from what I hear. This will all come out to about $900. Instead of the ST-E3-RT you can do a second 600-Ex-RT to take advantage of IR focus assist (patch coming soon) and extra fill.

To Add: You don't NEED extra modifiers but I would recommend a Rogue Large FlashBender + Diffuser Panel ($45 for handheld Off-Camera, plus it's sweet how versatile it is); a light stand; diffuser umbrella (has a removable cover); umbrella adapter; and a 5 in 1 reflector.

Also re-reading your post, the 600-EX-RT is definitely the way to go if you want to add more flashes later. We should hopefully see a 430 - RT version of the less expensive flash.

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