October 22, 2014, 10:30:14 AM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - pierceography

Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8 ... 16
76
Lenses / Re: 50mm: Wich one?
« on: March 26, 2013, 01:19:17 PM »
The bokeh is much better on the 1.4, though the 1.8 is supposed to be a bit sharper wide open.

Personally, I never cared for the plastic mount, which is why I went straight for the 1.4.  But I recently sold my Canon 1.4 for the Sigma f/1.4.  I find the Sigma to be a bit sharper, with better contrast.  But it's hit or miss whether you get a good copy.  My second copy of the Sigma was much better than the first.

77
Lenses / Re: Also chasing Tack Sharp
« on: March 25, 2013, 11:20:01 PM »
If you want sharp wide open, you can't go wrong with the 85mm f/1.2L II.  You obviously pay to play with the 85, but mine is incredibly sharp even at 1.2... Significantly more so than any Canon 50mm.

The 135mm f/2L is also incredibly sharp open as well... More so than the 85, and the pictures that come out of that lens are something else.

I hear good things about the Sigma 35mm f/1.4.  I hope to get one soon myself.

78
Lenses / Re: Prime vs zoom
« on: March 25, 2013, 10:01:54 PM »
It really depends on what I'm shooting.  If I can afford to, primes all the way.  However, there are plenty of conditions where you simply have to have a zoom.

If I can take my time and prepare for don't have to rush to swap lenses, I'll stick with my 50, 85, 100, or 135.  However, if I'm on foot (exploring a city), I'll usually stick with my 24-70mm.

So for me, it's really a combination of both!  But if I had to pick, I prefer the picture quality of my primes.

79
Software & Accessories / Re: Nik Software worth it?
« on: March 25, 2013, 07:19:16 PM »
I've been wanting to try Nik for awhile (I hear nothing but good things about Silver Efex).  $126 is too good of a deal to pass up.

80
Lenses / Re: Best tele prime for full frame?
« on: March 25, 2013, 03:10:56 PM »
I own the 70-200mm 2.8 ii, 100mm f/2.8L, and 135mm f/2L.  The latter of which I just recently purchased.  I honestly never thought I'd have a place for it in my bag given that I already owned the 70-200 AND the 100mm macro.  But good lord is the 135mm amazing.  Just the best bokeh you could imagine, and it's incredible for street photography because of its smaller profile and extra reach (over the 100mm).

Not sure if you mentioned what camera you'll be using, but with my 5Dm3 I never wish I had IS on the 135.  The f/2 allows for decent shutter speeds even in low light, and with the high ISO capabilities of the 5Dm3 I wouldn't bat an eye at cranking it all the way up to 12,800... especially if you go b&w -- the extra grain gives it a nice feel.

So +1 for the 135mm f/2L from me.

81
Lighting / Re: First external flash? Lots of beginner's questions!
« on: March 25, 2013, 12:16:13 AM »
I'm not too familiar with the 60D but looking at a quick glimpse I see it has no pop-up flash which means you need a master for Off-Camera.

Incorrect.  The 60D has a popup flash, so you could use a single speedlight off camera in slave mode without additional equipment.

I would also recommend the 600RT, though.  The fact that Canon has finally introduced a radio capable speedlight makes it worth its weight alone.  You could also look into strobes.  Paul Buff products are fantastic.

82
Lighting / Re: Einstein Setup
« on: March 23, 2013, 01:06:28 AM »
You guys are really killing my budget.  (But being a photography nerd this comes a no surprise).  :-)

But thank you for the advice!  I'm pretty exited to get started with my own "studio".  I've been almost all natural light to this point, and looking forward to the next challenge.

My current plan is the single Einstein with my speedlight, and hopefully upgrade from there where I need it.  But it's pretty hard to lay off the lens upgrade bug.... Got that 35mm Siggy in mind, and the 24mm ts-e too. :-)

83
Lighting / Einstein Setup
« on: March 22, 2013, 11:04:22 PM »
I finally ordered the PCB Einstein and CyberSync Commander I've been eying for awhile tonight.  I plan on doing a fairly basic setup in my basement as a small studio to play around with lighting.  I also have a 580ex II that I'll use in slave mode as a secondary light.

Most (all) of my experience aside from having my speedlight in the hotshoe is natural light.

So what advice can anyone offer to a beginner at off camera lighting?

Thanks, guys!  :-)

84
Lenses / Re: 24-70 IS ii v 70-200 IS ii
« on: March 21, 2013, 05:09:16 PM »
I was in the same boat five months ago.  Already owned the 24-70mm f/2.8L, and was trying to decide between upgrading to the mark 2, or buy a 70-200mm f/2.8L II.  I didn't have enough capital for both, and eventually decided to go with the versatility of having both lenses over just the 24-70ii.  Hard to take pictures between 70 and 200mm when you don't have a lens in that range.  :-)

That being said, I currently have my 24-70mm mk1 on craigslist and hope someone bites before this current rebate expires.  I'm really hoping to pick up the mark 2 before the end of the month.

85
Good lord, this is why I need to stay away from the Canon forums for a few days after an announcement.  If you guys took pictures half as well as you whined about Canon, you'd all be professionals (and ironically, would complain far less about rebel series SLRs).

instead we all take crap pictures like you and complain about no innovation at canon....


Taking pictures > complaining.

well your not taking pictures right now, you are arguing here... so what?

when you are so good at giving advices... why not following them yourself?  :P

I'm at work, buddy.  I like to catch a few discussion threads in here when possible, usually to glean whatever I can from the more experienced members.

Like quite a few members of this forum, I use it as a learning tool -- particularly when I don't have my camera with me, such as my paid profession.  I take exception to those who prefer to clog the channels with their complaints about Canon gear.

I learned a long time ago that you shouldn't complain about the decisions you make.  I made the decision to invest in Canon gear.  Of course, I don't always agree with their product direction... but overall I am happy with my gear and feel it suits me.  If I ever feel differently, there's a very simple solution.

But "your" right... I should follow my own advice.  I'm definitely the one with too much time on my hands.

86
Good lord, this is why I need to stay away from the Canon forums for a few days after an announcement.  If you guys took pictures half as well as you whined about Canon, you'd all be professionals (and ironically, would complain far less about rebel series SLRs).

instead we all take crap pictures like you and complain about no innovation at canon....


Taking pictures > complaining.

87
Good lord, this is why I need to stay away from the Canon forums for a few days after an announcement.  If you guys took pictures half as well as you whined about Canon, you'd all be professionals (and ironically, would complain far less about rebel series SLRs).

88
Canon General / Re: website concept: proSLRs.com
« on: March 20, 2013, 02:53:32 PM »
In theory, it's a good idea.  But like the other posters have mentioned, it's an uphill battle.  In my experience (Application Developer), creating the content management side is easy.  Creating the content and building a subscriber/user, that's an entirely separate -- and exponentially more difficult -- endeavor.

Some questions:

* How would you entice professional photographers to review equipment on your site?  To start, I imagine this site would have low traffic and small user base, so for a professional photographer to take time away from their job, you'd likely have to pay them.
* How would you manage the content?  Would it be a free for all, or would you have an administrator?
* What would be your source of revenue?  Ads are great, but given the saturation of market (I mean, you're posting this idea through a competitor) I can't imagine you would recoup your investment (time, capital, etc) very quickly.

Frankly, this idea kind of sounds like facebook for photographers.  Which, again, isn't a bad idea... but having built these sorts of tools in the past, I can guarantee getting it off the ground would be more challenging than you think.

Hey Pierce,

Thanks for your thoughts! You're right, the primary factor in getting an idea like this off the ground would be finding the professional photographers to write reviews. I have access to this, so the secondary factor which comes up as you mentioned is of course SEO.

I don't believe revenue would be a requirement here, at least at first. Perhaps referral links to cameras on B&H or something could be one source, which wouldn't be banner-based (ldeal). What do you think?

Graham

If you already have professional photographers willing to do reviews on your (theoretical) site, then you already have small piece in place.  In regards to SEO, I would have the photographers write reviews that would exclusively live on your site.  Then the photographers could link to your site in their blogs/websites.  This would provide a valuable SEO boost.  In this context, link backs (depending on the source) can be more valuable than content.

But I'm still skeptical about the overall "business plan" aspect of it.  If the site becomes as popular as you envision it, revenue would be a side effect of popularity.  It's hard to have a popular website with a large user base and high SEO ranking and not be able to pull in revenue.  Sure you can say you're not interested in making money off it, but that will immediately put you at a disadvantage to your competition.

Would it be a useful site?  Sure, but useful doesn't always (and frankly rarely) translates into successful.  Take this forum for instance.  It has almost all the content you're looking to build your site around -- professional reviews/photos from all forms of photographers, featured stories/articles, and just about every opinion you could ask for.  Granted, it's lacking in organization, but I wouldn't see myself gravitating towards another site with less content and better organization.  Most of us have developed skills for sifting through loosely organized data, and unfortunately have an attention span reflective of that.  So your primary challenge will be two fold: attracting users to your site, and convincing them to stay.

And don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to be negative here... just realistic.  I've spent hundreds of hours of my own time writing my site from scratch with a hoard of useful features that no other site on the Internet offers.  And to date, the only regular visitors I get are my wife, my mother, and myself.  But I knew that going in.  I wanted a web application where I could quickly access all (and by all I mean 32,000 and counting) photos I've taken and organize/view/manage them from anywhere.  It works great, and more importantly I had fun building it.  But I never had an expectation that it would become wildly popular and be the next facebook for photographers.  I just enjoy writing software.

But that being said, I look forward to seeing what you can put together.  :-)

89
Canon General / Re: website concept: proSLRs.com
« on: March 20, 2013, 12:29:44 PM »
In theory, it's a good idea.  But like the other posters have mentioned, it's an uphill battle.  In my experience (Application Developer), creating the content management side is easy.  Creating the content and building a subscriber/user, that's an entirely separate -- and exponentially more difficult -- endeavor.

Some questions:

* How would you entice professional photographers to review equipment on your site?  To start, I imagine this site would have low traffic and small user base, so for a professional photographer to take time away from their job, you'd likely have to pay them.
* How would you manage the content?  Would it be a free for all, or would you have an administrator?
* What would be your source of revenue?  Ads are great, but given the saturation of market (I mean, you're posting this idea through a competitor) I can't imagine you would recoup your investment (time, capital, etc) very quickly.

Frankly, this idea kind of sounds like facebook for photographers.  Which, again, isn't a bad idea... but having built these sorts of tools in the past, I can guarantee getting it off the ground would be more challenging than you think.

90
I bought my first SLR (t1i which was quickly upgraded to a 7D) in 2009.  I've never been paid outside of my employer throwing me some "lens donation" money for a few city scape shots to hang in our conference rooms.  Though that isn't to say I wouldn't want to get paid, but my actual profession keeps me too busy to consider ever doing it outside of the occasional weekend shoot.

Photography is just something I like to dump a lot of my "allowance" into... as well as fend of questions/sarcastic jabs from my wife about why I insist in hauling a ridiculous amount of camera equipment with me when we go on vacation.  ;-)

Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8 ... 16