February 01, 2015, 08:37:55 AM

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Messages - sagittariansrock

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46
EOS Bodies / Re: NEW CAMERA - EOS 80D?
« on: January 08, 2015, 04:07:31 PM »
The dial looks like a P&S or Eos M. But the body looks too bulky to be a mirrorless.
Maybe a newer version of the superzoom Powershots?

47
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters...

A variable ND filter is a pair of stacked polarizers (one circular, one linear), and the 'Maltese cross' has the same cause as the uneven polarization of skies with UWA lenses, except you don't need a sky to see it.
Thanks for the info...didn't know that. So the potential issues may be shared between CPL and VND, but not with a standard (non-variable) ND, yes?
Correct.  Standard NDs have no such issues.  The only potential issues are vignetting and flare (like any filter) and difficulty focusing (leave them off until you've focused).  Oh and forgetting to take them off - my favorite issue.  I was looking through my viewfinder for a cityscape shot the other night and it looked really dark.  Plus, my shutter speed was a flashing 30s!  A quick look at the BLACK filter on the front of my lens made me realize my mistake!  I do this with polarizers, too, not to mention trying to shoot wildlife at f/16 sometimes, and the list goes on...

I make this mistake quite often with my personal polarizers/ND filters- aka my sunglasses. I'd walk into a shop and wonder why they don't they have all the lights on...

48
Live view users: wear a broad brimmed hat - helps immensely in reducing glare - and prevents sun-exposure skin cancers.

Dunno why, as soon as I wear a hat I have this itch to shoot in portrait mode and the hat brim interfere :(

49
On a limited budget. I have the big stopper,  foundation system, and a 3 stop nd soft grad filter (also a screw on 3 stop nd and circ polarizer)...but was wondering if I need to get a 3 stop nd hard grad?? Can the soft grad do flat horizons ok. I have watched the majority of Lee nd grad videos as well as their online Inspiration magazine and still am undecided about my next step. I have money for 1 more filter.

I have a hard 3 stop and a soft 2 stop. The ideal condition is the opposite, but what I have works for me.
In your case, I'd suggest going for a 2 stop hard grad. That will be perfect. And you can always mix and match.

50
Quote
I bought a cpl and use it for his purpose, one filter less to carry around.

In case the OP doesn't know, CPL's start producing strange color gradation when used on ultrawides like the 10-22mm. Not sure what the "minimum safe lens length" is. 24mm?

It is caused when the field of view of the lens covers a large area of sky, wide enough so that the effect of polarization varies significantly (maximum perpendicular to the sun, minimum parallel to the sun's rays). So, as long as your composition doesn't cover too much of the sky, you should be fine.

51
Lee makes a full range of solid ND filters:
http://www.leefilters.com/index.php/camera/bigstopper

I know of those two. 6 stops are too much for video (sometimes). Looking for a 2 and a 3 stop solid filter in addition to the "Stoppers".

Scroll down the page- they make all kinds of ND filters from 1 stop to 3 stops in half stop variants (though the half stop ones are hard to find). They make 2 and 3 stop glass ones, which are more expensive.
For example:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?ntt=resin&refineSearchString=&atclk=ND+Combinations_Standard+NDs&ci=114&N=4026728350+4291378429+4294951825+4242329417

52
I am also looking into Lee Filters. I want to use them both for photography and with a mattebox when shooting video, so the 4x4 size makes sense for me.

I don't see any "normal" solid NDs on Lee's site. Will the hard grads cover the whole image when positioned properly? By looking at the images they don't seem big enough for this.

If not, that seems like an oversight in such a mature system...

The hard grads are not supposed to cover the whole image evenly in any position unless maybe you have a 46mm filter thread.
Lee makes a full range of solid ND filters:
http://www.leefilters.com/index.php/camera/bigstopper

53
That's a good point, although I've found that in daytime, live view exposure simulation allows me to compose/focus through the 10-stop filter.

Do you use a Z finder or something like that? I am finding live view composition really difficult in bright sun light... :(

54
Hi!

Husband has offered to build me a camera gear cabinet (husband's hobby is carpentry, he is pretty good at building furniture). I am thinking something like a tall dresser, lots of drawers, perhaps lined with the pluck-foam we find in pelican cases. 

Anyone have something similar or some other suggestions? Right now, I keep my main camera with one lens inside an easily accessible camera bag, everything else in a large pelican case, inside a closet. Not too bad but not the most convenient.

Cabinet would have to fit two bodies (5DIII and 50D), 50 f1.4, 35f1.4L, kit 18-135, 70-200f4IS L, 135f2L, filters, chargers, extra batteries, grips, 2 flashes. A little room to grow.

Thanks in advance!

Don't have many suggestions at the moment, but please do share the final result.
One thing comes to mind- make sure there is sufficient ventilation. Dark un-aerated places harbor fungi.
Very curious to know how it turns out.

55
There's one more advantage to Lee filters: you will need to make all adjustments without a 10-stop ND filter, which is opaque for practical purposes, and it is much easier to slide it in rather than screwing it in.
However, if you are not using graduated filters, then this advantage is probably not enough to counter all the hassles of a square filter system.
I have a 6-stop Hitech and a 10-stop Lee, and the former gets very little use. I do plan to switch to the 6-stop Lee sometime in the future, now that it is available.

56
Why a battery?  Perhaps I missed/forgot, are you planning remote outdoor use?   I've not had a need for a battery pack yet, AC power does fine, with an extension cord if needed.

Since I still don't have a studio set up (will happen after I move in a couple of months) and will probably shoot in other locations (probably less commonly outdoors), I felt it will be less limiting not to rely on AC power. Having said that, a battery pack will definitely not be immediately necessary if and when I get the mono.

None that I'm aware of for studio use.  Outdoors, in bright light with only a weak triggering flash pointed away from the monolight, maybe it would be an issue.  I've not had the Einstein fail to optically trigger.  In a venue with other photographers firing flashes, optical triggering would be a problem.   

Thanks, that's very reassuring. Whatever I end up deciding, it looks like there will be a lot of optical slavery with the 600s :)

I find the 15° grid more useful, personally.

Some manufacturers name it a bit differently- so I guess the one with closer spacing is the one I want?

Just another option to consider.

Thanks for the suggestion, and I've heard a lot about Elinchroms and Profotos- their quality of light and the vast array of great modifiers. But I think that might lie some way ahead for me, as they far surpass my budget and my knowledge of lighting. I think cheaper lights will suffice for me to understand the basics of shaping light. 

For 15 years I shot Speedotron (black line) equipment before switching to Profoto.  In general, Speedotron is very well built and lasts.  The deals you linked are decent.  Both are brown line, which is lower quality than their black line...but similarly well built.  The problem as I see it is that Speedotron is disappearing.  Helix (here in Chicago) was where I got my gear originally...and they are gone.  So, buying older equipment from Ebay can leave you with trouble finding service/parts.  However, at their price point, it's not a bad deal at all IMHO.

Thanks for the advice. It is a good point re older systems. Given their newness PCBs might be better.
As I mentioned above, I was really intrigued by the Godox AD 360s. They are compact and powerful enough for my needs. There are nagging worries about QC (which can hopefully be negated somewhat by getting it from Cheetah), but otherwise no one seems to have a bad word for those. However, it seems like Godox might come up with a  TTL version, and since I can afford to wait a couple of months that might make sense.
Alternatively, there seem to be a bunch of cheaper studio lights that are getting great reviews- starting from the $ 100-sh Godox 300 (300 Ws) to the $ 600 Flashpoint Rovelight with incorporated battery. Their reviews are also pretty good- seems like there are lots of very good choices. I will probably wait for the TTL AD 360 and maybe add a cheaper mono (like the 300) as well afterwards. That should suffice for 2015.
Good thing is most of these have Bowens mounts- so I think I shall go ahead and get myself Wafer adapters for that mount.

57
Lenses / Re: Canon 35mm F2 IS image quality
« on: January 05, 2015, 07:11:08 PM »
Technically, it's this change in distance that changes the perspective.  But, it's the change in focal length that necessitates the change in distance to capture two images of the same subject that fills the frame.  Because filling the frame with your subject is typically understood as a given for such a comparison, then focal length does affect perspective.

Perspective depends on subject distance alone, technically and practically.
One might have numerous reasons for wanting to change the subject distance- in your example you are trying to frame the subject similarly with a lens of a different focal length. In another example, I might want to have the same amount of DoF with a different aperture (let’s say you want to take a photo with a 85mm lens and due to the low lighting conditions you need to use f/1.2. Instead of shooting from where you’re at, you step a few feet back to ensure that everything will be in focus. Would you say that the aperture changed the perspective in this case? You might say that in my example the framing is changed while in your case it stayed the same. The misconception about focal length affecting perspective might arise from the fact that one equates perspective with framing. While the focal length dictates framing (as it directly controls the angle of view and therefore controls the field of view at a given distance), focal length doesn’t affect perspective. It is merely one of the reasons that cause us to alter the subject distance.

OK, technically FL doesn't affect perspective directly (just like sensor size doesn't affect DoF), but FL dictates framing and distance, so the perspective will change anyway. What if the background is far away or even close to infinity (like moon)? Running around won't really change the perspective, but the FL will affect it.



Technically, or otherwise, FL doesn't affect perspective directly, or indirectly. It can only affect our motivation to alter the subject distance. There are uncountable other factors that may motivate us to do the same, such as aperture in my example.
As I said earlier, you are equating framing with perspective. If the background is near infinity, running towards it will alter the perspective, but in an entirely negligible amount. After all, you are altering the subject distance only by 1/infinite amount. On the other hand, altering the focal length will merely change how much of the background you can see- which has nothing to do with perspective. Framing is NOT equivalent to perspective.
Perspective is HOW a subject looks at a certain distance. Framing is HOW MUCH of the subject you can see from that distance. If you don't change the subject distance, the subject will look exactly the same irrespective of focal lengths used, as PBD's illustration shows. What will change is how much you have to crop away in order for the images to look similar.


58
Lenses / Re: Canon 35mm F2 IS image quality
« on: January 03, 2015, 09:05:23 PM »
Technically, it's this change in distance that changes the perspective.  But, it's the change in focal length that necessitates the change in distance to capture two images of the same subject that fills the frame.  Because filling the frame with your subject is typically understood as a given for such a comparison, then focal length does affect perspective.

Perspective depends on subject distance alone, technically and practically.
One might have numerous reasons for wanting to change the subject distance- in your example you are trying to frame the subject similarly with a lens of a different focal length. In another example, I might want to have the same amount of DoF with a different aperture (let’s say you want to take a photo with a 85mm lens and due to the low lighting conditions you need to use f/1.2. Instead of shooting from where you’re at, you step a few feet back to ensure that everything will be in focus. Would you say that the aperture changed the perspective in this case? You might say that in my example the framing is changed while in your case it stayed the same. The misconception about focal length affecting perspective might arise from the fact that one equates perspective with framing. While the focal length dictates framing (as it directly controls the angle of view and therefore controls the field of view at a given distance), focal length doesn’t affect perspective. It is merely one of the reasons that cause us to alter the subject distance.

59
I'd go with the TS-E 17/4 on an FF sensor. I agree 100% with all the points PBD has made, but I find the versatility of the wider FL more useful (and I am not very good with shift stitching yet, plus shift stitching a 17 makes an 11, which is great!). The tilt function of the 24mm is probably more effective, and the ability to use filters is a big plus, but when I am trying to bring everything into focus the former is less of an issue and I haven't really mastered the use of ND grads yet for the latter to be a big inconvenience (and even then there's the Wonderpana system). Also, the use of the TCs make this lens into a 24 and 34mm lens, which are great focal lengths.

60
Lighting / Re: ANOTHER ONE OF MY DIY, CHEAP LED RING LIGHT.
« on: January 03, 2015, 10:04:55 AM »
scrunchie= an elastic amorphous looking band that your mother/wife/daughter uses for tying hair and leaves here and there and completely forgets (since they have dozens of this) until you use it for some useful purpose (such as tying plastic bags to flashes)- and then they yell at you for stealing it...

I was getting interested in creating an LED ring light and acquired a nice circular ring of plastic (I think covered a Kodak carousel or something) and was planning to buy LED light strips on eBay- however I found this and it is cheap enough ($ 34) to make me choose it instead of DIY-ing:
http://www.amazon.com/NEEWER®-Macro-Ring-LED-Light/dp/B0031AQ302

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