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Messages - Famateur

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136
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters...

A variable ND filter is a pair of stacked polarizers (one circular, one linear), and the 'Maltese cross' has the same cause as the uneven polarization of skies with UWA lenses, except you don't need a sky to see it.
Thanks for the info...didn't know that. So the potential issues may be shared between CPL and VND, but not with a standard (non-variable) ND, yes?
Correct.  Standard NDs have no such issues.  The only potential issues are vignetting and flare (like any filter) and difficulty focusing (leave them off until you've focused).  Oh and forgetting to take them off - my favorite issue.  I was looking through my viewfinder for a cityscape shot the other night and it looked really dark.  Plus, my shutter speed was a flashing 30s!  A quick look at the BLACK filter on the front of my lens made me realize my mistake!  I do this with polarizers, too, not to mention trying to shoot wildlife at f/16 sometimes, and the list goes on...

LOL...I've done that a few times with sunglasses on, looking at the live view exposure and wondering why it was so dark.  :P

Speaking of polarizers, one day I thought the screen on my G12 was going out because it would turn off (go black) when I rotated it to view portrait shots (it has an accelerometer to auto-rotate the image). Every time I'd rotate, it would go dark. It took a minute to realize that it was the polarization of my sunglasses that was making it "go dark". LOL...

137
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters...

A variable ND filter is a pair of stacked polarizers (one circular, one linear), and the 'Maltese cross' has the same cause as the uneven polarization of skies with UWA lenses, except you don't need a sky to see it.
Thanks for the info...didn't know that. So the potential issues may be shared between CPL and VND, but not with a standard (non-variable) ND, yes?

138
Photography Technique / Re: How to Expose and get sharp Focus of Moon
« on: January 07, 2015, 04:24:37 PM »
Thanks for the confirmations of my supposition. It helps me, too.  :P

139
Photography Technique / Re: How to Expose and get sharp Focus of Moon
« on: January 07, 2015, 03:53:12 PM »

Good input!  I did NOT turn IS off, even though I know better.  :(   I'll try again tonight with what remains of the full moon.

Thanks!

I'm not an astro-shooter, either, but not having a full moon might actually help your quest for sharpness and detail. You won't get a perfectly round moon, but you'll get shadows on the craters near the waning edge that will increase the contrast of the details. Just a thought...

140
This is the perfect discussion for me.  I have the 10-22mm and I was going to buy a tiffen 77mm variable ND filter.  But if I can't use it at <24mm (I'm assuming FF values) then what's the point.  I was planning on using it for blurring clouds and waves... It seems like the best value for money?
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters; from this thread, it sounds like some have been successful in using such a setup without artifacts). I think the confusion came because a CPL reduces exposure by a couple of stops, so you can use it in place of a 2-stop ND filter.

Quote
I bought a cpl and use it for his purpose, one filter less to carry around.
In case the OP doesn't know, CPL's start producing strange color gradation when used on ultrawides like the 10-22mm. Not sure what the "minimum safe lens length" is. 24mm?

141
Wow. Technology is amazing, but we often forget that engineers and scientists are the imaginative creators of the technology, and they are what truly amaze me.

Can't wait to see what we have in another 15-20 years. By then, we'll probably be arguing that we can't live with 17 stops of dynamic range and the company that can't give us noise-free images at ISO 256,000 just doesn't innovate anymore...  :-X

142
You're on the right track. As you've discovered, printing is all about color management. I like to think of it in two main stages: Creating the image, and printing the image.

Creating the Image

1. Start by shooting RAW.
2. Then use a quality monitor, preferably with an IPS panel to reduce/eliminate color shifts with viewing angle.
3. Calibrate your monitor with a tool like the X-Rite i1 Display Pro, ColorMunki or the Spyder equivalent.
4. Use a good post-processing program like Adobe Lightroom, Capture One, etc, to produce the final image.

Printing the Image

Send your image to your favorite lab or printing service, or...

...print your own images with your own printer. There are a couple of recent threads on this topic here on Canon Rumors. Printing can be challenging and rewarding. For some, it's cost prohibitive, for others (like me), it's worth the cost and can be less expensive if you take advantage of deals when they pop-up.

If you're wanting to print, you'll need to research the printers that are out there and choose the one that suits your needs best. Once you have the printer, be sure to print with quality paper and use an ICC profile specifically for that printer/paper combination. Either let the printer driver handle all the color correction, or let the program you're printing from (e.g. Lightroom) handle it all, but not both at the same time.

A couple of things to keep in mind:

1. Your monitor projects the image with light directly to your eyes. The printed photo reflects light from it. Brightness will differ, whites will differ, depending on paper selection, ambient light, et cetera. You won't get an image that looks just like the screen. That said, with decent color management, you should get something that matches color, white balance and contrast pretty well.

2. Color management is not an exact process. Every display, printer, paper, ink will differ in the colors they can each produce. It's easy to get sucked into a black hole of trying to make everything perfect. It won't be. But with reasonable effort, you should be able to produce pleasing results.

What I use:

1. Canon 70D, shooting RAW.
2. Dell Ultrasharp IPS monitor
3. Process in Adobe Lightroom.
4. Lightroom handles all color correction for printing.
5. Printer is a Canon PIXMA Pro-100 (pretty much free when the right rebate is available).
6. Canon and Red River papers, using Canon and Red River ICC profiles for each paper.

I've been able to produce results that make me do the happy dance. It's got me wanting to start doing my own mats, then my own frames, then wanting a 24" wide format printer. It's a slippery slope, so be warned.  :P

To sum up, you must at least do color-managed creation. For printing, you can always send your work out to a lab or printing service.

Good luck!

143
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 03, 2015, 02:40:21 AM »
Golf Clubs & Fishing Reels come to mind for me...

Ditto golf clubs... but I only made one upgrade... after that... it wasn't the club, it was me.
My 6yrs old will start golfing this coming march. Hoping to get few buckets here and there :)

It's fun to start 'em young. My son was working the clay trap for me as soon as he was old enough to understand, "Pull!" Whatever the hobby, if it means time with my kiddos, it's worth every moment -- even if it's their hobby.

144
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 03, 2015, 02:36:43 AM »
Full frame is the way to go! My nines are tucked away and hardly ever get use, my Beretta 40 cal Cougar comes out a little but for the most part it's always the 45 that gets to play at the range these days... pretty much the same for my cameras.

I've actually spent more money on golf  over the last 20 years probably because nobody pays me to play :(



Great looking pair!

I'm glad my camera never runs out of rounds. I can shoot all day, occasionally swapping batteries and memory cards. I've had to take up reloading to feed the .45 and its appetite...  :P

145
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 03, 2015, 02:32:48 AM »
You can get a used 5D Original for very little.  I bought one last summer as a backup to my 5D MK III for $350.  That's a good way to get a realistic check on whether or not you want one, and a cheap starting point.  Don't pay too much, and you'll be able to sell it for no loss when you can afford a upgrade.
 
The original 5D has very good colors, its a remarkable camera for its age.
 
Your lenses all are much wider, so you'll be wanting longer lenses.

That's a good idea. Maybe I'll poke around the classifieds to see what there is to see. I usually like buying new stuff (except cars), but you make a good point about the low cost, low risk.

146
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 03, 2015, 02:30:38 AM »
Golf Clubs & Fishing Reels come to mind for me...

Ditto golf clubs... but I only made one upgrade... after that... it wasn't the club, it was me.

I hear ya, man. At least you can admit it.  :P

147
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 03, 2015, 02:29:18 AM »
I used to keep some handguns around. I did get into them in a "gear" way the same as I get into the ""gear-ness" of the cameras.  I sold them when I had a stepson move into the house as the risk of something bad resulting vs. the risk of something good happening seemed like a poor bet, for me anyway.

At least with cameras and "G.A.S." You end up with 1000's of good images to keep.  With the guns you never even need one much less 5 or 10 of them. Even 90%+ of police never shoot anyone in a whole career of carrying one around never actually shoot anyone.  I just spent a lot on ammo to punch holes in paper.

It's too bad you stuck to paper! My son and I have discovered the magical combination of .22LR and 5 1/2 dozen eggs from Walmart. :) Melons and pumpkins are great fun, too, with the bigger calibers. We like to shoot stuff that decomposes -- nothing to pack out but our shells and grins...

148
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 02, 2015, 10:02:14 PM »
LOL....I was just thinking the same thing. It would probably have to be ten times the price, though, to really be medium format. Maybe gold-plated?

149
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Gotta be patient...
« on: January 02, 2015, 09:06:14 PM »
Getting by with a crop sensor while I save up for full frame reminds me of a similar situation many years ago in my other "shooting" hobby...

My first pistol was a very capable 9mm, but after shooting a .45ACP for the first time, I was hooked. It took some time, but as soon as I had saved enough, I made the move. I still have the 9mm, and it has its uses, especially as a respectable backup, but the .45ACP gets the nod most of the time.

Anybody else have a similar experience? Maybe another hobby to relate it to?

PS: If 9mm is crop and .45ACP is full frame, what does that make .40S&W? APS-H?  ;D For some, just the right balance of performance and capacity...

PPS: Having G.A.S with either of these hobbies alone is miserable enough, but both at the same time is driving me mad...

150
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Deal: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $2296
« on: January 02, 2015, 08:53:42 PM »
By the way, the screen doesn't have to stay sticking out. It folds nicely against the body in either a closed (screen-inward) or open (screen-outward) orientation. When I need to take an overhead or low-to-the-ground shot, it's a lifesaver. Wouldn't want to have to give it up when I go full frame (although if all other features are there for $2k or less, I'd learn to live without it).

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