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Messages - Famateur

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46
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark III Replacement Talk [CR2]
« on: January 09, 2015, 02:07:19 PM »
With Nikon's pricing on the D810, I don't see how Canon could even attempt to charge 5K for a high megapixel camera in the 5D series.  I doubt I would even do more than look at it at that price.  Those prices would get me motivated to change brands or stay with what I have.

Yep -- it's the resolution and prices of the competition from Sony/Nikon that would put pressure on the Canon price. Hooray for competition!

I'm hoping you're right, although either way, it's beyond my hobbyist budget. :P I'm excited to see what comes along mainly for the price-impact when retailers need to move remaining stock of current gen bodies...

47
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark III Replacement Talk [CR2]
« on: January 09, 2015, 12:34:03 PM »
Just for fun, I found that you can still buy a new 1DsIII for $5,500 on Amazon. :P That's $1,500 more than my estimate for the 5Ds, and at less than half the resolution -- not to mention the weaker processing power and older AF and metering systems of a 7-year-old camera. :P

48
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark III Replacement Talk [CR2]
« on: January 09, 2015, 12:27:53 PM »
Anyhoo, this is what I'd sepculate:

1. 5Ds High-Megapixel for $4,999

Wow - that would certainly make my wallet's demand for moving over to Nikon increase by leaps and bounds!

Canon already outpriced itself once with the $3.500 5DIII what do you expext they will put into a 5Ds that will make people fork over $5.000? That's the price range of a 1D series Camera.

I got both my 5DII's very early after intro for $2.200 - just say'in.

My guess could very well be way high. I remember everyone moaning about the price of the 5DIII when it came out and that it wasn't enough of an upgrade over the 5DII for the premium. While there are a number of photographers who passed on the 5DIII for that reason, it still managed to become one of the most successful all around bodies to date. The price has also settled down to $3,099.

As for 1-series territory for pricing, there's only one 1-series body in the lineup right now, and it's still $6,799. That's $1,800 above my admittedly high estimate for a 5Ds. That said, the 1Ds II intro'd at $7,999 (don't know what the other "S" bodies into'd at -- feeling Google-lazy). It doesn't seem crazy to me that a new "S" variant would command a significant premium, even if put into a 5D body.

Speculation is always fun! :P

49
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark III Replacement Talk [CR2]
« on: January 09, 2015, 12:13:55 PM »
+1000 Dead On agree. That's exactly where my thinking is right now.  Except for the pricing.  I don't see Canon making a camera designed to effectively go head-to-head with a D810 (and/or the new Sony 46MP sensor allegedly due out soon) at $5000.  In order to be a viable competitor, I would think they would have to keep it sub $4k.  Which means the lower MP 5D3 or its replacement would come down to $2999 perhaps... UNLESS there is so much difference between the two models (very different but equally critical uses) they come out at the same price, just like Sony does with the Alpha 7R and 7S.  Thinkin' that may be a stretch for Canon given their history but not out the realm of possibility depending on exactly what they build AND if this CR2 even bears fruit.

You may be right on prices being lower than my guess (that was little more than a wet finger to the wind :P ). With the pleasantly reasonable introductory prices of the 70D, 7DII, 16-35 F4L IS and 100-400 F4.5-5.6 II, some downward movement in prices might be expected.

The completely unsupported thoughts that pointed me to $4,999 for the high-megapixel body are:

1. It was rumored that the high-megapixel "S" body could be in the 1 series and come in at $7,999. Putting it in a 5D series body means it would have to be < $5,000, and likely < $4,000, as you suspect.

2. The difference between 6D and 5DIII is about $1,300. If the new 5DIV comes in at similar intro price to the 5DIII ($3,499), then a similar price difference would put the 5Ds around $4,799. I threw on a couple hundred more to account for the "we-finally-have-a-high-megapixel-body!" factor. :P

To your point, it wouldn't surprise me if it was more like $3,499 for 5DIV and $3,999 for 5Ds. You choose between sensitivity and resolution, with resolution getting the premium. Competition from Sony/Nikon and their resolution/price will also add downward pressure to Canon prices.

It'll be interesting to see what happens!

50
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark III Replacement Talk [CR2]
« on: January 09, 2015, 11:51:39 AM »
If I was a Canon exec, I wouldn't have any heartburn about reaching the limitations of current name/numbering in the product lineup. New names and numbers aren't hard to come up with, and transitioning reputation from one name to another is pretty doable.

It wouldn't surprise me if Canon times the release of some ground-breaking tech it's been sitting on to correspond with new names that resolve the impending numbering ceiling on current product lines. That would be an ideal time to make the change to a new name, and when you do, all that suffixed number-based versioning fun can start fresh. :P

51
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark III Replacement Talk [CR2]
« on: January 09, 2015, 11:41:36 AM »
I'd be very surprised if they came out with two versions of the high MP sensor with and without an AA filter.

Agreed. I don't have the rumor/leak details the CR Admins have, but I wonder if there's some overlap between 'one camera with AA filter and one without' and 'a high-megapixel 5Ds and a lower megapixel 5DIV'. If I were to guess, it would be that the 5Ds lacks the AA filter, and the 5DIV retains it (i.e. just two bodies, not three). That wouldn't seem like throwing things against the wall to see what sticks. An "S" body has been missing from the lineup for quite a while, and a successor to the 5DIII is expected. Seems reasonable to me...

I might be wrong, but isn't the need for an AA filter reduced as the pixel density goes up? That might support Canon's decision to remove it for the 53MP body.

Now, to tread into areas I have even less knowledge...When it comes to resolving power of lenses, I don't see how 53MP would be an issue. We don't run into resolving power issues on the current crop sensors (or do we, and I just don't know?), so having similar pixel density on a full frame camera should be fine, right? It also wouldn't be a compromise on noise performance because full frame's advantage is a function of more surface area to gather light, not pixel density (because of gapless microlenses). Anyone with expertise on the subject, feel free to set me straight (Neuro, jrista, Lee Jay -- I'm looking to you guys :) ).

Anyhoo, this is what I'd sepculate:

1. 5Ds High-Megapixel for $4,999
2. 5DIV for $3,499
3. 6DII for $1,999

The high-megapixel body will be released long before the 5DIV. This would be to entice 5DIII users (particularly studio and landscape users) to make the jump from their aging 5DIII workhorses, and at early-adopter prices. Once that pent-up demand is satisfied, they release the 5DIV as a true upgrade/replacement of the 5DIII to feed the wedding/portrait/event market the 5DIII has served so well. The 6DII will have a few incremental advancements that keep it in the "entry level" category but are nice enough to justify the boost back up to $1,999. I wouldn't be surprised if the 6DII doesn't come for another year or more, though. The 5DIII second hand market might also push 6DII prices back down to $1,799 pretty fast, too.

It would be cool if Canon did something that blows everyone's minds at launch. For example, leap-frogging 4K and debuting a higher resolution standard with clean output and a powerful codec that keeps file sizes reasonable. Of course, the Cinema EOS line pretty much guarantees that won't happen in a DSLR. Or maybe Canon introduces a new sensor architecture that mops the floor with any current products for dynamic range and ISO performance.

Realistically, I think the acknowledged focus on serving the high-megapixel crowd and the high-sensitivity crowd separately is a pretty good indicator that a mind-blowing, do-all sensor is not coming any time soon.

Oh well -- I'm just excited for another generation of full frame bodies to be released so I can decide if I get the 6DII or pick up a current (then previous) generation body for much lower price. Either way, it's good for me. :P

52
Black & White / Re: How do I improve this picture?
« on: January 09, 2015, 12:58:21 AM »
+1 for moving the moon away from dead center. I like the image, though. The fuzzy moon works for me...

53
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters...

A variable ND filter is a pair of stacked polarizers (one circular, one linear), and the 'Maltese cross' has the same cause as the uneven polarization of skies with UWA lenses, except you don't need a sky to see it.
Thanks for the info...didn't know that. So the potential issues may be shared between CPL and VND, but not with a standard (non-variable) ND, yes?
Correct.  Standard NDs have no such issues.  The only potential issues are vignetting and flare (like any filter) and difficulty focusing (leave them off until you've focused).  Oh and forgetting to take them off - my favorite issue.  I was looking through my viewfinder for a cityscape shot the other night and it looked really dark.  Plus, my shutter speed was a flashing 30s!  A quick look at the BLACK filter on the front of my lens made me realize my mistake!  I do this with polarizers, too, not to mention trying to shoot wildlife at f/16 sometimes, and the list goes on...

LOL...I've done that a few times with sunglasses on, looking at the live view exposure and wondering why it was so dark.  :P

Speaking of polarizers, one day I thought the screen on my G12 was going out because it would turn off (go black) when I rotated it to view portrait shots (it has an accelerometer to auto-rotate the image). Every time I'd rotate, it would go dark. It took a minute to realize that it was the polarization of my sunglasses that was making it "go dark". LOL...

54
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters...

A variable ND filter is a pair of stacked polarizers (one circular, one linear), and the 'Maltese cross' has the same cause as the uneven polarization of skies with UWA lenses, except you don't need a sky to see it.
Thanks for the info...didn't know that. So the potential issues may be shared between CPL and VND, but not with a standard (non-variable) ND, yes?

55
Photography Technique / Re: How to Expose and get sharp Focus of Moon
« on: January 07, 2015, 04:24:37 PM »
Thanks for the confirmations of my supposition. It helps me, too.  :P

56
Photography Technique / Re: How to Expose and get sharp Focus of Moon
« on: January 07, 2015, 03:53:12 PM »

Good input!  I did NOT turn IS off, even though I know better.  :(   I'll try again tonight with what remains of the full moon.

Thanks!

I'm not an astro-shooter, either, but not having a full moon might actually help your quest for sharpness and detail. You won't get a perfectly round moon, but you'll get shadows on the craters near the waning edge that will increase the contrast of the details. Just a thought...

57
This is the perfect discussion for me.  I have the 10-22mm and I was going to buy a tiffen 77mm variable ND filter.  But if I can't use it at <24mm (I'm assuming FF values) then what's the point.  I was planning on using it for blurring clouds and waves... It seems like the best value for money?
I think the discussion about less than 24MM was for a circular polarizing filter, not a neutral density filter (unless you're talking about the comments regarding maltese cross artifacts that can occur on wide angle lenses with variable ND filters; from this thread, it sounds like some have been successful in using such a setup without artifacts). I think the confusion came because a CPL reduces exposure by a couple of stops, so you can use it in place of a 2-stop ND filter.

Quote
I bought a cpl and use it for his purpose, one filter less to carry around.
In case the OP doesn't know, CPL's start producing strange color gradation when used on ultrawides like the 10-22mm. Not sure what the "minimum safe lens length" is. 24mm?

58
Wow. Technology is amazing, but we often forget that engineers and scientists are the imaginative creators of the technology, and they are what truly amaze me.

Can't wait to see what we have in another 15-20 years. By then, we'll probably be arguing that we can't live with 17 stops of dynamic range and the company that can't give us noise-free images at ISO 256,000 just doesn't innovate anymore...  :-X

59
You're on the right track. As you've discovered, printing is all about color management. I like to think of it in two main stages: Creating the image, and printing the image.

Creating the Image

1. Start by shooting RAW.
2. Then use a quality monitor, preferably with an IPS panel to reduce/eliminate color shifts with viewing angle.
3. Calibrate your monitor with a tool like the X-Rite i1 Display Pro, ColorMunki or the Spyder equivalent.
4. Use a good post-processing program like Adobe Lightroom, Capture One, etc, to produce the final image.

Printing the Image

Send your image to your favorite lab or printing service, or...

...print your own images with your own printer. There are a couple of recent threads on this topic here on Canon Rumors. Printing can be challenging and rewarding. For some, it's cost prohibitive, for others (like me), it's worth the cost and can be less expensive if you take advantage of deals when they pop-up.

If you're wanting to print, you'll need to research the printers that are out there and choose the one that suits your needs best. Once you have the printer, be sure to print with quality paper and use an ICC profile specifically for that printer/paper combination. Either let the printer driver handle all the color correction, or let the program you're printing from (e.g. Lightroom) handle it all, but not both at the same time.

A couple of things to keep in mind:

1. Your monitor projects the image with light directly to your eyes. The printed photo reflects light from it. Brightness will differ, whites will differ, depending on paper selection, ambient light, et cetera. You won't get an image that looks just like the screen. That said, with decent color management, you should get something that matches color, white balance and contrast pretty well.

2. Color management is not an exact process. Every display, printer, paper, ink will differ in the colors they can each produce. It's easy to get sucked into a black hole of trying to make everything perfect. It won't be. But with reasonable effort, you should be able to produce pleasing results.

What I use:

1. Canon 70D, shooting RAW.
2. Dell Ultrasharp IPS monitor
3. Process in Adobe Lightroom.
4. Lightroom handles all color correction for printing.
5. Printer is a Canon PIXMA Pro-100 (pretty much free when the right rebate is available).
6. Canon and Red River papers, using Canon and Red River ICC profiles for each paper.

I've been able to produce results that make me do the happy dance. It's got me wanting to start doing my own mats, then my own frames, then wanting a 24" wide format printer. It's a slippery slope, so be warned.  :P

To sum up, you must at least do color-managed creation. For printing, you can always send your work out to a lab or printing service.

Good luck!

60
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Gotta be patient...
« on: January 03, 2015, 02:40:21 AM »
Golf Clubs & Fishing Reels come to mind for me...

Ditto golf clubs... but I only made one upgrade... after that... it wasn't the club, it was me.
My 6yrs old will start golfing this coming march. Hoping to get few buckets here and there :)

It's fun to start 'em young. My son was working the clay trap for me as soon as he was old enough to understand, "Pull!" Whatever the hobby, if it means time with my kiddos, it's worth every moment -- even if it's their hobby.

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