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Messages - V8Beast

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46
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 27, 2013, 11:10:57 PM »
I would love to get my mitts on a NASCAR race!!!, we have drag racing here in Abu Dhabi too, I will be attending this year as a spectator (no JCB for that event), but one of the most fun events I have had over here was the Aussie V8 Supercars last year, they were one of the support races at the F1, what a scream those guys are!!!  Their main recovery man was a typical Aussie, the comment of the weekend from him was (rather rude, so my apologies in advance) as he described the difference between being able to salvage a car that could potentially continue (so to be gentle) compared to pulling a wrecked car out the Armco wall, he said “F**K it, it’s F**ked”, made me laugh  ;D

Be careful what you wish for. Most people attending a NASCAR race are just looking for an excuse to get drunk in public on a Sunday morning. Drag racing fans are similar, but instead of waiting until 10 am to get drunk they're already drunk by 8 am  ;D

I'd love to soak of the car scene in the Middle East sometime. The sight of so many Ferraris, Lamboghinis, and Bugattis street racing is just nuts.

I also love me some V8 Supercars, and will make sure to attend the race in Austin next year. Ironically, the closest thing you can get to American Trans Am racing from the '60s is the Australian V8 Supercars series. Speaking of Australia, the Bathurst circuit is one of a true hidden gems of the racing world. What an epic track!

47
EOS Bodies / Re: New EOS-1 in 2014 [CR1]
« on: November 20, 2013, 11:08:17 PM »
I use 5d3 and will use it but how am I wrong in wishing it's sensor gets better?

Your portfolio is stunning. It appears your Canon gear is serving you very well :)

48
EOS Bodies / Re: New EOS-1 in 2014 [CR1]
« on: November 20, 2013, 11:13:49 AM »

Ok, then...but what are Nikon and Sony's "Answers" to the 5DIII, which has outsold the D800 and will vastly outsell the a7R?   ::)

The Df? If you can't beat them, go retro ;D

49
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 20, 2013, 11:10:11 AM »
I do, however; appreciate what Celltech said with regards to how much people actually know about the techy stuff (perhaps the figures quoted may not be perfectly accurate ), as I have sat in the stands for years and people have no clue what’s usually going on, I base this on the fact that I have always been surrounded by people asking basic questions and who cannot identify any of the drivers or even the teams, you’d be surprised how many “Tifosi” jump up waving their gigantic Ferrari flags when a Marussia goes whizzing by, it makes me chuckle every time.  :P

That's both funny and sad at the same time! Granted my experience attending races is very limited, but I was very surprised how knowledgeable the fans were at this year's USGP. Probably not so much regarding the technical aspect of the sport, but factoids like which driver won which race, how the constructor's points are tallied, who carries the broadcasting rights for F1 races in the U.K., which driver said what in interviews leading up to the race, etc. Perhaps the less knowledgeable fans just kept their mouths shut ;D?

It's also possible that my standards are quite low. If you want to experience low-functioning fans, all you have to do is talk to a NASCAR or a drag racing fan.

50
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 19, 2013, 11:27:11 PM »
Guess I can throw in my own $0.02 worth...  I am an engineer by trade and I still don't get why soooo many people around the world LOVE F1.  I appreciate and love the tech, but I have to think that 99% of the world does not.


I'll throw out some theories, most of which are probably wrong :) Traction control, stability control, launch control, active suspension dampers, carbon brakes, anti-block brakes, sequential transmissions, electronic differentials, and drive-by-wire throttle (just to name a few) were all pioneered in Formula One 10 or more years before they ever saw the light of day in a passenger car. When you see an F1 car zoom by, you're literally looking at the future. Surely any engineer can appreciate that :)

For the 99% percent of the world you mention (probably more like 90% of the world, since F1's 600 million viewership represents almost 10% of the world population), I think a lot of it has to do with mystique. Here in America, cars are commodities more than they are luxuries. Plus, the average Joe can watch or participate in all kinds of motorsports ranging from drag racing to road racing to autocross to short-track racing to rallying to drifting to karting. If you live in a country where most people take public transportation, and very few people have the luxury of watching or participating in motor racing, watching F1 on TV is as good as it gets. 

Quote
Once Vettel took pole position it might as well have been over.  He easily led the race and even set fast lap right at the end, as if to say he could have won it by more.

Very true. Any time one team or one driver dominates like Red Bull and Vettel have this season, the racing can become very boring. That said, many seasons are dog fights right down to the very last race, and these are the memories F1 fans live for, whether it's Schumacher barely edging out Hakkinen for the championship in 2000 at Indy, or a 24-year-old Fernando Alonso beating the 7-time World Champion in Schumacher at the second to last race of the season in 2006. Going into the last race of 2007, no one expected Raikkonen to win the championship, but he did. The same goes for Vettel in 2010.   

Quote
Sitting at one spot waiting for the long train of cars just got old.  They all did the same thing and drove by.  I think I got a better sense of the driving by watching how they setup for the different corners.

In the end the weekend itself was fun.  Austin is a GREAT town to hang out in and check out the scene.  The track is immense and offers a lot of visual activities.  But the actual race?  Maybe I just don't get it...

For an F1 nut, there's plenty to enjoy even in a not-so-interesting race in which Vettel dominated. As an amateur racer, I marveled at how late the cars hit the brakes approaching Turn 1. They're going nearly 200 mph at the end of the straight, and they don't hit the brakes until after the 100 meter marker. Incredible. I then marvel at the physical fitness required to endure 5 g's under braking for 1.5 hours without passing out. I race a 125cc shifter kart, which pulls 2.5 - 3 g's, and my neck muscles and ribs are sore after 30 minutes!

Despite the fact that Turn 1 has a blind entry, the drivers hit the apex of the corner perfectly- down to an inch or two - lap after lap. As an amateur who'd be lucky to hit the apex 1 out of 20 laps, I was awestruck to see that caliber of driving skill and precision.

I also witnessesed firsthand one of the reasons why the Red Bulls are so much faster than the rest of the field. I was very surprised how much earlier the Red Bulls were able to hit the gas and put the power down coming out of Turn 1 compared to every other car in the field. In fact, Webber seemed to get back on throttle even earlier than Vettel. Multiply that advantage over a dozen-plus corners, and it really adds up at the end of a lap and at the end of a race.

I'm hoping that the major rules changes in 2014 will help end the Red Bull domination, and make for some more interesting racing. The last big rules change was in 2009, and all that happened that season was an unknown, under-funded team (Brawn GP), with an underachieving driver (Jenson Button) went on to topple the Ferrari and McLaren empires. Great stuff :) 

Plus, there's the fact that you're watching the world's greatest drivers racing on the world's greatest tracks in the world's fastest, most technologically advanced cars.

That's why I love F1 ;D

51
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 19, 2013, 07:25:41 PM »
I've been go Austin several times through my job, but that was before they built the track. I've heard good things about it, but the new tracks will have a difficult time trying to measure up to the classics.


COTA looks much more interesting in person than it does on TV, that's for sure. The elevation change is much more noticeable when you're there:

Turn 1









Turn 2



Turns 10 and 11



Turns 7 and 8


52
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 19, 2013, 06:48:16 PM »
Meh, you should have heard them when they did around 20,000rpm.

You had to rub it in, didn't you :(

The naturally aspirated V-12s and V-10s certainly had a invigorating, tenor shrill to them.

53
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 19, 2013, 03:09:38 PM »
I'm sorry, I don't have any pictures from Spa, but I agree with you it's the finest track of them all. It's the mother of all race tracks. Only really good drivers win here, remember Hakkinen's overtake on Schumi. He flew over the left cerb at Eau Rouge to set up the greatest overtake in F1 history.

How can any F1 fan forget that pass? I still get goosebumps watching it on YouTube. Not only is Spa the greatest track on earth, Eau Rouge is the greatest complex of corners on earth. I must go there someday :)!

The esses on the 130R at Suzuka are pretty cool, but Eau Rouge tops them all.

54
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 19, 2013, 12:26:38 PM »
Some great advice in this thread, as well as some great shots taken by people modestly labeling themselves as amateurs :)

I took my 5D3, 24-105, and 70-300L to this year's USGP, but honestly I didn't take many images at all. Since this was the first F1 race I attending, I wanted to enjoy the event instead watching bits and pieces of the race through a viewfinder.

A few observations from COTA:

- I scoped out all the general admissions area, and you're either too far away from the track and/or shooting through the fence to get a good shot.
- At the sections of the track (Turns 7, 8, 11) that offers good vantage point that aren't obstructed by the fence, a 300mm lens isn't nearly long enough.
- If the fence if brightly lit, and you're several hundreds of feet away from it, the AF will focus on the fence no matter what. That was the situation from the general admissions area, half way up the hill in Turn 1, which is where I watched the race from. A good work around was opening up the aperture, manually focusing near the apex of the turn, and shooting the cars as they passed through that point. An even better work around is to just put the camera down and enjoy the race :) I saw lots of spectators so fixated on shooting that they had no idea what was going on during the race.
- As others suggested, do most of the shooting during practice and qualifying. Slaving away through a viewfinder is no way to enjoy the spectacle of F1 racing.

As an American, a Texan, and an Austinite, it's great to hear all the positive comments from the drivers regarding COTA, but I still think Spa is the best track on earth. Does anyone have pics from Spa they want to share :)? If I can only attend one other F1 race, I want to go to Spa!

55
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: November 19, 2013, 11:58:23 AM »
One thing that is both a plus and a minus (you may know this already):  2014 sees all new smaller V6 engines and chassis, with state of the art turbo charging that is all combined with electric motor assist/batteries (I don't like this part)...but it's possible the cars might be a bit quieter than the current V8's.  Obviously they won't be as quiet as normal "turbo" cars can be.


I just got back from the USGP, and I feel very fortunate that I got to hear the 2.4L naturally aspirated V-8s screaming away at 18,000 rpm one last time. While I appreciate the technology involved with next's year's turbo V-6s, the sound is much more subdued. Mercedes recently posted a sound clip of the 2014 V-6 running a simulated lap at Monza on the dyno:

2014: A lap with the new Mercedes-Benz V6! Small | Large


Still a nice sound, but not nearly as visceral at the naturally aspirated V-8s.

56
Lenses / Re: I'm done part II - here are all of the lenses I've sold
« on: November 08, 2013, 09:08:11 PM »
My sold list is quite short:

Canon 10-22: Great lens, but replaced it with a 17-40L after going full-frame
Canon 28-135: Complete POS lens. Replaced it with a 24-105L
Canon 35mm: Some kinda cheap prime that never got much use
Canon 70-200 f/4: By far my favorite "sold" lens. Tack sharp with outstanding color and contrast. Replaced it with a 70-300L after going full frame for some extra reach.

57
Canon's timing is impeccable. I need a new monitor for internet porn.
Buying a $40000 monitor to watch internet p0rn has to be the height of desperation ... I hope you are aware that you can have plenty of the real thing for $40000 ;D

Yeah, but once I use up that $40K, I'd have no monitor to showoff to my basement-dwelling tech geek friends ;D That kind of logic might explain why basement-dwelling tech geeks have to resort to internet porn in the first place ;D

58
Canon's timing is impeccable. I need a new monitor for internet porn.

59
Can poor people (like me :)) who use Alien Bees/White Lightnings also benefit from the MC2, or will they only work with Einsteins?


Only Einsteins.  For AB/WL, you'd need a FlexTT5 tranceiver and an AC9.


It would be badass if you could have the benefits of the MC2 built-in to the FlexTT5, but then Speedlite users would complain that they're paying for something they don't need. Kinda like the "I don't need video on an SLR" whiners ;D. At least Pocket Wizard gives you the option of adding on studio light power control to its existing receivers with the MC2. Pretty cool!

60
My jaw is still on the floor. What an incredible product. Too bad I can't afford a set of these puppies :(

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