December 21, 2014, 02:51:07 PM

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Messages - Sporgon

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1
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: December 19, 2014, 04:36:46 PM »
This is Southwell Minster in Nottinghamshire, England, a building that has some incredibly old architecture, especially in the nave section of the church where it dates from about 1140. A bit of historical trivia: this was where King Charles I was captured at the end of the English Civil War.

Really Sporgon, your Pano Images are superb, this one in particular, had a look at your web site as well, wonderful Images.

Many thanks eml. I do feel that the panos gain not only from being a wider-than-normal vista, but also effectively being from a larger format. Basically the picture is being made with more light.

2
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: December 19, 2014, 04:31:53 PM »
Beautiful light. Well done Sporgon.

I put these under 'landscape' gallery because I think of these as landscapes as much as anything.

This is Southwell Minster in Nottinghamshire, England, a building that has some incredibly old architecture, especially in the nave section of the church where it dates from about 1140. A bit of historical trivia: this was where King Charles I was captured at the end of the English Civil War.

Shot on 6D, 24-70 f4 IS @ 35mm, a six frame pano. f8, ISO 400.

Stunning

Many thanks Click and niteclicks, appreciated.

3
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: December 17, 2014, 01:52:17 PM »
I put these under 'landscape' gallery because I think of these as landscapes as much as anything.

This is Southwell Minster in Nottinghamshire, England, a building that has some incredibly old architecture, especially in the nave section of the church where it dates from about 1140. A bit of historical trivia: this was where King Charles I was captured at the end of the English Civil War.

Shot on 6D, 24-70 f4 IS @ 35mm, a six frame pano. f8, ISO 400.

4
Lenses / Re: Canon 35mm F2 IS image quality
« on: December 17, 2014, 12:41:00 PM »
standing back and zooming in

You've described what you like here; perspective is a result of distance from the subject, nothing else.

If you have a photo editing suite of some sort you can test this for yourself with a good standard zoom. Shoot a scene with plenty of depth detail at 24mm. Then shoot from exactly the same place at 70mm ( or 105 ). Look at the two pictures side by side, particularly the central area of the 24mm picture covered by the 70mm. The 70mm shot will appear to have more 'compression'.

Now crop out of the 24mm shot the same framing as the 70mm. Reduce the image size of the 70mm shot so both the cropped picture and the 70mm are the same size. Look at them both side by side again: this time they will be identical. If you can, overlay one on the other and reduce opacity to 50% so you can see them both. With a good quality zoom they will virtually overlay each other identically.

5
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: December 16, 2014, 05:24:53 PM »
Beautiful shot Sporgon. Nicely done.

Thanks Click and Domino !

(and I don't even like history)

Bet I could get you interested if you came on a shoot with me !  ;)

6
Lenses / Re: Canon 35mm F2 IS image quality
« on: December 16, 2014, 03:33:35 PM »
Interesting observation. Shallow dof 'pop' can be induced by the contrast between very sharp in focus areas and the remaining blurr, or 'bokeh'. So some lenses have really good bokeh; the EF 50/1.4 for instance, but it doesn't display very well against the sharpness and contrast of that 50 mil lens at f1.4. So my initial reaction is that you are not getting proper focus when wide open, either due to the need for AFMA, or a bad copy of the lens.

However what prompted me to reply is the fact that the 24-70/2.8 uses ground glass aspherical elements ( very expensive to produce) and the 35/2 IS uses moulded ( cheapish).  Now I have often thought that these moulded elements are getting better and better; the 35/s IS is definitely very good, but some of the lenses that I have, or have had, with the much more expensive to produce elements in them do seem to give, for want of a better description, a 'liquid, 'glassy' quality. I'm not saying that I could pull the difference out in a blind test all the time but I see it in some of my pictures taken with those lenses.

7
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: December 16, 2014, 03:15:55 PM »
Had a recent trip to Helmsley Castle in Yorkshire, England. The castle is quite unusual in that it incorporated not just one moat, but two. A sort of double ditch affair. The castle was used as a Royalist stronghold in the English Civil War around 1644, and after the war it was destroyed by the new parliament. The building in the picture close to the second ditch is actually Tudor in date ( 1500s), and not medieval, unlike the tower which is about 1200.

A six frame pano shot on 6D + 24-70 f4 IS at about 35mm in the very last of the sun before it disappeared below the wooded horizon.

8
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 5D mkIV
« on: December 14, 2014, 05:21:16 PM »
the 1DC did surprisingly well, well much better than us stills shooters with $6,000 cameras would think, and has a very good reputation for its size capabilities and price.

Let's hope it doesn't give Canon ideas about raising the next 1Dx price !  ;D

9
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 5D mkIV
« on: December 14, 2014, 05:02:08 PM »
I'm guessing that the 5DIV will introduce an interchangeable viewfinder, similar to the ones used on the F-1 and F3 etc, except that one will be a normal high quality pentaprism, and the other an EVF.

With the pentaprism finder you could return to using interchaneable focusing screens on the 5 series by dropping the screen into the body when the prism is removed.

With the EVF, when fitted the mirror automatically locks up out of the way. A finder sliding in from the rear allows proper plug interface rather than contacts. DPAF on the sensor allows accurate focusing with the EVF in place. Primarily intended for video, but use it for stills if, as a child, you were done some serious injustice by a mirror, resulting in repeated accusations of 'flappy mirror' postings on CR.

I doubt if such a cool feature would ever be in anything but a 1 series, just like every other Canon camera with interchangable viewfinders has only been in the top of the line cameras.

That's true, but I come across 5 series being used for video more than 1 series, but you are most probably right about keeping this feature, should it materialise, in the 1 series.

10
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 5D mkIV
« on: December 14, 2014, 04:22:41 PM »
I'm guessing that the 5DIV will introduce an interchangeable viewfinder, similar to the ones used on the F-1 and F3 etc, except that one will be a normal high quality pentaprism, and the other an EVF.

With the pentaprism finder you could return to using interchaneable focusing screens on the 5 series by dropping the screen into the body when the prism is removed.

With the EVF, when fitted the mirror automatically locks up out of the way. A finder sliding in from the rear allows proper plug interface rather than contacts. DPAF on the sensor allows accurate focusing with the EVF in place. Primarily intended for video, but use it for stills if, as a child, you were done some serious injustice by a mirror, resulting in repeated accusations of 'flappy mirror' postings on CR.

11
Canon EF Zoom Lenses / Re: Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
« on: December 14, 2014, 01:48:27 PM »
nice work sporgon!    Given the choice, I would have used my 16-35mm f/4, for the sunset but in this case I was driving and had just a few seconds window of opportunity to stop, grab the camera and run. This shot was taken at about 35mm.  The 24-105 was attached to the 5D3 and I didn't have time to change lenses,  much less set up the tripod  So I settled for a 5-frame HDR.  One of the problems inherent to the 24-105 is flare, and for that reason this is the only sunset I have attempted with it.  Thank goodness for IS and great ghosting and alignment software!  This one used only Lightroom and the Nik plugin.

That's quite a dramatic image ! Would go down well on a site like 500px. I like what you have done with it. I have always found my copies of the 24-105L to be pretty good at 35mm, but that 16-35 f4 L seems quite remarkable. Trouble is when I shoot wide I am normally stitching longer lenses, so I can't quite justify it............

12
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: FYI: D750 light leak issues
« on: December 14, 2014, 01:39:34 PM »
I suppose this happens to all manufacturers nowadays.
(to summarize, there is a light leak when shooting into backlit scenes using live view)

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1331716/0

Looks like they were determined to copy the 5DIII as closely as possible.

13
Canon EF Zoom Lenses / Re: Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
« on: December 14, 2014, 01:24:38 PM »
I very rarely use the 24-105 for single frame shots; it's a great lens for panoramics, but here is a shot of Southwell Minster taken on the 24-105L @ 28mm - I avoid 24 mm on this lens, the 24-70 f4 IS is much better at 24mm.

5DII, 100 ISO f8. Shutter about 1/40.

It's not done bad here, but it's losing it in the extreme corners big time.

14
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Review: Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 Apo Planar T*
« on: December 13, 2014, 06:08:20 AM »
Excellent review Dustin. The only downside (for my bank account) is I now know which 85mm to add to my lens collection ;)

Manual focus doesn't bother me as I spent the first 30 years of photography with manual lenses (FD series). And the focus confirmation in the current series of cameras makes it much easier.

Your point about focus confirmation is true.  Live View also helps when you have a chance to be a little more deliberate.  I've not used any of the better screens for manual focusing, but other have reported that those help, too.  My experience is that my keeper rate with manual focus lenses is actually very high; I just take more time at acquisition.

Do you mean you are using the standard 'Brite Screen' in the 6D with the 85 Otus ? If so I'm  surprised you're able to get focus at f1.4 with this lens because of that screen showing a dof of about f3.2, unless you are referring to live view, but it doesn't sound as if you are.

Is the sensitivity of the focus confirmation system related to the type of screen used (which I thought only affected the subjective perception of depth of focus)?
If not, Dustin Abbott can use focus confirmation reliably at f/1.4 even when his eyes cannot be trusted.
Curious...

I presume the confirmation dot works from the AF phase detect module and so is not screen dependant. Just means with the standard screen you have to watch for the dot which I find distracting from what else in going on in the 'finder. That also puts an emphasis on AFMA does it not ? What happens if your camera body AF module is slightly out ? Of course you can't AFMA a manual lens !

Actually just thinking about it, maybe you can adjust the camera to correct the in focus confirmation dot.

15
I do several things, and none of them are listed in your poll.

1. I use a hand-held incident meter.



Yep, so do I, at least quite frequently. Assuming that you are not compensating for something like strong highlight or strong shadow you can't beat nailing the exposure onto the sensor in the correct place if you want maximum IQ. The whole ETTR thing is mostly a myth brought about by people shooting zero data ( lens caps on for instance ) and then analysing it at 200% which has zero relevance to a normal picture.

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