August 01, 2014, 09:08:44 AM

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Messages - Sporgon

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106
Is it around now that the Great Crested Grebe will make an appearance ?

107
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: June 06, 2014, 09:23:32 AM »
First L for me was my 100-400L.  Fell in love with it and signed up almost immediately for my next; 70-200 f/2.8L IS II.  Still have those first two, the others seem to keep coming and keep going from my modest corral..  ;D

@Ken, have you been on the wacky backy again ? This is the 'Best Landscape' thread !

Here's one of mine of Hardraw Beck in the Yorkshire Dales. All you CR guys who can't / won't shoot at anything other than wide open have got me thinking about shallow dof landscapes !

108
Lenses / Re: What was your first L lens?
« on: June 06, 2014, 03:10:28 AM »
Mine's the same as nitelife2: the 20-35 f2.8 L, bought used in about 1991.

109
Landscape / Re: Waterscapes
« on: June 05, 2014, 06:27:14 PM »
Aysgarth Middle Falls in the Yorkshire Dales, England, on the River Ure. Through the trees you can just see Aysgarth church which is reputed to have the largest grave yard in terms of acres  in England.
Very nice Sporgon. I´m off to Scotland tomorrow, hoping for some good light!

Many thanks, Eldar. Best of luck with the weather in Scotland. Saturday and Sunday looking more settled up there, possible rain on Monday and then Tuesday quite wet.

Bring back some good pictures !

110
Landscape / Re: Waterscapes
« on: June 05, 2014, 05:25:13 PM »
Aysgarth Middle Falls in the Yorkshire Dales, England, on the River Ure. Through the trees you can just see Aysgarth church which is reputed to have the largest grave yard in terms of acres  in England.

111
Photography Technique / Re: What Lenses Do You Use for Panoramics?
« on: June 04, 2014, 03:03:34 PM »
Wow, lots of activity on this post today, thank you guys for the information and the great photos.  I'm learning a lot from everyone who's replied to this post and appreciate all of your responses.  Panos are a source of frustration for me in terms of composition.  I see the photo in my mind but when it's stitched together, it never seems to match my vision.  The information and samples you're posting will be really helpful next time I attempt a pano.  Thanks 8)

Glad it's all helping!

One problem that I see with a lot of pano shots, especially with gigapan based ones, is that it's often a case, of  'never mind the quality, see the width' - i.e. picture are taken because they can be taken, rather than with the intent of creating a great image.

Visualising composition for a huge image is a skill, just like effective use of wide angle lenses. Choice of cropping on a stitched set of images can make all the difference (I've not the patience to try wide film ;-)

One problem people have is that you often only see the real feel of an image as a big print - what works great as a 96" width print may look a bit weak on screen.

I've a 72" canvas of this one outside of my office (my wife's choice, since we spent part of our honeymoon there :-) The perspective is spot on if you stand just across the landing, to look at it from about 5 feet away.

(hand held multiple shots with 24-70 on 1Ds3 - taken quickly to avoid wave stitching errors)

I don't believe you can pan round faster that the wave action !

I certainly couldn't move faster than the water in these shots, especially as they are five-across, two-up panos, creating a sensor size of 60 x 90 (ish) and a megapixel count in the region of 100.

First shot is Hardraw Force where the 1991 film Robin Hood, Price of Thieves' was shot, and I have included an enlargement of the little boy by the plunge pool. This was shot at 45 mil.

The second is Aysgarth falls, again used in the film where Robin fights Little John with Long Staffs for passage over the river. This ten frame pano was shot at 40 mil.

These were shot hand held. I do prefer shooting panos this way for the greater freedom.

112
Landscape / Re: Waterscapes
« on: June 03, 2014, 03:27:49 PM »
Aysgarth Falls on the River Ure in the Yorkshire Dales,England. This is the 'Upper Falls' and was used in the 1991 film 'Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves', where Kevin Costner ( Robin Hood) fights Nick Brimble ( Little John ) for passage over the river.

In fact in the film Robin really got about on his way home to Nottingham in England. He lands at the White Cliffs of Dover on the South coast, meets some of the Sheriff's men on Hadrian's Wall - on the border with Scotland, then fights Little John over the River Ure in the Yorkshire Dales, before meeting up with maid Marian.'Everything I do I do it for you' Brian Adams song that went with the film.

A ten frame pano, five across, two up, making a 60 x 90 mm format at about 100 mp.

6D + 24-70 f4 IS @ 65 mm. 1/400, f11, ISO here and there.

113
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: June 02, 2014, 06:14:06 PM »
Another shot of Hardraw Force, used in the 1991 film 'Robin Hood, Price of Thieves'. In this shot, for those that know the film,  you can see where 'Marian' and her 'maid' were filmed up on the far right hand side of the picture, looking down on 'Robin' who was on the right of the waterfall.

A ten frame pano, format size about 60 x 90 mm and around 100 megapixel. 

114
Landscape / Re: Waterscapes
« on: June 02, 2014, 08:39:36 AM »
A five frame panoramic shot of Richmond Falls on the River Warfe, just below the walls of Richmond Castle.

5DII + 24-70 f4 IS

115
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: 6D or 5DM3 need your help guys
« on: June 02, 2014, 08:24:47 AM »
The 24-105 comes into it's own when used relatively close. Anyone who has shot a wedding will know that that is when this lens really shines; in fact I'm sure it was designed around the requirements of wedding photography. It copes really well with black suits and white dresses.

Resolving small detail far away is not its forte though, so it is not the worlds best landscape lens, unless you stitch and then it's as good as anything.

The 24-70 f4 IS is better in this respect but it's not as good at 105 of course  ;)

116
Landscape / Re: Post Your Best Landscapes
« on: June 02, 2014, 04:35:24 AM »
This is Hardraw Force in the  Yorkshire Dales, the highest single drop waterfall ( above ground) in England. It became world famous when it was used in the 1991 film 'Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves' with Kevin Costner.

Costner is caught by Marian ( Mary Mastrantorio) 'showering' under the waterfall. Mary and her maid were up on ( in reality a very indistinct muddy path) the far left of the picture while Kevin was down in the bottom to the right of the waterfall. In fact if he had been showering under it it would probably be the last thing he would have done !

Shot as a ten frame panoramic, the the actual format is about 60 x 90, so genuinely as large as the largest film medium format camera, and it is about 100 mp.

Shot on the 6D with 24-70 f4 IS @ 40 mil.

When you work with files of 100 mp @ 60 x 90 mm you realise why there's little point in getting excited about a 36 mp FF format. 20-24 mp is more than ample on that format.

117
Technical Support / Re: large object inside viewfinder 5D3
« on: June 01, 2014, 05:01:49 PM »
If it appears to be indistinct and blurred it's probably on the outside of the focus screen, and can be blown away. If it looks sharp then it is probably on the inside surface of the focus screen or even on the outer surface of the prism.

As the 5DIII doesn't have a user interchangeable screen it is more difficult to remove. Quarter inch sounds rather large, I've never known anything that big get in there.

118
The Sony sensor is very good, but if you exposure the Canon optimally the difference is generally academic in the vast majority of circumstances. However if you have no understanding of exposure the exmor is better.
However, filter manufacturers sell loads of 1-3 stop GND filters so a couple more stops of dynamic range is useful to a lot people as well, even people who understand exposure, or should I say, especially to people who understand exposure.

Which is fine for photographs with a split horizon, What of trees extending in the darker area of the graduated portion of the frame? I used to be a big GND filter user, but I prefer using a combination of shots to balance exposures across a frame. I don't like GND's because I can usually see the GND graduation in the frame which points to a poor methodology to control the contrast in the first place.

Those people will know that by using a 1-3 stop GND you are able to get more light to the non ND part of the frame, which, depending upon what you are shooting, results in improved data from dark areas whether you are using a 12 or 14 DR capable camera. So you probably have as many Sonikon photographers buying them as Canon.

I agree with you; I don't use GND filters at all since digital has come of age - ie for about the last ten years.

100 seemed to me to be suggesting that the continued production of GND filters is to support those poor souls who still use Canon for landscape photography.

Most of my panoramics are shot in the way you describe, but often I don't need to do this. There is more latitude in these modern Canon sensors than some people give them credit for. Here's a shot out of a window at Bolton Castle in the English Yorkshire Dales, where Mary Queen of Scots was imprisoned by Elizabeth I. It's actually taken from a 'garderobe' ( toilet) L shaped passage, and the only light coming in is from this window. It was taken at mid day with the sun out.

I've shown the original jpeg from RAW with the jpeg picture style applied. Then I've shown the finished picture, and finally for those that like absurdity I've lightened the shadows and brought the sky down to silly levels. Anything blown ? No. FPN ? Only in the few areas where the sensor has recorded zero light, and even then it's not bad.

And this was taken on the 'old' 5DII which is nothing like as good as the 6D in it's latitude and data manipulation.

119
The Sony sensor is very good, but if you exposure the Canon optimally the difference is generally academic in the vast majority of circumstances. However if you have no understanding of exposure the exmor is better.
However, filter manufacturers sell loads of 1-3 stop GND filters so a couple more stops of dynamic range is useful to a lot people as well, even people who understand exposure, or should I say, especially to people who understand exposure.

Those people will know that by using a 1-3 stop GND you are able to get more light to the non ND part of the frame, which, depending upon what you are shooting, results in improved data from dark areas whether you are using a 12 or 14 DR capable camera. So you probably have as many Sonikon photographers buying them as Canon. 

120
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: 6D or 5DM3 need your help guys
« on: June 01, 2014, 03:47:06 AM »
Sounds like the 6D was made for you. Get one or two good lenses with the cash you'll have left.

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