February 27, 2017, 08:34:28 PM

Recent Posts

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21
It is very impressive how many lenses Sigma managed to release in 5 years. They are imho just missing Art macro and 70-200 Sport and they will have complete replacement of old lenses with new ones.

Given the new Sigma sdQ and sdQ H cameras, which require Global Vision lenses for the best AF performance, more lens updates to Global Vision standards are just about guaranteed.

Updates to older lenses are all but certainties, yes, but the Quattro rigs have little to do with that. 

Anyone have Sigma's pie chart of what mounts their lenses are bolted on to?  In absence of any data, I'm going to hazard a guess that less than 20% of their lenses are for the SA mount.  Canon/Nikon/Sony must make up the lion's share of their sales.

So, yes, updates to work best with the SA mount's AF will happen, but that's not what is driving Sigma.  Getting their glass on everyone else's mirrorless and SLR setups is.

- A
22
It is very impressive how many lenses Sigma managed to release in 5 years. They are imho just missing Art macro and 70-200 Sport and they will have complete replacement of old lenses with new ones.

Given the new Sigma sdQ and sdQ H cameras, which require Global Vision lenses for the best AF performance, more lens updates to Global Vision standards are just about guaranteed.
23
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS Rebel SL2 Confirmed in 2017 [CR3]
« Last post by ahsanford on Today at 06:23:14 PM »
... Why the hell are they making another SL1? ...Surely the tandem of M5/M6 could address the need for folks to keep things small without throwing away functionality...
The 7DI was an all-around, general purpose camera for those wanting the best possible APS-C available. The 7DII is a beast that is targeted to a specific niche market -- action photographers who either want APS-C to supplement their full frame, want the extra reach APS-C offers or simply can't justify or afford 1DX price tag. While the 7DII certainly is a great all-around camera, it is much more targeted than the original 7D.

I see the SL2 fitting into a similar niche. Small and light for those who want that, but who want a real viewfinder and want to be able to use their collection of lenses without adapters or compromises.

Sure, I get it.  But that statement above is exactly what the SL1 tried to do.  Are you arguing the SL2 just needs to try harder and get hooked up with the latest tech?

I have zero doubt you want one, and I don't want to marginalize your perspective, but the SL1 failed for a reason, didn't it?  I have a feeling that reason had little to do with whether is had the latest sensor / DPAF / touchscreen etc. or not.  It might have been because the lower end of the APS-C market is saturated with offerings and the ace up SL1's sleeve -- it's size -- wasn't as compelling an option as a more fully featured Rebel, but I certainly could be wrong.

I'm not saying mirrorless is best and efforts to similarly reduce space like the SL1 are futile -- I'm saying that they tried and it wasn't a hit.  I fail to see what would change that this go-round.

- A
24
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS Rebel SL2 Confirmed in 2017 [CR3]
« Last post by slclick on Today at 06:21:37 PM »
This changes things for a few folks waiting or on the fence
25
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS Rebel SL2 Confirmed in 2017 [CR3]
« Last post by ajfotofilmagem on Today at 06:17:05 PM »
Will the 18mp sensor finally be put out to pasture after 8 years?
After 7D, 60D, 60Da, T2i, T3i, T4i, T5i, T5, T6, SL1, M1, M2, M3, M10, is over.

Nitpicking, but the M3 has a 24mpx sensor.
Thanks for the correction.
26
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS Rebel SL2 Confirmed in 2017 [CR3]
« Last post by jolyonralph on Today at 06:11:55 PM »
Will the 18mp sensor finally be put out to pasture after 8 years?
After 7D, 60D, 60Da, T2i, T3i, T4i, T5i, T5, T6, SL1, M1, M2, M3, M10, is over.

Nitpicking, but the M3 has a 24mpx sensor.
27
Must be some paper industry standards thing.

Yep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_size

Blame ANSI C / Ledger!
28
GHPhotography, you're right.  However, there are some features that should be shared that are reserved for the 1 series and it's not just about them being appropriate only for that series.  For example I loved the illuminated focus points in the 1D4 and wanted that in my next camera so .....  Unfortunately there still is a small amount of the Toyota - Lexus analogy in this discussion.

Obviously, one can buy/use multiple cameras but I find for nature shooting and hiking that I'd rather not pack multiple cameras if possible along with multiple lenses.

Jack
29
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon EOS Rebel SL2 Confirmed in 2017 [CR3]
« Last post by unfocused on Today at 06:10:20 PM »
... Why the hell are they making another SL1? ...Surely the tandem of M5/M6 could address the need for folks to keep things small without throwing away functionality...

Because Canon has determined there are sufficient customers out there who are completely uninterested in mirrorless offerings, but who would like small, light DSLR.

I've made the case before and I am making it again. There is a market for this camera.

I believe the difference between the SL1 and SL2 will be similar to the difference between the 7DI and 7DII.

The 7DI was an all-around, general purpose camera for those wanting the best possible APS-C available. The 7DII is a beast that is targeted to a specific niche market -- action photographers who either want APS-C to supplement their full frame, want the extra reach APS-C offers or simply can't justify or afford 1DX price tag. While the 7DII certainly is a great all-around camera, it is much more targeted than the original 7D.

I see the SL2 fitting into a similar niche. Small and light for those who want that, but who want a real viewfinder and want to be able to use their collection of lenses without adapters or compromises.

I would definitely consider an SL2 for hiking when I don't want to take either a 1DX or a 7D. Pair the SL2 with the 18-135 nano USM and you've got a very portable combination that is great for hiking. Without much more weight, you can even throw in the 55-250 STM.

A decent, but modest autofocus is sufficient, since it won't be used for birds in flight with a super-tele. A tilt screen would be okay, but not necessary. What it will need is good connectivity (Wi-Fi, NFC, bluetooth), GPS and touch screen (already on the SL1). A bit of weathersealing would be good, but don't do anything to increase the weight (maybe even cut it slightly, as they did with the 80D vs. 70D).
30
Lenses / Using tilt-shift lenses with focus- and exposure-assist
« Last post by larjon on Today at 06:01:22 PM »
The first time I used a tilt-shift lens I was naive enough to believe that the
auto-exposure would work. I knew I had to focus manually, and then realized I also had
to set the exposure manually. But then came the EOS 5D Mark II with live view, and I was
able to let the camera auto-exposure with the lens shifted.

I have tested my recent 5D Mark IV with both the TS-E 17mm f/4L and the
TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II trying to auto-exposure using the view finder. When the lens shifted
to its maximum to the left or right, the 5D4 over-exposures. When doing the same up or
down, the 5D4 under-exposures heavily.

I have however come up with a method that lets the camera auto-exposure with the lens
shifted when looking thru the viewfinder.
1. Compose the picture looking thru the viewfinder, with the lens shifted as required
2. Keeping the camera steady, press the live view button
3. Press the shutter button to take the picture
4. Press the live view button again to return to viewfinder mode

The only problem is to keep the camera steady while temporary switching to live view,
still "looking" thru the now dark viewfinder, and taking the picture. A tripod would of course help.

I would gladly see a sort of macro option to let the user define a mode which will do
steps 2-4 automatically when pressing the shutter button.

Although the tilt-shift lenses lack autofocus, the camera can still assist you when
focusing. While pressing the shutter button halfway, turn the focus ring until the
camera "beeps" and the red autofocus point(s) lights up, indicating that correct focus
is achieved. Since there is no focus motor in the lens, the photographer have to be
that motor, but the camera can still detect when focused correctly.
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