July 22, 2014, 03:20:35 AM

Recent Posts

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91
Software & Accessories / Re: Tripod legs locking mechanism
« Last post by KeithBreazeal on July 21, 2014, 07:38:46 PM »
Flip is the best for cold or wet conditions.  I have all types and the flip has been my choice.  Quality is a must if you are going to using it all the time and especially with heavier body/lens combos.  Flip is also easier to rough level on rugged terrain.  If you attach a carabiner to the underside of the center support, you can use a backpack to hang for greater steadiness.
92
There's a ton of DIY out there on this...you can make a hot wire cutter for almost nothing with parts from Radio Shack and Home Depot and just do it yourself...enough foam for a dozen inserts and the materials for the cutter for $60 maybe? OThers use electric fillet knives but it's less precise. Check out gun forums, they're all over it.

Lyle
93
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Adopting a MF system.
« Last post by RLPhoto on July 21, 2014, 07:36:29 PM »
I will soon be selling a 5D3 Body, the 24mm F/1.4L II, and the 50mm F/1.2L. I decided to go with Hasselblad because their lens selection is alittle better, True Focus and the Equipment is slightly more affordable. I'll lose out on 1/1600 Syncs but 1/800ths is plenty for the added benefit of True Focus.

Will post again when I've sold this equipment and Ordered the Blad. :)
94
For me (professional photographer, most likely higher file volume than average) I want simplicity, redundancy, reliability and low cost. I found and still use a Lacie thunderbolt 2big drive. It writes in RAID to 2 different drives. As the drives fill up (I buy whatever size is the cheapest per gig at the time), I keep one offsite just in case of some catastrophe like a fire or theft. I've had zero problems, glitches or anything. I guess ideally I'd have cloud storage too but at this point I'm satisfied.

Lyle
95
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« Last post by Lyle Krannichfeld on July 21, 2014, 07:29:31 PM »
My personal setup is an F Stop ICU (a couple sizes depending on the situation) to hold all the camera gear, which goes into a regular backpacking backpack (either a 55L Osprey or 75L Gregory). I attach the camera itself to my shoulder strap with a carabiner if I want easy access. The tripod straps to the outside usually, and I put my Lee filters, remote and an extra battery in the brain of the pack for quick access. I do plan on picking up an F Stop bag that fits the ICU's for a smaller day pack down the road. They seem well built and intelligently designed.
96
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« Last post by RustyTheGeek on July 21, 2014, 06:45:08 PM »
I personally think any camera "backpacking backpack" is a huge waste of money and the people buying them are not really backpackers, they just like to think they are. Weight is a huge burden when backpacking, and all of those camera packs are ridiculously heavy. For example, the 35L Rover Pro is 5 pounds! I think my main pack is 1.5 pounds for comparison...

Just get a pack that fits you well and use the money you save on a good down sleeping bag. If you go this route, get lens cases for each lens and make sure it has a belt loop. When you get to where you are gonna be shooting, put each lens case on the waist belt of the pack and unstrap the tripod from the back.

Works perfectly for me all the time. I had no complaints when I was doing 18 miles and 10k of elevation gain a day through the snow. Plus my pack has loops for ice axes. I could be wrong, but I have not seen that on any camera pack.

Niterider is being brutally honest.  If you want a photography backpack to carry lots of camera gear more comfortably on a day hike, by all means, go for it.  If you plan to do real hiking and live out of your backpack for 2+ days, do yourself a favor and get real hiking gear just like you already do for real photography.  Learn how to camp, hike and carry weight.  Get in shape.  Camp with others that are more experienced and become a knowledgeable outdoor person.  You'll likely spend over $1000 - $1500 before you're done and you'll still lust after some better hiking gear.  And you will likely devise a special unique method and system for your photography so you can enjoy hiking and photography simultaneously.
97
I was happy to see that Pocketwizard has finally released a firmware update (Beta) to make the Pocketwizard MiniTT1 and FlexTT5 for Canon fully compatible with my 1DX (as well as the 6D and 70D). (see www.pocketwizard.com left side of the page).  I'm planning to download the firmware updates and give them a try later this week.

In the meantime, I am wondering if anyone has already downloaded and tested the firmware update with the 1DX?
If so:
1. Do you get full compatibility with the AC3 controller as well?
2. What's the fastest Hypersync shutter speed you have been able to obtain?
3. Any problems identified?

I look forward to hearing from the community and to trying it out myself.
98
EOS Bodies / Re: Patent: 45x Zoom for Waterproof Camera
« Last post by Yankeedog on July 21, 2014, 06:30:11 PM »
Is white balance tricky underwater?  Does it have a WB setting for that?

Briefly, yes.  Light underwater is quite different from on the surface and varies with factors such as depth and water conditions, among other things.

Professional shooters use things like fancy filters to compensate.  The D30 has a generic underwater setting that does pretty well for casual shooting so it's reasonable to assume any new Canon underwater point-and-shoot would also include a setting like this.
99
Software & Accessories / Re: Camera bag for camping
« Last post by Niterider on July 21, 2014, 06:15:10 PM »
I personally think any camera "backpacking backpack" is a huge waste of money and the people buying them are not really backpackers, they just like to think they are. Weight is a huge burden when backpacking, and all of those camera packs are ridiculously heavy. For example, the 35L Rover Pro is 5 pounds! I think my main pack is 1.5 pounds for comparison...

Just get a pack that fits you well and use the money you save on a good down sleeping bag. If you go this route, get lens cases for each lens and make sure it has a belt loop. When you get to where you are gonna be shooting, put each lens case on the waist belt of the pack and unstrap the tripod from the back.

Works perfectly for me all the time. I had no complaints when I was doing 18 miles and 10k of elevation gain a day through the snow. Plus my pack has loops for ice axes. I could be wrong, but I have not seen that on any camera pack.
100
Lenses / Re: Sigma 50mm Art 1.4 Focusing problems
« Last post by thestructured on July 21, 2014, 06:14:15 PM »
I feel so much better to have read this thread. I registered with this forum just to share my experiences. I'm soon to be on my fourth copy of the sigma 50 art. Copy #1 had the issue where center point focusing was fine, however outer points resulted in front focusing, and this was consistent. AFMA can't fix that because it will result in the center cluster (5d3) not working properly. Same issues on my 6d, to a lesser degree. Sigma said they can't fix it until new firmware comes out that addresses this problem. Onto copy #2; my second copy had no problems. It was a beautiful thing, not only because the optics are phenomenal but because it confirmed that I'm not insane and imagining that the first copy had a problem. It was a night and day difference. Then, like an idiot, I returned the second one (the dealer I got it from was selling them at an inflated price) and picked a third one up elsewhere since I found them at their normal price (put $200 back in my pocket). Well, I now regret that because the third one has the same exact outer point issue as copy #1 did. I am going to try for a 4th one, though it's hard to play this game because they are not consistently in stock anywhere.

This problem is very real. If you're lucky enough to get a copy without issues, (and they DO exist), do. not. sell. it.

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