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Author Topic: Panning with 5D3  (Read 2443 times)

te4o

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Panning with 5D3
« on: October 11, 2012, 07:52:33 PM »
I need some advice on panning techniques please:

1. Do I need an image-stabilized lens for panning (I tried panning with the 135/2 with less than desirable success)
2. What would be the appropriate shutter settings compared to the speed of the subject

I used AF servo, Mode 1 and 2 for tangentially moving subjects across the plane, the camera could focus well but I got either motion blur on the subject or not enough blur in the background depending on shutter speed.
Thanks for any help!
5D3 (04/12), Carl Zeiss ZE 21, 35/1.4, 50MP, 100MP
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Panning with 5D3
« on: October 11, 2012, 07:52:33 PM »

Bob Howland

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Re: Panning with 5D3
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2012, 10:09:40 PM »
No, you do not need an image stabilized lens to pan. Subject blur is caused by panning at a different speed ("angular velocity") than your subject was moving when you pressed the shutter. If the background blur for those shots was what you wanted, then my only suggestion is to practice...a lot.

Panning race cars is one of those times when a 6-8 FPS frame rate is useful. It won't make your car any less blurry, but it will allow you to get shots of the car approaching, broadside and moving away, all in the same sequence. I greatly prefer the broadside view. One thing that I have found helpful is to position your body so that you are most comfortable at the end of your shot sequence, then twist your body, with your feet fixed, to where you will begin the sequence. Otherwise, there is a tendency to slow down as you shoot your sequence.

As for shutter speeds, when i try to pan race cars going well over 100 MPH, I use a shutter speed of 1/60 to 1/250 second, with 1/125 being the most common. Even then, only 5-10% of my shots are acceptable.

Hope that helps
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 10:15:47 PM by Bob Howland »

Ryan_W

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Re: Panning with 5D3
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2012, 10:42:45 PM »
I used AF servo, Mode 1 and 2 for tangentially moving subjects across the plane, the camera could focus well but I got either motion blur on the subject or not enough blur in the background depending on shutter speed.


I don't think your AF mode is important, I've achieved pretty great panning shots with and without any kind of fancy AF system. It's more about your timing and how you approach the shot.

I'm a fan of using a longer lens (say 200mm and more) and a monopod or tripod. It can make a big difference and save your arm in practicing panning.

This great photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jimgoldstein/1513211228/#lightbox/ of a Blue Angel jet was taken at an effective telephoto lenght of 380mm and what I love about it is that you still have that hint of motion blur on the aft end of the aircraft. A panned shot razor sharp without any motion blur betrays the end result - to convey speed.

That long length will also provide isolation and compression of the background, making for an overall pretty dynamic shot.

te4o

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Re: Panning with 5D3
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2012, 12:10:09 AM »
Thank you, Bob, good advice on the gym part! I understand that practice is a key to success as usual and I am relieved that you guys don't get every shot straight sharp and good either (I like the plane very much too, Ryan!)
I won't use a monopod initially, though.
So, the most common shutter speed for 100 MPH and around is 1/125. What would your shutter speed be for bikers riding at let's say 40MPH - is this where you use 1/60, Bob? Does your shutter speed depend on the speed of the subject?
5D3 (04/12), Carl Zeiss ZE 21, 35/1.4, 50MP, 100MP
Canon 135/2, Sigma 85/1.4
SONY RX100

paul13walnut5

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Re: Panning with 5D3
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2012, 03:40:02 AM »
Use a monopod for support and smooth panning, manfrotto video monopod is actually perfect. 

Use Ai Servo, select a point that can rest over your subject throughout your pan, tweak ai servo to hold tracking for longer so that foreground interuptions dont distract focus, track subject with half shutter depress ideally for a fee seconds before a burst.

Shutter 1/30th for most background blur, 1/60th for least subject blur without losing effect.

This will give you a smaller aperture which will also help, especially if the subject gets quite close.

Forget IS but use your AF limiter if you have one on lens.

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Menace

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Re: Panning with 5D3
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2012, 07:17:29 AM »
Use a monopod for support and smooth panning, manfrotto video monopod is actually perfect. 

Use Ai Servo, select a point that can rest over your subject throughout your pan, tweak ai servo to hold tracking for longer so that foreground interuptions dont distract focus, track subject with half shutter depress ideally for a fee seconds before a burst.

Shutter 1/30th for most background blur, 1/60th for least subject blur without losing effect.

This will give you a smaller aperture which will also help, especially if the subject gets quite close.

Forget IS but use your AF limiter if you have one on lens.

T R A C K

burstburstburst

T R A C K

burstburstburst

Etc.

Great advice  :)
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Re: Panning with 5D3
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2012, 07:17:29 AM »