November 22, 2017, 12:02:02 PM

Author Topic: Is the first batch of new DSLR bodies usually plagued with defects?  (Read 6301 times)

Frankie T Fotografia

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Is it safe to buy a new DSLR the first day it comes out, or is it likely to have some defects because it's from the first batch? 
5D Mk III, 24 L II,  50 L, 135 L, 180 Macro L, 16-35 f4 IS L, 24-70 f4 IS L, 70-200 f2.8 L IS II, five 600EX-RT, 1.4x Mk III

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leGreve

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I think they take out samples themselves to see how things are.

It might have been so previously, but I can't imagine that companies would allow this sort of "let the consumer find out for us" behavior in future product lines.

Remember they have several cameras behind them, so they know which parts are prone to build errors and what not. And what ever software error there might be, it will be ironed out through firmware upgrades.
If I have the money once the Mk III comes out, I wont hesitate buying it.

I bet they'll go like hot cakes and be in back order in no time...

lee_hom

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I won't worry about that until I see a fixed release date for 5DIII, and the canon warranty should cover any defects.

lol

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I wouldn't worry about it. Hardware problems seem to be very rare. Firmware bugs are not unusual, but updates are easy enough to apply yourself as and when they are released. Waiting after launch is no guarantee either, as some problems can take years to show up like the original 5D mirror issue.
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motorhead

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I tend to take the opposite view. I'd rather wait and let others discover the gremlins, Canon to sort them out and then I buy.

Here I'm particularly thinking of the 1Ds fiasco a few years back. Some cameras seemed to spend more of their early years back with Canon being worked on than they did with the owner. It also tends to be true that being an "early adopter" is spending more money, wait until the large discount houses get the cameras and the "normal" price will drop everywhere. 

Flake

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I remember the 'black dot' issue reported on early 5D MkIIs which was quickly addressed with a firmware update.

More of a problem for me is the fact that adobe ACR seems to take such a damn long time to update to new models, so if you do buy a new release camera it's a catch up game waiting for the software to be fully compatable.  Then there's the issue with older copies of software which won't upgrade to the latest ACR releases meaning you buy a new camera & then you need a complete new software suite too!

prestonpalmer

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Is it safe to buy a new DSLR the first day it comes out, or is it likely to have some defects because it's from the first batch?

Frankie,

Actually quite the opposite is true.  When a new product (camera) is produced on the production line, the first batches are some of the best.  When they start the assembly line for the new camera, every part of the production equipment is freshly calibrated. Every production tolerance on every machine is perfectly calibrated and exactly within specifications which means that the cameras are assembled with tolerances to much greater accuracy that those that come later between production tolerance calibrations.  There is no advantage to waiting.  They will find improvements in the firmware over time, and that does not have anything to do with how the camera was assembled.  Every time Canon produces a new camera, I have one of the first.  Generally off the first US bound ship. I have NEVER had a design flaw in any camera I have purchased. The reliability of these bodies is unbeatable. Letting them work out the "buggs" is a fallacy that many people have bought into.

~Preston

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CR Backup Admin

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Is it safe to buy a new DSLR the first day it comes out, or is it likely to have some defects because it's from the first batch?

I had a early 300D, 40D, 5D MK II, 7D, and a early 1D MK III with no issues.  Sure, there were minor updates to fix obscure issues, but none of them impacted me, and none of the cameras ever failed in service.

Frankie T Fotografia

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Thank you for addressing my question. That worry is now gone. Let's just hope Canon can live up to the expectations with the 5D Mark III
5D Mk III, 24 L II,  50 L, 135 L, 180 Macro L, 16-35 f4 IS L, 24-70 f4 IS L, 70-200 f2.8 L IS II, five 600EX-RT, 1.4x Mk III

RyanCrierie

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Actually quite the opposite is true.  When a new product (camera) is produced on the production line, the first batches are some of the best. When they start the assembly line for the new camera, every part of the production equipment is freshly calibrated.

So? Any mass production line has regular calibration checks on the equipment, especially with something as precision as a modern digital SLR camera to ensure that all parts are manufactured to the same tolerances. This is especially important with Just In Time Production where you can't have any part rejections that bring the production line to a halt until you get a new part shipped to you.

Wait a few weeks I would say; to let any non-obvious things work themselves out through firmware updates and to let the assembly workers get experience.

prestonpalmer

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Re: Is the first batch of new DSLR bodies usually plagued with defects?
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2011, 10:37:11 AM »

So? Any mass production line has regular calibration checks on the equipment, especially with something as precision as a modern digital SLR camera to ensure that all parts are manufactured to the same tolerances. This is especially important with Just In Time Production where you can't have any part rejections that bring the production line to a halt until you get a new part shipped to you.

Yes, the production equipment undergoes re-calibration regularly.  Remember, even with something as precise as a camera, there is still a RANGE OF ACCEPTABLE ERROR during production and assembly.  So long as the error is not greater than tolerance, the camera's are out the door and in your hands.  The most accurately assembled cameras are produced immediately after one of these calibrations where error tolerance is at a minimum.

~Preston

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Re: Is the first batch of new DSLR bodies usually plagued with defects?
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2011, 10:37:11 AM »