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Bokeh Quality from Different Fullframes vs APS-C´s DLSRs?

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ZoeEnPhos:
Dear Forum Readers/Writers!

Maybe my question is not interesting or not relevant to be answered?

I searched the forum for the quality of the bokeh, and find a tread about bokeh from different fast Canon lenses.
However - my question is - could different sizes of the sensor affect the end result how the quality of the bokeh will appear in the photo? The quality of bokeh in for example flower-images has made me interested and open my eyes for the right use of bokeh in order to create a photo that will be a complete in relation between sharpness and bokeh. Maybe here is others who has already dug into this subject much more profoundly and solidly?

For example can 5DMKII vs 5DMKIII vs 1DX produce slightly different character of how the bokeh will be formed in the photo when comparing the three full-format-sensors - due to the different mega-pixel-numbers?

Is the bokeh from an APS-C DSLR different in quality from the look from a full-frame DSLR´s?

Is the bokeh produced by the super-tele-lenses the most soft-edged, even with the quite "poor" MFD ((Minimum Focus Distance)?

(How about using many Extension Tubes, how many have you tested to stack when using for example the EF300/500/600mm, in order to not get vignetting?
And last q - will the use of an additional and different Extender affect the bokeh in some way by prolonging the focal-lenght- when using either the APS-C vs full-frame sensor DSLR?

I would appreciate if someone maybe happens to have some experience of the bokeh result that you value and are satisfied with! 8)

Wishing you all happy shootings!

//C

PS. The photo is with full-frame 5DMKII with EF100mm f/2.8L IS USM @ f/2.8 and the yellowish flowers are Rudbeckia which is an ancient flower named after Carl von Linné professor Olof Rudbeck Jr in Uppsala Sweden and the blue is a field of Cornflower, Bachelors button, Bluebottle, Boutonniere flower, Hurtsickle, or Cyani flower.

neuroanatomist:

--- Quote from: ZoeEnPhos on November 06, 2012, 09:34:11 AM ---For example can 5DMKII vs 5DMKIII vs 1DX produce slightly different character of how the bokeh will be formed in the photo when comparing the three full-format-sensors - due to the different mega-pixel-numbers?

--- End quote ---

Possibly, but if so, it would be a very subtle difference, and likely only evident in some shots.


--- Quote from: ZoeEnPhos on November 06, 2012, 09:34:11 AM ---Is the bokeh from an APS-C DSLR different in quality from the look from a full-frame DSLR´s?

--- End quote ---

It can be.  In some cases, the bokeh is better with an APS-C sensor, assuming you're using an EF (not EF-S) lens.  Lens vignetting results in the bokeh of highlights at the edges of the frame having a 'cat's-eye' appearance instead of the more desirable round appearance, and since an APS-C sensor crops away the edges, the vignetting is less and the bokeh at the frame edges is better.


--- Quote from: ZoeEnPhos on November 06, 2012, 09:34:11 AM ---Is the bokeh produced by the super-tele-lenses the most soft-edged, even with the quite "poor" MFD ((Minimum Focus Distance)?

--- End quote ---

Not really.  The supertele lenses are really optimized for sharpness.  Lens design is all about tradeoffs.  One lens known for particularly good bokeh (often described as 'creamy') is the 50mm f/1.2L.  That lens is optimized for bokeh, and the way that's done is to undercorrect for speherical aberration in the lens design.  When you do that, you get better bokeh, at the cost of a loss of some sharpness (and some focus shift, too).

nightbreath:
In my opinion bokeh is produced by exposure (light waves under specific angles) and lens design (set of lens elements that pass through the light). Sensor is responsible for capturing the light and that's all.

Fotofanten:

--- Quote from: DB on November 06, 2012, 10:21:28 AM ---
--- Quote from: nightbreath on November 06, 2012, 10:08:28 AM ---In my opinion bokeh is produced by exposure (light waves under specific angles) and lens design (set of lens elements that pass through the light). Sensor is responsible for capturing the light and that's all.

--- End quote ---

But what about the different sensor size + distance from the lens, as I understand it the f-stop comparison needs to be adjusted from APS-C to FF, so perhaps this explains why the Bokeh on a crop may appear better at say f2.8, but using the same lens on a FF a direct like-for-like comparison would require a smaller aperture to get the same field of view...so really need to compare bokeh by adjusting aperture first??

--- End quote ---

When you say field of view I think of the width of the angle. I would rather say that a like-for-like comparison would require a smaller aperture to get the same depth of field...

As for the relationship between bokeh and sensor size, they key point must be that with a larger sensor you get more space for bokeh in your picture. True, at the edges on FF bokeh could be considered to degrade somewhat, compared to an EF lens on a crop body (since the not-perfectly-circular bokeh will be cropped out), but still, I would argue that the quality of the bokeh benefits from a larger sensor. Why? Because the larger the sensor, the longer the focal length you employ  for any certain field of view. Case in point: It should be easier to design a 35mm lens for full frame than a 17,5mm lens for micro four thirds that enables pleasant bokeh, since the latter lens will be more of a wide angle design. Am I wrong?

RLPhoto:
I prefer FF.

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