April 19, 2014, 06:49:22 PM

Author Topic: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand  (Read 2375 times)

bschaefer

  • Guest
DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« on: September 25, 2012, 07:04:05 PM »
Hey guys,

I am relatively new to DSLR photography, but have fallen in love with it. I currently have a 60d with a 17-55 lens. I am leaving in December to go to Thailand for one full month and am trying to find the best possible back pack for all of my gear plus a little bit of stuff as I would want to use it as a day pack as well.

Before I leave I will be purchasing a hood, UV filter, extra battery(s), small tripod (I've been using a friend's and it is a monster of a tripod), and one more lens (undecided and open to suggestions).

So my needs/desires will be as follows:

1. Fit all gear mentioned above.

2. Ideally make a full left or right portion of backpack a spot for the tripod. I will be buying a small tripod that will be able to fit inside the pack

3. Be comfortable enough to carry literally every where in thailand in addition to my relatively small travel backpack. (the travel backpack will stay in hostels and go at the bottom of buses, etc.. but the dslr bag will ALWAYS be with me)

4. Have just enough space for a water bottle and change of clothes

5. Under $150

Any and all advice will be appreciated.

THANKS!

canon rumors FORUM

DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« on: September 25, 2012, 07:04:05 PM »

FaiWaaep

  • PowerShot G16
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2012, 09:54:51 PM »
Last year I was in Thailand at December and January. I had my 7D with ef 70-200 f/4 L IS, EF 100 f/2 L IS Macro, 24-105 f/4 L IS, EF 50 f/1.8 II and Speedlite 270EX.
I carry them in my Tamrac’s Rally 5 including my 10.1 " netbook. Netbook I leave in my room when I go out. I carry that bag at flights too and keep it under my seet.
Water bottle you can carry in Tamrac's side "net pocket". And I like it because it don't wet my back when carry it around all day.
But like you wrote, you like to have some clothes with you in your daytrips then this bag is not for you. Full already...

I have backpack too for my camera gear but I choose to leave it my home because I like more shoulderbag and I use that backpack only if I need to take all my gear with me.
And in Thailand the gear I need was only those which I listed above. For tripod I use my Gorillapod and that was enough tripod for me.

Before my trip I tested quite many bags in local camera shops with my gear that I had planned to take to Thailand. And that's how I found right bag for my use.
LowePro (Photo Sport Sling 100/200 AW) and other vendors have many "Sling Bags", maybe they are more suitable for your use. 
Hope this give's you some help/ideas....
« Last Edit: September 26, 2012, 10:54:21 PM by FaiWaaep »

And-Rew

  • Guest
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2012, 03:19:24 PM »
I think you're looking at this from the wrong perspective.

I bought a Manfrotto Compact Photo Tripod MKC3-PF - White for £50 and also its dedicated Manfrotto case. Upshot is i have a tripod in a case that is no bigger than my wife's fore arm, and she is only 5ft 3".
I also purchased a Manfrotto Stile Bella IV Shoulder Bag Cord, which adequately holds all you are asking of it, with room for mobile phone and wallet.

I can assure you, neither bag/ case is large to carry, or heavy. And with it being in 2 parts, i'm not afraid to leave the tripod section in the hotel room. So small is it, that it will fit in the suitcase whilst you are out exploring.

All 3 items came to no more than £100 (tripod, case & camera bag) and are all of great quality whilst being light. Much better than lugging every thing else around.

It really doesn't get any smaller or lighter than that, and much more conspicuous than a medium to large Lowepro bag or similar.

bschaefer

  • Guest
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2012, 10:34:25 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions all. I decided to get the Lowepro Sport 200 AW. It seems like it will fit all my needs. Thanks for the help. Now on to my next hunt.... a compact tripod that can do both video and photos.  ;D


ebroesicke

  • Guest
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2012, 08:39:32 PM »
Not to muddy the waters, but I checked out the pack you mention and settled on the lowepro versapack for all of the reasons you mentioned.  Used it in costa rica this year.  Canon 7d, 17-50 tamron and 70-200 f/4.  also hoods, batteries filters etc.  worked really well.  just a thought, enjoy your trip.

FaiWaaep

  • PowerShot G16
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2012, 12:12:45 PM »
And do not forget to take a ND / CPL filter/ters with you.
Wish you a pleasant journey.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2012, 12:12:45 PM »

bschaefer

  • Guest
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2012, 01:42:11 AM »
You guys mentioned filters. Which filters are worth buying and why? In what situations would I need a specific one? And I also don't fully know what a lens hood is for. Totally ignorant when it comes to this stuff.

FaiWaaep

  • PowerShot G16
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2012, 01:07:00 PM »
Basically,

CPL (Circular Polarizing) you can get deep blue skies, get better picture through glass and makes easier to you to see into the water (fishes). Handy here in Thailand because many temples have the Buddhas etc. in a class frame and zoo's have the snakes and the other reptiles in a class terrario.

ND (Neutral Density) allows you to use longer exposure time to blur water, clouds and all the other moving things during the daytime without overexposing the frame.

GND (Graduated Neutral Density) let you selectively darken the top, bottom or any half/part of the frame. Usually used to prevent the sky from overexposing in a landscape. The sun can be very bright in Thailand, even on a rainy day...

I'm using Cokin Filter systems because then I need only one CPL, ND and GND filter. I just need the right adapter ring to every lens I want to use them. Only downside is that they cost more than those "screw on" filters.

More about filters
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-lens-filters.htm

A for your question about lens hood.
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Canon-Lenses/Lens-Hoods.aspx

And above in the filter link is more information about purpose of the lens hood, just search.


Don Haines

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 2433
  • Posting cat pictures on the internet since 1986
    • View Profile
Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2012, 06:16:07 AM »
I went a different route and got a small hiking backpack with good side access. I am a bit on the tall side and found that none of the photography backpacks could be adjusted properly for a good fit..... but then again, I tend to do week long backpacking trips and have a high standard as to how a pack should feel...

I use a DSLR bag to protect the camera, one of the ones that just barely fits the camera and lens, and carry extra lenses inside the backpack in individual cases sized for the lens.. Carbon fibre is the way to go for tripods, they are more rigid than any of the lightweight tripods. When taking pictures, the carbon fibre tripod may not have the weight to be stable when the wind is blowing.... take a small piece of rope, put the pack under the tripod, and use the rope to put some loading on the tripod. This has the added advantage of nobody can run off with your pack while you are distracted taking pictures.

Also, on the security side, a dedicated camera backpack indicates that there is almost certainly a good camera inside it... be careful if you go that route...
The best camera is the one in your hands

canon rumors FORUM

Re: DSLR Backpack for a trip to Thailand
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2012, 06:16:07 AM »