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Food pics - help required

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scotty512:
Hi All

help required, a friend is opening a restuarant soon and has asked me to take some shots not only of the place and the staff but also of the dishes.

now never having taken foodstuff pictures (other than on my iphone went out eating) I havent a clue what would be the best equipment to use, i currently own

5D Mk3
24-105 f4 lens
430 II flash

50mm F1.4
70-200mm f2.8 II
100mm macro L f2.8
manfotto tripod

what would you recommend from a equipment perspective and any assistance with techniques would be great..

time to go home make lasagne and practice I think !

Cheers
scott

RLPhoto:
It depends on the food. I done a lot of food before and I always use novatron strobes for the power output they have. If you cannot acquire some strobes, you can make due with your 430EX with some creative use of reflectors and bounce cards. The only issue is you will have to keep your Aperture Small and shutter-speed high to get lots of DOF and to prevent ambient adding color casts. This means with a tiny 430EX, you will have to raise your ISOs.

Your question is too broad, we really need to know the genre of food you will be doing.

TrumpetPower!:
Food photography is a specialized art form, and it's as much sculpture as it is photography. Lots of things that taste great on food just don't look at all right on camera -- and that's before you get into things that melt, wilt, or discolor after just a minute or so.

I think the best advice I could offer to you would be to do a lot of experimentation to get the shot staged just the way you want it, then throw away that dish (or hand it to your starving assistant to more properly dispose of) and have the chef plop down a freshly-prepared replacement and immediately press the shutter.

Aside from that, all the usual photographic stuff applies.

As always, it's all about the light, and you're likely going to want something big and directional, like a softbox or a parabolic umbrella, and probably something smaller (bare reflector or reflector with honeycomb grid or snoot or barn doors) for some specular interest. Maybe some rim lighting, too. You can fake a lot with an off-camera hotshoe flash and a reflector if you have to and you're patient and you can tolerate higher ISO settings.

And, of course, pay attention to perspective and depth of field and what's in your background and all the rest. Ideal would be either the 45 or 90 TS-E, but you should be good with what you've got. Reach first for the macro and only go to the others if it doesn't cut the mustard.

Good luck!

Cheers,

b&

scotty512:
Hi RL

at the moment I dont know the exact menu, I have asked the chef for a dining menu and I will gauge from that the types of dishes he will be producing...he has offered to pay for me to do them however i would rather use the cash to acquire the equipment required such as reflector, cards etc

i imagine the food will the typical french cuisine as he trained at the savoy,  I will post menu when I have it

scotty512:

--- Quote from: TrumpetPower! on December 14, 2012, 10:47:37 AM ---Food photography is a specialized art form, and it's as much sculpture as it is photography. Lots of things that taste great on food just don't look at all right on camera -- and that's before you get into things that melt, wilt, or discolor after just a minute or so.

I think the best advice I could offer to you would be to do a lot of experimentation to get the shot staged just the way you want it, then throw away that dish (or hand it to your starving assistant to more properly dispose of) and have the chef plop down a freshly-prepared replacement and immediately press the shutter.

Aside from that, all the usual photographic stuff applies.

As always, it's all about the light, and you're likely going to want something big and directional, like a softbox or a parabolic umbrella, and probably something smaller (bare reflector or reflector with honeycomb grid or snoot or barn doors) for some specular interest. Maybe some rim lighting, too. You can fake a lot with an off-camera hotshoe flash and a reflector if you have to and you're patient and you can tolerate higher ISO settings.

And, of course, pay attention to perspective and depth of field and what's in your background and all the rest. Ideal would be either the 45 or 90 TS-E, but you should be good with what you've got. Reach first for the macro and only go to the others if it doesn't cut the mustard.

Good luck!

Cheers,

b&

--- End quote ---

thanks

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