October 02, 2014, 08:46:20 AM

Author Topic: How well suited is the Rokinon (cine) 35mm for stills? (Disguised lens advice)  (Read 1816 times)

Kream

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Hello everyone,

First post here, even though I visit the the site and forum daily. But there comes a time where one just need some specific advice, as I haven't found an answer to my questions.
My parents gave me a canon 6d for my masters graduation (I'm still humbled by there generosity!), which was a big step up from my 400d. Full frame, I love it :). Besides that I own a 50mm 1.8 and a Tamron 28-75 2.8.
The work I have planned for my set is the basis of my unanswered inquiry. For I plan to use both still and video mode at the same level.
Together with 2 friends I own an online webshop for premium menswear (www.huntingensemble.com). All productshots shall come from my 6d. But we'll also use it to make our own video's; short but highly edited clips that represent the coming collection.  Beside our webshop I’ll be trying to make video’s in any shape of form (musicvideo, company video’s, etc.) and want to delve deeper in portrait photography.

Long story, but here's my crux. I sort of fell I love with the images of the Rokinon 35mm. Tack sharp with, for me, great color and contrast. And, most importantly, at my max price rang. 600 euro's for me is the ultra maximum.
However, it lacks AF. And I just don't know how that'll affect our productshoots. I just don't have enough experience with studioshoots and even less with MF only lenses. From my own rationality I deducted that lack of AF in our current studio setting may not be so big a disaster as I first thought. Though time is of the essence, because we have tons of items to shoot, I will only be standing from two designated distances from the model (one for upperbody shots and for full body shots). My question is, with an aperture of around f6 is it possible to just keep two focuspoints in check when I and the model keep the exact same distance (marked by tape on the ground)?
My second question: how does the declicked aperture ring affect still shooting? It has obvious advantages for video work, but does it influence still shooting in a negative way? Because if it does not, I would tend to favor the cine version.
My third question: does anyone perhaps have an other solution for my situation? The reason why I like the Rokinon is because it’s a perfect video lens. Smooth and large focusring with enough room to focus. I find that my Tamron and especially my Canon 50mm are just not smooth enough to work with. The new Sigma 35mm also looks great but is too expensive. The 50mm 1.4 isn’t strong enough when shooting video. I don’t want to work with a zoom as I already have the Tamron, I just really like the optics of a prime.
Well, my apologies  for the not so brief post , but any advice is appreciated ;)!

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paul13walnut5

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If you do video you won't need AF.

Obviously you may prefer it for stills, perhaps fit a split prism focus screen to assist MF in stills mode?

Declicked aperture or electronic dial? 

If video is going to form a big part of your work then a manual iris is great, and declicked even better.  For video you get a live view of how things will look, you'll need to switch off exp comp in live view to get a true view for stills.

Obviously as you stop down the viewfinder / image darkens, you may prefer to compose and focus wide open and stop down before shooting - easy for video, pain in the a for stills, a bit 1960's.

But these are the compromises for a well sorted bright inexpensive prime.

Only bother with the cine version if you are absolutely going to use follow focus gearing and a rig.  The photo version is cheaper and easier to live with for mixed use.  And you can get a declicked non-cine version.


Drizzt321

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If you do video you won't need AF.

Obviously you may prefer it for stills, perhaps fit a split prism focus screen to assist MF in stills mode?

Declicked aperture or electronic dial? 

If video is going to form a big part of your work then a manual iris is great, and declicked even better.  For video you get a live view of how things will look, you'll need to switch off exp comp in live view to get a true view for stills.

Obviously as you stop down the viewfinder / image darkens, you may prefer to compose and focus wide open and stop down before shooting - easy for video, pain in the a for stills, a bit 1960's.

But these are the compromises for a well sorted bright inexpensive prime.

Only bother with the cine version if you are absolutely going to use follow focus gearing and a rig.  The photo version is cheaper and easier to live with for mixed use.  And you can get a declicked non-cine version.

++ for this

Really the biggest advantages of the cine version is a declicked aperture control (which means you can change the aperture while filming with it being less noticeable), and I believe a much longer throw on the focusing ring, which is better for video, especially with a follow focus setup.

For stills, I'm assuming you are using some kind of strobe/speedlite lighting, right? So you're probably stopping down to f/8 or so anyway, so you can probably get away with your current focusing screen, but I believe the 6D has an officially user replaceable focus screen which means you can get a higher precision screen to more easily get the focus using a manual focus lens.
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